• How A-Rod Can Become A Baseball God (For Only $114 Million)

    Posted by on May 22nd, 2012 · Comments (33)

    Alex Rodriguez is off to a rough start this season. He appears to be a shell of what he once was – in terms of his offensive production. And, this downturn has been a trend for him over the last five years or so.

    At this point, assuming that his days as a star player are indeed over, A-Rod could create a new and special legacy for himself (in the history of the game) if he would just pull a “Gil Meche” and say “You know, I’ve made over a quarter-billion dollars in my baseball career, to date. Money is not an issue for me. Rather than perform at a level below my expectations, I am going to retire from the game now and give up the last five years of my contract with the Yankees.”

    If Alex Rodriguez made a move like this, then people would forget all the stupid stuff that’s he done and said in the past. He would not be remembered for being a self-absorbed prima donna. Even his PED history would take back seat to this news. A-Rod would be known as “The Guy Who Walked Away From $114 Million Rather Than Milk The Yankees.”

    I know, I know…”Walk away from $114 million?” Yes, it seems insane. But, what could that money possible buy you, in your lifetime, that you could not already buy with the quarter-billion dollars that you already made? Seriously, a quarter-billion. I mean, come on…

    But, you know this will never happen. And, it’s too bad. It could be the best $114 million that A-Rod ever spent….if he cares about his place in baseball history.

    Comments on How A-Rod Can Become A Baseball God (For Only $114 Million)

    1. Corey Italiano
      May 22nd, 2012 | 12:43 pm

      At this point, assuming that his days as a star player are indeed over, A-Rod could create a new and special legacy for himself (in the history of the game) if he would just pull a “Gil Meche” and say “You know, I’ve made over a quarter-billion dollars in my baseball career, to date. Money is not an issue for me. Rather than perform at a level below my expectations, I am going to retire from the game now and give up the last five years of my contract with the Yankees.”
      ——————-
      haha come on man.

    2. MJ Recanati
      May 22nd, 2012 | 12:59 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      A-Rod could create a new and special legacy for himself (in the history of the game) if he would just pull a “Gil Meche”

      Gil Meche retired with one year left on his contract. Not quite a parallel example.

      Steve L. wrote:

      I know, I know…”Walk away from $114 million?” Yes, it seems insane. But, what could that money possible buy you, in your lifetime, that you could not already buy with the quarter-billion dollars that you already made? Seriously, a quarter-billion. I mean, come on…

      To us, that’s a lot of money. To the uber-wealthy, there’s no reason to leave money on the table. None of us would ever leave money on the table so there’s no reason to ask Rodriguez to do the same.

      Steve L. wrote:

      And, it’s too bad. It could be the best $114 million that A-Rod ever spent….if he cares about his place in baseball history.

      His place in baseball history is already secure. Leaving $114M on the table wouldn’t change anything. A three-time MVP, a member of the 600-HR club, etc. You’re dreaming if you think Rodriguez’s place in baseball is tenuous in any way or that the narrative would change by retiring before the end of his contract.

    3. May 22nd, 2012 | 1:07 pm

      @ MJ Recanati: You don’t think, if A-Rod collects $114 million over the next 5 years and has a SLG% of .400 over that time, that it won’t impact his baseball legacy?

    4. MJ Recanati
      May 22nd, 2012 | 1:19 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      You don’t think, if A-Rod collects $114 million over the next 5 years and has a SLG% of .400 over that time, that it won’t impact his baseball legacy?

      Nope. With the obvious exception that BBWAA voters penalize PED users when it comes to the HOF, A-Rod is still a first-ballot HOF’er based on credentials.

    5. May 22nd, 2012 | 1:32 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      With the obvious exception that BBWAA voters penalize PED users when it comes to the HOF, A-Rod is still a first-ballot HOF’er based on credentials.

      Ty Cobb is in the HOF. So is Tony Gwynn. Yet, what the baseball public thinks of them, legacy-wise, in terms of their personality, is night and day. Being in the Hall of Fame is one thing. Your legacy among fans of the game is another.

    6. MJ Recanati
      May 22nd, 2012 | 1:33 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      You don’t think, if A-Rod collects $114 million over the next 5 years and has a SLG% of .400 over that time, that it won’t impact his baseball legacy?

      You’re conflating the money still outstanding on his contract and his declining performance into the question of legacy.

