• Are The Fans Unfair With Cashman?

    Posted by on August 1st, 2012 · Comments (23)

    Via Sweeny Murti today -

    The funny thing is [Brian] Cashman just can’t win with the fans. When he gets the big ticket guy, he is accused of being no more than a check-writer who can’t put together a roster without the Yankees’ financial muscle. When he pulls off deals for lesser role players, Cashman is accused of making dumb moves and ignoring the gaping holes that star players should be filling.

    Fans seem to think that the Yankees are sabotaging their chances to win because they are stuck on the upcoming $189 million tax threshold. Does anybody realize that it’s still more money than anybody else is spending? When you build your team around high-priced megastars like A-Rod and Jeter and Teixeira and Sabathia, you have to fill in the rest of your 25-man roster with a little more fiscal responsibility. And when veterans like Raul Ibanez and Eric Chavez can be had relatively cheap, and they produce the way that they have this year, it seems the GM deserves a little credit there too.

    If prospects need to be dealt, Cashman isn’t afraid to do it. But he isn’t of the mind to purge the system for a marginal short-term upgrade.

    Bottom line here is this—the Yankees are always trying to win, but there are times to say no. It’s easy for the average fan to think of the team and each season with a fantasy mentality. In reality, decisions have to be made. You don’t always have to agree with them. But there is a rationale behind them. And there is still a desire to win, even if you don’t believe that to be the case.

    I am a huge fan of Sweeny Murti. I think he’s one of the hardest working guys in his industry and he does a great job. He’s on WFAN, the MLB Network, and…the YES Network.

    And, that last one if the rub here. Murti could be seen here as a hired Cashman Apologist since part of his paycheck is coming from the Yankees.

    In any event, I think there is a major flaw in this defense of Cashman. 

    With Cashman, you need to look at the whole picture and do some root cause analysis on his moves as well.  And, this is not a matter of the fans having to choose if they want Cashman to be a high spender or someone shops for bargain deals.

    A huge part of the reason why Cashman had to spend like crazy was because his team had holes and he had no in-house answers (albeit people in  the farm to promote or trade for replacements).  As I wrote back in December 2008:

    Brian Cashman became Yankees G.M. on February 28, 1998. However, from 1998 through 2005, George Steinbrenner’s troops in his Tampa office (including but not limited to Bill Emslie, Billy Connors, Mark Newman and Damon Oppenheimer) had so much input on personnel moves that it was somewhat difficult to know what exactly what were Cashman’s decisions or not.

    This all changed in October 2005 when Brian Cashman was given full autonomy on running the Yankees. As Cashman said at that time: “I’m the general manager, and everybody within the baseball operations department reports to me. That’s not how it has operated recently.” So, without question, we can look at the state of the New York Yankees over the last three seasons (2006, 2007 and 2008) as well as this off-season (of 2008-2009) and know that what you see is “All-Cashman.”

    And, this includes the recent Yankees spending spree of $423.5 million over the last few weeks to acquire free agents Mark Teixeira, CC Sabathia and A.J. Burnett.

    Why did New York go after these three high-priced talents? Well, it made sense. Coming off last season, the Yankees two biggest needs were starting pitching and a bat for the middle of their line-up.

    With the contract expiration and subsequent retirement of Mike Mussina coupled with the 2008 failure of Cashman’s pitching phenoms Ian Kennedy and Phil Hughes, it was clear that the Yankees 2009 projected starting rotation was full of holes and question marks. (You can add Andy Pettitte’s departure due to free agency to this root cause list if, indeed, he does not re-sign with the Yankees.)

    Further, Cashman’s decision – which, by the way, I agree with 100% – not to bring back Jason Giambi and Bobby Abreu for 2009 left the Yankees without some much needed fire-power in the middle of their line-up. Hence, the need for a replacement.

    And, Brian Cashman’s solution to these problems was to give CC Sabathia $23 million a year, A.J. Burnett $16.5 million a year, and Mark Teixeira $22.5 million a year – thereabouts – all getting multi-year deals totaling $423.5 million (or “close to a half-billion dollars” for those who like to round and prefer not to use the number pad on their keyboard).

    So, Cashman created the holes and Cashman had no answers other than to go out and spend like crazy to address his failures.  And, now, because he has a roster full of guys making tremendous money and an overall payroll that is obscene, Cashman has to shop at the consignment shop to fill out the rest of his roster when he has needs to address.  Again, say what you want about the effect, but, the cause here is Cashman himself.

    Also, let’s not forget that the Yankees still have very few answers again in the minor league level to fill in for guys like Gardner, A-Rod, etc., and that’s why Cashman is forced to look outside the organization to address the issues on his team.

    In summary, I think this is the major gripe that fans have with Cashman.  When the Yankees have issues, the answer is either to overspend to address them or try and fill them with castoffs off the scrap heap.  And, there’s never an in-house answer.

    Think about it.  The current Yankees developed Cano, Jeter and Gardner.  And, Jeter was before Cashman’s time.  On the pitching side, you have Hughes, Nova, Robertson, Pettitte and Phelps.  And, Pettitte was way before Cashman’s time.  Everyone else on the Yankees was either a high-priced free agent, a salary dump trade, or someone out of the bargain bin.  So, how many players has Cashman developed who have played for the Yankees and done well here?  Maybe a half-dozen in all his years?

