• The Yankees Are Just A .500 Team After Their First 42 Games Of 2012

    Posted by on May 21st, 2012 · Comments (17)

    Here’s what their record was after their first 42 games in the twenty five years prior to this season:

    Rk Tm Year 6 W L   W-L%
    2 NYY 2011 23 19 Ind. Games .548
    3 NYY 2010 26 16 Ind. Games .619
    4 NYY 2009 24 18 Ind. Games .571
    5 NYY 2008 20 22 Ind. Games .476
    6 NYY 2007 19 23 Ind. Games .452
    7 NYY 2006 24 18 Ind. Games .571
    8 NYY 2005 22 20 Ind. Games .524
    9 NYY 2004 24 18 Ind. Games .571
    10 NYY 2003 27 15 Ind. Games .643
    11 NYY 2002 27 15 Ind. Games .643
    12 NYY 2001 23 19 Ind. Games .548
    13 NYY 2000 25 17 Ind. Games .595
    14 NYY 1999 24 18 Ind. Games .571
    15 NYY 1998 32 10 Ind. Games .762
    16 NYY 1997 25 17 Ind. Games .595
    17 NYY 1996 25 17 Ind. Games .595
    18 NYY 1995 17 25 Ind. Games .405
    19 NYY 1994 29 13 Ind. Games .690
    20 NYY 1993 24 18 Ind. Games .571
    21 NYY 1992 23 19 Ind. Games .548
    22 NYY 1991 18 24 Ind. Games .429
    23 NYY 1990 17 25 Ind. Games .405
    24 NYY 1989 20 22 Ind. Games .476
    25 NYY 1988 28 14 Ind. Games .667
    26 NYY 1987 27 15 Ind. Games .643
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 5/21/2012.

    .
    There’s a good chance that the Yankees will win less than 90 games this season…if you go by the feel of their season so far.  Just like they did in 2008.

    Comments on The Yankees Are Just A .500 Team After Their First 42 Games Of 2012

    1. ken
      May 21st, 2012 | 10:42 pm

      Ok. I’ll say it: the Girardi watch begins now.

      Maybe what this team really needs is The Boss. What would he be doing now?

    2. May 22nd, 2012 | 6:57 am

      ken wrote:

      Maybe what this team really needs is The Boss. What would he be doing now?

      Yup. There is no accountability in Yankeeland any more. Granted, the Boss was a knee jerk reaction guy, and that was not always good for the team. But, clearly, he was felt and applied some heat. That doesn’t exist in Yankeeland anymore. Today, it’s “the numbers will be there at the end of the year, yadda, yadda….”

      If Big Stein were around and sound today, Tex, A-Rod, Girardi, Long and a few others would be in the crosshairs right now.

    3. Raf
      May 22nd, 2012 | 7:38 am

      ken wrote:

      Maybe what this team really needs is The Boss. What would he be doing now?

      Scratching away at the inside of his coffin?

    4. Raf
      May 22nd, 2012 | 7:40 am

      Steve L. wrote:

      Granted, the Boss was a knee jerk reaction guy, and that was not always good for the team.

      It hurt more than it helped. The Yankees win a lot more in the 80′s and don’t collapse towards the end of the 80′s had Steinbrenner listened to his baseball people and just stuck to building ships or the Yankee empire.

    5. MJ Recanati
      May 22nd, 2012 | 9:06 am

      ken wrote:

      Maybe what this team really needs is The Boss.

      Because The Boss did the Yankees so much good with his absurd, illogical behavior over the years.

      Steve L. wrote:

      If Big Stein were around and sound today, Tex, A-Rod, Girardi, Long and a few others would be in the crosshairs right now.

      To what end? Simply trashing a guy in the papers achieves nothing. Accountability isn’t just telling a group of reporters how much someone sucks.

    6. May 22nd, 2012 | 10:21 am

      My fav, Thurman Munson, once said: “Don’t measure me by my methods. Measure me by my results.”

      And, when he had his marbles, from 1973 to 2003, Steinbrenner’s Yankees won the WS in 1977, 1978, 1996, 1998, 1999 and 2000. And, they made the WS in 1976, 1981, 2001 and 2003. When you look at the results, Big Stein has the pelts on his belt.

      You cannot say that about the post-2003 Yankees. They have one pelt.