      His legacy is secure, irrespective of his declining performance. Every player declines, after all. We choose to remember players however we wish. Some people focus on the image of Willie Mays stumbling on the basepaths in a Mets uniform in the early 70′s. Most focus on his amazing feats of baseball brilliance in the 50′s and 60′s in Manhattan and San Francisco. Similarly, some will remember A-Rod as the player they hated with a passion and others will remember him as a fantastic ballplayer.

      What you’re reacting to is the fact that the Yankees owe him so much money. The money has nothing to do with his baseball legacy, except as the answer to the trivia question “who is the only player in baseball history to sign two 10-year contracts?”

      Of course, legacy can be partly subjective. That you will remember him the way you wish to remember him doesn’t change the fact that the baseball aspect of his legacy is completely separate from your own personal feelings towards the man.

    7. May 22nd, 2012 | 1:45 pm

      Well, if the money paid didn’t matter, then I guess, to you, it didn’t matter that Carl Pavano sucked with the Yankees?

    8. Corey Italiano
      May 22nd, 2012 | 1:48 pm

      @ Steve L.:
      If Derek Jeter can turn around his age 36-37 season, I think A-Rod can too.

      Why not?

    9. MJ Recanati
      May 22nd, 2012 | 1:56 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      Ty Cobb is in the HOF. So is Tony Gwynn. Yet, what the baseball public thinks of them, legacy-wise, in terms of their personality, is night and day. Being in the Hall of Fame is one thing. Your legacy among fans of the game is another.

      Your legacy among fans is subjective. I never saw Ty Cobb play and, before I knew anything about his racism and lousy personalilty, I only knew that Pete Rose broke a record that had stood since before my grandmother was born.

      I love A-Rod. You hate A-Rod. Our views of his legacy are colored by our respective opinions. You’re basically trying to argue that your opinion is the universal opinion and that if A-Rod does this one act to please you, everyone else will fall into line.

      Unfortunately it doesn’t work that way. Whereas you might change your mind on him, others may not. Moreover, whereas you may never change your mind on him, others still may.

    10. MJ Recanati
      May 22nd, 2012 | 1:57 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      Well, if the money paid didn’t matter, then I guess, to you, it didn’t matter that Carl Pavano sucked with the Yankees?

      Money has nothing to do with legacy. Carl Pavano’s legacy in New York is that he sucked. Plenty of other players have sucked in New York, some that made less than Pavano and some that made more.

    11. #15
      May 22nd, 2012 | 2:51 pm

      It’s way too early to think he’s completely done. Is he ever going to be 40/135 again? Probably not. Likely not. Almost certainly not. Is he going to be worth what they are paying him? Probably not. Likely not. Almost certainly not. Can he be a servicable, above average performing 3rd baseman and both sides of the game for several more years? Probably so. Likely so. Almost…. Well, okay, not almost certainly so.

      I have to say, the number of balls the Yankees have had die on the track is frustrating as hell. I thought the Reds outfielders looked like jittery lost sheep chasing after fly balls, but somehow made catches. The turned every possible way of some balls and reached up blindly at the last second before hauling ‘em in. The number of catches in the OF on hard hit balls by the Yankees is tough to watch. Especially while our fill-in corner outfielders are so sloppy. Granderson has played very good D to my eye.

      Right now the Yankees are no fun to watch. The appear to be gripping. Jeter seems loose, but that’s about it. Swisher takes 1 more half hack at a pitch and I’m turning off the TV next time he comes up. Tex is lost. Grandy too. Robbie showing some signs of life come but it waxes and wanes from AB to AB, and he’s certainly not locked in.

    12. May 22nd, 2012 | 3:00 pm

      Corey Italiano wrote:

      If Derek Jeter can turn around his age 36-37 season, I think A-Rod can too.Why not?

      Interesting question. I think part of the issue is that Jeter never had holes in his swing. He could always handle any pitch location and still get a single. And, he’s a singles hitter. He just got messed up, pressing, for that 3,000th hit. The adjustment to get back to being a good singles hitter was not that big, for him.

      A-Rod had holes in his swing – even when he was great. And, if you could hit those holes, you could get him out. Now, you can still get him out on those holes – and, when you miss, he still hits it – but it doesn’t do much.

      In fact, I worry about this – with it creeping into his head. How long until it messes with him to the point where he decides that he needs some help? And, if he does go the route of PEDs, how long until he gets busted for them? And, if he gets busted for PEDs, then the poop really hits the fan.

    13. May 22nd, 2012 | 3:03 pm

      #15 wrote:

      It’s way too early to think he’s completely done. Is he ever going to be 40/135 again? Probably not. Likely not. Almost certainly not. Is he going to be worth what they are paying him? Probably not. Likely not. Almost certainly not. Can he be a servicable, above average performing 3rd baseman and both sides of the game for several more years? Probably so. Likely so.

