• Bad To The Bone

    Posted by on July 19th, 2012 · Comments (14)

    Jay Buhner lets loose on the Mariners -

    Former Mariners outfielder Jay Buhner is one of the most beloved players in the history of the franchise where fan opinion is concerned. And Buhner has long been a staunch supporter of the organization and its moves, almost morphing into a goodwill ambassador of sorts.

    That’s why, the interview he gave earlier today on ESPN 710 Seattle’s Brock and Salk show was, well, kind of stunning in its frankness.

    When the radio hosts were talking about an Ichiro extension, Salk asked Buhner what his reaction would be if Ichiro was brought back for three years, $35 million or $40 million — which works out to just over half (well, OK, more like 60 percent on the low end and 73 percent on high end) of the salary he’s now earning.

    “I’d vomit,” Buhner said. “I mean, really, no offense. No offense, we’ve got to get this organization turned around. You can’t be spending all the money on one guy.”

    Buhner went on to say that he doesn’t necessarily blame Ichiro for all the team’s problems. He said he’d understand if the Mariners wanted to bring him back “as part of the equation” and have a fit on a rebuilding squad.

    “But at the same time, they need help desperately,” Buhner said. “They need some veteran leadership in the clubhouse. Wedgie (manager Eric Wedge) can’t keep growing the beard, growing the mustache, shaving it off, that’s not the answer.”

    Buhner went on to say he’s a big Wedge fan, but that “quite frankly, he’s exposed” and needs help from within the organization. There are too many nights, he said, when the player matchups at Wedge’s disposal and the inconsistency of younger hitters just isn’t working out for him.

    “He’s trying to change the culture of the clubhouse,” Buhner said. “He’s trying to change the mentality and how basicly the organization is looked upon. But the last 10 years, it’s been tough.

    “Look at the revolving door that’s been going on around there,” Buhner said. “What, seven managers in the last 10 years? GMs, what are you supposed to buy into?”

    Buhner was asked about how the Mariners would view his comments. He joked that he expected a call from folks wonderng about the “chip” he’s carrying on his shoulder towards the team.

    “That’s what you need,” Buhner said. “You need some people in there with a chip on their shoulder. Some people in there that are proud to wear the Seattle Mariners uniform. And I’m not seeing that as much anymore. Guys that are going in, heart breaking up. I mean, just play with an attitude, man, that’s what I want to see. Guys that are enjoying what they’re doing, playing with an attitude and getting better. Just get better. Show me some signs.”

    All I can say to this is…

    Wow.

    Comments on Bad To The Bone

    1. KPOcala
      July 19th, 2012 | 5:43 pm

      Worst trade in Yankee history, giving up Bones?

    2. MJ Recanati
      July 20th, 2012 | 8:23 am

      KPOcala wrote:

      Worst trade in Yankee history, giving up Bones?

      Worst trade in my lifetime as a Yankees fan. I don’t know what may have happened before I was born and became a fan but, for me, that Phelps-for-Buhner swap stunk at the time they made the deal and panned out exactly as anyone would’ve imagined.

      George Steinbrenner=moron.

    3. July 20th, 2012 | 8:53 am

      It’s too bad that Big Stein isn’t afforded the Cashman blanket defense of “It seems like the right trade, at the time.”

    4. MJ Recanati
      July 20th, 2012 | 9:05 am

      Steve L. wrote:

      It’s too bad that Big Stein isn’t afforded the Cashman blanket defense of “It seems like the right trade, at the time.”

      That trade didn’t even qualify for such an argument. I wasn’t even a teenager at the time and even I knew that was a dumb trade.

      Nice try taking another swipe at Cashman when he had nothing to do with this recent line of conversation though. I guess you’ve got your quota to fill…

    5. July 20th, 2012 | 9:28 am

      Look at Buhner’s stats when he was with the Yankees. He looked like a poor man’s Dave Kingman. And, then look at what Phelps was doing in Seattle.