    7. Corey Italiano
      May 22nd, 2012 | 12:26 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      My fav, Thurman Munson, once said: “Don’t measure me by my methods. Measure me by my results.”
      And, when he had his marbles, from 1973 to 2003, Steinbrenner’s Yankees won the WS in 1977, 1978, 1996, 1998, 1999 and 2000. And, they made the WS in 1976, 1981, 2001 and 2003. When you look at the results, Big Stein has the pelts on his belt.
      You cannot say that about the post-2003 Yankees. They have one pelt.

      1973-2003 = 6/31 = 17.6%
      2003-2011 = 1/9 = 11.1%

      Not that different after all.

    8. Corey Italiano
      May 22nd, 2012 | 12:29 pm

      Corey Italiano wrote:

      1973-2003 = 6/31 = 17.6%
      2003-2011 = 1/9 = 11.1%
      Not that different after all.

      Especially when you consider how many more rounds of playoffs there are now vs. the pre-95 era.

    9. May 22nd, 2012 | 12:42 pm

      @ Corey Italiano:
      Use pennants instead of rings and then what are the %?

    10. Corey Italiano
      May 22nd, 2012 | 12:45 pm

      @ Steve L.:
      In previous debates we’ve used championships as the metric to judge Cashmans performance.

      Since there are far more rounds in the playoffs today than in the pre-95 era, it’s an impossible comparison.

      Would you prefer % of playoff berths? :P

    11. MJ Recanati
      May 22nd, 2012 | 1:01 pm

      Corey Italiano wrote:

      1973-2003 = 6/31 = 17.6%
      2003-2011 = 1/9 = 11.1%
      Not that different after all.Especially when you consider how many more rounds of playoffs there are now vs. the pre-95 era.

      Exactly right.

    12. MJ Recanati
      May 22nd, 2012 | 1:03 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      And, when he had his marbles, from 1973 to 2003, Steinbrenner’s Yankees won the WS in 1977, 1978, 1996, 1998, 1999 and 2000. And, they made the WS in 1976, 1981, 2001 and 2003. When you look at the results, Big Stein has the pelts on his belt. You cannot say that about the post-2003 Yankees. They have one pelt.

      So Steinbrenner’s money doesn’t factor in here. It was merely his passion and desire to win and his willingness to behave like an absolute insane degenerate prick that helped the team gain all those “pelts”?

      I’ll remember that the next time you talk about the Steinbrenner checkbook.

    13. May 22nd, 2012 | 1:06 pm

      How many times, when Stein was in charge, did his team have the same gap in payroll between them and the 2nd highest team as they do now?

      In fact, there were some years where the Yankees won and they did not lead the league in payroll, IIRC.

      The gap between the Yankees now, and everyone else, is obscene.

      It’s apples and oranges – then and now

    14. MJ Recanati
      May 22nd, 2012 | 1:23 pm

      @ Steve L.:
      You can tell us it’s apples and oranges but that doesn’t change the fact that it wasn’t Steinbrenner’s behavior disorder that caused the team to spring for Goose Gossage, Catfish Hunter, Reggie Jackson, Ed Whitson, Dave Winfield, David Wells, Roger Clemens, David Cone, etc. It was his money.

      There is absolutely no evidence — not a shred — to suggest that Steinbrenner’s temper tantrums positively contributed to the New York Yankees from 1973-2003. After all, that was what your comment at 6:57 am this morning suggested. That this team lacks an owner with the requisite anger management issues to shake them into a winning streak. As if.

    15. Corey Italiano
      May 22nd, 2012 | 1:44 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      The gap between the Yankees now, and everyone else, is obscene.

      It’s really not as bad as you would think, % wise. in the mid aughts it was insane. The league is catching up, however.

    16. Raf
      May 22nd, 2012 | 6:06 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      How many times, when Stein was in charge, did his team have the same gap in payroll between them and the 2nd highest team as they do now?

      What was the salary structure then and now?

    17. Raf
      May 22nd, 2012 | 6:09 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      The gap between the Yankees now, and everyone else, is obscene.

      If it means having Jeter, Posada, Mo, & Bernie lasting their entire career with the Yankees, so be it. You could’ve added Pettitte to that list too, had there not been so much concern over his elbow.

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.