      Yeah, but at $23 million a year. Would it not be better for the Yankees to apply that money towards someone who is actually a star and then sign a “servicable, above average performing 3rd baseman” for something closer to half of what they are paying A-Rod? You should not be paying $114 million for 5 years of an OPS of 800 or less.

    14. MJ Recanati
      May 22nd, 2012 | 3:47 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      Would it not be better for the Yankees to apply that money towards someone who is actually a star and then sign a “servicable, above average performing 3rd baseman” for something closer to half of what they are paying A-Rod?

      How do you suggest the Yankees go about removing Rodriguez from the roster without paying most of that money to him anyway?

    15. May 22nd, 2012 | 4:05 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      How do you suggest the Yankees go about removing Rodriguez from the roster without paying most of that money to him anyway?

      By him pulling a Gil Meche.

    16. MJ Recanati
      May 22nd, 2012 | 4:43 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      By him pulling a Gil Meche.

      Not gonna happen. And, again, Meche only left one year of his contract on the table.

      No player should (or would) leave five years before the expiration of their contract. That would be foolish.

    17. May 22nd, 2012 | 4:49 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      That would be foolish.

      Only in terms of the pocketbook. Perhaps not in terms of the legacy.

    18. agsf
      May 22nd, 2012 | 5:33 pm

      “To us, that’s a lot of money. To the uber-wealthy, there’s no reason to leave money on the table. None of us would ever leave money on the table so there’s no reason to ask Rodriguez to do the same.”

      You can only speak for yourself, not us. Maybe money is the be all end all to you, and you would always take the job, move to the new city, leave your family, etc. where you’d get paid the most. But shockingly plenty of people leave money on the table for one of many reasons. If you think hard enough I’m sure you can come up with a few.

      “His legacy is secure, irrespective of his declining performance.”

      His big picture legacy is secure. He’s go HoF numbers, he’s got a WS championship. And retiring would never take away the negatives either. And maybe his last few years are decent, just a slow fade stat wise. But there’s certainly a scenerio where his body starts to fall apart, his stats drop steeply, and Yankee fans, upset with the money he makes, boo him every time he comes off the bench.

      That would affect his legacy to many, with the exception being those that love Arod and in who’s eyes he can do no wrong, like yours.

    19. throwstrikes
      May 22nd, 2012 | 5:44 pm

      So A-Rod should retire so Steve thinks he’s a nice guy even though he still loves to play and is capable of performing better than the majority of players. Can you hear me laughing where you are?

    20. redbug
      May 22nd, 2012 | 6:09 pm

      @ agsf:

      I wonder about his body already falling apart. The other night he didn’t slide home. I can’t recall the last time I saw him lunge for a foul ball. Is he protecting that hip or some other part of his body?

    21. Raf
      May 22nd, 2012 | 6:20 pm

      Funny that people still think Rodriguez gives a damn what they think. He’ll walk away when he’s ready and not a moment sooner.

      He makes headlines for sunbathing in Central Park and having his gf feed him popcorn during the Super Bowl.

      He ain’t going anywhere.

    22. #15
      May 22nd, 2012 | 6:41 pm

      He might consider it if it’s obvious in a few years that the big milestones ain’t gonna happen. But, at a minimum, he’d want a buy out for ~ 50% of the balance. The Yankees should, of course, take it.

    23. Garcia
      May 22nd, 2012 | 7:39 pm

      I may not be ARod’s biggest fan, but he’d be a fool if he did what Steve is suggesting. He might be a martyr for some if he took Steve’s advice, but for a great many, with very little financial resources, they’d be left wondering why he helped make sure the Yankees made even more money. Given the price gouging pholosophy the Yankees have in place, I’d rather see ARod make as much as he can because I certainly won’t reap any benefits from his decision – or rather Steve’s reccomendation.

      Dont get me wrong, I certainly feel Steve’s heart is in the right place, but if the Yankees don’t want him then they should release him. I’d be happy with that decision, and it would be great if he took Tex with him too. I’m all for blowing the team up.

      Lastly, I think the money and business side of all is not that simple. The owners have no problem screwing over a player, why should the players’ have a different approach regarding the money they are entitled to make? Do you really think their legacy would have a better outcome if he walked out on all that money? I don’t see it, but I won’t stop him either.

    24. May 22nd, 2012 | 8:28 pm

      Oh, please. Haters gonna hate A-Rod — forever.