      Cashman would have made that trade in a minute.

    6. Evan3457
      July 20th, 2012 | 10:51 am

      Steve L. wrote:

      It’s too bad that Big Stein isn’t afforded the Cashman blanket defense of “It seems like the right trade, at the time.”

      The reason why that is is that there’s no reasonable defense for the trade. Not at the time; not looking forward.

    7. Evan3457
      July 20th, 2012 | 10:51 am

      Steve L. wrote:

      Look at Buhner’s stats when he was with the Yankees. He looked like a poor man’s Dave Kingman. And, then look at what Phelps was doing in Seattle.
      Cashman would have made that trade in a minute.

      Oh, horse manure. No way Cashman or his analysts would’ve bought that deal.

    8. July 20th, 2012 | 10:59 am

      @ Evan3457:
      Yeah, the same guys who brought back Javy Vaquez and signed Kei Igawa would never do anything stupid.

    9. Raf
      July 20th, 2012 | 1:18 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Steve L. wrote:
      It’s too bad that Big Stein isn’t afforded the Cashman blanket defense of “It seems like the right trade, at the time.”
      That trade didn’t even qualify for such an argument. I wasn’t even a teenager at the time and even I knew that was a dumb trade.
      Nice try taking another swipe at Cashman when he had nothing to do with this recent line of conversation though. I guess you’ve got your quota to fill…

      It was a legitimate trade. There was a concern about Buhner’s strikeouts, that he had too many holes in his swing. There was also a concern about the Yankees’ predominately RH lineup at the time (Mattingly was the only LH regular). And there was the issue of Piniella vs Buhner; Piniella thought that Buhner struck out too much and would not cash in on his talent.

      Given the Yankees’ proclivities towards veterans, as well as Buhner being blocked at the 3 positions he could play (LF manned by Henderson, signed through 89. RF manned by Winfield, signed through 1990. DH manned by Jack Clark, signed through 1989), and the Yanks needing a bat from the left side, as well as fighting injuries to Mattingly and Clark, among others (remember Clark started a few games in the field, much to his chagrin), it’s easy to see why that trade was made. Of course, no one would predict that Winfield would miss the 89 season, Jack Clark would be traded in the 1988 offseason and Henderson would be traded during the 1989 season…

      Buhner didn’t become a full time regular until 1991, some 3 years after he was traded. Like others before and after him, he wasn’t going to get a shot in pinstripes.

    10. July 20th, 2012 | 1:38 pm

      FWIW, also, Buhner in the Kingdome is more valuable than Buhner playing 1/2 his games in the old Yankee Stadium.

    11. July 20th, 2012 | 9:27 pm

      The worst trade the Yankees made during my time following the team, at least in terms of volume, was with Baltimore in 76. Man did they get smoked. They got Ken Holtzman, Doyle Alexander, Elrod Hendricks, and Grant Jackson (plus an Oriole farmhand) for Scott McGregor, Tippy Martinez, Rick Dempsey and Rudy May (dave Pagan as a throw in). McGregor was a quality lefthanded starter for the next decade, Tippy Martinez was a quality lefty reliever, May won 29 games in his year and a half with the birds (yet another lefty), and Dempsey turned into a fine major league catcher, who was the Oriole starting catcher for many seasons.

    12. July 21st, 2012 | 8:33 am

      Smoked, long term. But, short term in ’76, didn’t the deal help the Yankees?

    13. Evan3457
      July 22nd, 2012 | 12:00 am

      Steve L. wrote:

      Smoked, long term. But, short term in ’76, didn’t the deal help the Yankees?

      Marginally.

    14. Evan3457
      July 22nd, 2012 | 12:01 am

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Steve L. wrote:
      Smoked, long term. But, short term in ’76, didn’t the deal help the Yankees?
      Marginally.

      And isn’t that a “Cashman” excuse?

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