    25. LMJ229
      May 22nd, 2012 | 9:08 pm

      So glad I was out of the country this past week and therefore was spared the aggravation of losing 6 out of 7 in what sounds like brutal fashion. I can handle losing streaks but, let’s be honest, there is alot to worry about with this team. I know we’ve overcome poor starts in the past but we’ve never done it without Mo and we’ve never faced this much talent in our own division. I know its still early but I just don’t see the Yankees making the playoffs this year. Too much inconsistency in the starting rotation, too much flux in the bullpen without Mo, and too much age in the line-up to get the job done.

    26. Evan3457
      May 22nd, 2012 | 9:23 pm

      One bad week is…one bad week (OK, 9 bad days).

      I said this in 2007, again in 2008, it’s time to break it out again.

      There are two possibilities:

      1) The hitters who are not hitting now fail to hit until it’s too late, or not at all. Then it doesn’t matter what the Yankees do, they miss the playoffs, and this year, they finish last.

      2) The hitters who are not hitting now return to the form printed on the back on their baseball cards. If they do, the Yanks will rally and make the playoffs.

      In 2007, they did. In 2008, they didn’t. 2011? I dunno.

      =======================================================

      As for A-Rod, if the fans boo him mercilessly, he might ask for a trade, but he won’t quit. It’s not in his nature. This I do know: it would take a lot better man than me to leave over $100 million on the table.

    27. Garcia
      May 22nd, 2012 | 10:31 pm

      lisaswan wrote:

      Oh, please. Haters gonna hate A-Rod — forever.

      And haters gonna hate Jeter – forever. Spare us with your incredulity, please.

    28. MJ Recanati
      May 23rd, 2012 | 11:00 am

      agsf wrote:

      But there’s certainly a scenerio where his body starts to fall apart, his stats drop steeply, and Yankee fans, upset with the money he makes, boo him every time he comes off the bench.

      Considering fans already booed him every time he came off the bench during his prime, MVP seasons, I hardly see why booing him now would affect him or represent a departure from precedent.

      In other words, Rodriguez wasn’t appreciated when he was still a great player for the Yankees so being dismissed and criticized now would only be more of the same.

    29. MJ Recanati
      May 23rd, 2012 | 11:19 am

      Raf wrote:

      Funny that people still think Rodriguez gives a damn what they think. He’ll walk away when he’s ready and not a moment sooner.He makes headlines for sunbathing in Central Park and having his gf feed him popcorn during the Super Bowl. He ain’t going anywhere.

      This.

    30. MJ Recanati
      May 23rd, 2012 | 11:20 am

      Garcia wrote:

      Lastly, I think the money and business side of all is not that simple. The owners have no problem screwing over a player, why should the players’ have a different approach regarding the money they are entitled to make? Do you really think their legacy would have a better outcome if he walked out on all that money? I don’t see it, but I won’t stop him either.

      +1

    31. MJ Recanati
      May 23rd, 2012 | 11:22 am

      Evan3457 wrote:

      As for A-Rod, if the fans boo him mercilessly, he might ask for a trade

      He was mercilessly booed in 2004, 2005, 2006 and the early part of 2007. He didn’t ask out then so I don’t see why he’d consider asking out now. The booing — as bad as it will get — won’t be any worse than the booing he got during the 2006 season.

    32. MJ Recanati
      May 23rd, 2012 | 11:27 am

      LMJ229 wrote:

      Too much inconsistency in the starting rotation, too much flux in the bullpen without Mo, and too much age in the line-up to get the job done.

      This has been said at every other point in time that the Yankees got off to slow starts (2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009…). In all but one case, the Yankees were just fine.

      Rivera is a national treasure but isn’t critical to the team’s hopes for making the playoffs.

      The rotation is no more inconsistent than it was from 2004-2011.

      The lineup actually isn’t old. Only two regulars are over the age of 32. That’s narrative that we’ve been hearing for years but it just isn’t the case. Teixeira (32) and Martin (29) may be performing like old men but there are plenty of productive older players (Ibanez, 40) and plenty of unproductive ones (Frankie Cervelli, however old that bum is).

    33. May 23rd, 2012 | 9:35 pm

      Garcia wrote:

      And haters gonna hate Jeter – forever. Spare us with your incredulity, please.

      What the bleep is your problem, dude? Next time you want to be a snotty jerk, get a dictionary and learn what the word “incredulity” means. It doesn’t mean what you think it does. Nor does it have anything to do with Derek Jeter. Get over yourself.

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