    There’s also one more thing – the money that Cashman has wasted.  You know the names:  Carl Pavano, Kei Igawa, Chan Ho Park, et al.  And, there are the trades that backfired.  Javy Vazquez or Michael Pineda, anyone?  Those moves don’t make Cashman seem very astute and that’s another reason why the fans get on him.

    O f course, no G.M. is perfect.  They all make mistakes, yadda-yadda.  But, Cashman has resources that few others in the game have at their disposal.  And, yet, even with that perk, he’s still just like all the other G.M.’s who are making mistakes. 

    Think of it this way.  It’s a car race.  And, there are 30 cars in the race.  Everyday it’s a new race.  In terms of results, everyone wins some and everyone loses some.  But, one guy in the race has a Lamborghini Reventón and the rest of the pack are driving Hondas and Toyotas. Is it not fair to expect the guy with the Lamborghini to win more races than the other guys?

    And, if that’s fair, then why is it unfair to expect Brian Cashman to leave the other baseball G.M.’s in the dust?

    Comments on Are The Fans Unfair With Cashman?

    1. Ben M.
      August 1st, 2012 | 12:55 pm

      On the pitching side, I see Joba was omitted. Was that intentional? I still think he can contribute, now that he’s coming back to be exclusively a reliever.

      More disturbing is that the Yankees HAVE developed some players in-house, and they are having (or have had) AllStar-caliber seasons, only on other teams: Melky Cabrera, Austin Jackson, Ian Kennedy, Tyler Clippard. (Is it unfair to now add A.J. Burnett to this list?)

    2. Raf
      August 1st, 2012 | 2:13 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      Think of it this way.  It’s a car race.  And, there are 30 cars in the race.  Everyday it’s a new race.  In terms of results, everyone wins some and everyone loses some.  But, one guy in the race has a Lamborghini Reventón and the rest of the pack are driving Hondas and Toyotas. Is it not fair to expect the guy with the Lamborghini to win more races than the other guys?

      Depends on the type of race. We talking stock car racing? Rally car racing? Drag racing? Autocross? Togue?

      I’m not sure if I’d want to endurance race in a Lambo Reventon, I wouldn’t want to drive one in a togue battle either…

      As for the original question, sure the fans are unfair with Cashman, but I wouldn’t expect them to know any better. You’re supposed to fill out your roster on the cheap. Your last man on the bench or the last man on the pitching staff isn’t going to be a high priced free agent. The game doesn’t work that way.

      Cashman is doing the same thing Yankee GM’s have done before him (and probably will do after). I remember Terry Mulholland being a bust. I remember Mike Witt resigning and being a bust. Dave LaPoint, Andy Hawkins, Pascual Perez, busts. Brien Taylor, Matt Drews, Tyrell Godwin, busts. Kats Maeda? Bust. The unfairness comes when people don’t recognize that.

      As for the money, how and why people continually make this argument is beyond me; it’s disingenuous.

      MLB Highest Paid Player
      1990: 1. Robin Yount (MIL) $3,200,000
      1996: 1. Cecil Fielder (DET) $9,237,500
      1998: 1. Gary Sheffield (FLA) $14,936,667

      As the years have gone, teams have thrown more and more money at players. The salary structure now is a lot different than it was then.

      And it’s silly to complain about salaries, then marvel at the “core four” staying together for so long. Jeter, Posada, Pettite, Rivera, Williams, etc, aren’t or weren’t going to play for the league minimum.

      Also to add, how bout them Marlins?

      The Yanks have made the playoffs every year (save 2008) since 1995. That’s all you need to know. Success costs. The Braves stopped spending money, their streak ended in 2006

    3. Scout
      August 1st, 2012 | 5:36 pm

      It’s a damn shame that Cashman-bashing is not an Olympic event, because Steve would be a lock for the gold! USA! USA! USA!

    4. Evan3457
      August 1st, 2012 | 7:51 pm
    5. Evan3457
      August 1st, 2012 | 7:52 pm

      OK, Embed is not allowed, let’s try the linkee:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uS2nWLz-AbE

    6. LMJ229
      August 1st, 2012 | 10:19 pm

      @ Evan3457:
      Hey thanks Evan. Forgot about that song. Just added it to my iPod :)

    7. Raf
      August 2nd, 2012 | 6:50 pm

      Familiarity breeds contempt; remember Cashman’s been here since 98. Fans got tired of Torre after a while too.

    8. Greg H.
      August 2nd, 2012 | 8:27 pm

      This.
      Raf wrote:

      The Yanks have made the playoffs every year (save 2008) since 1995. That’s all you need to know. Success costs. The Braves stopped spending money, their streak ended in 2006

    9. McMillan
      November 18th, 2012 | 9:29 pm

      “[Cashman] isn’t of the mind to purge the system for a marginal short-term upgrade.”

      He has exercised restraint in dealing minor league talent. But it is also true, that in his fifteen years as General Manager, he has not executed a better trade than either of the Bobby Abreu or Nick Swisher deals, and that is hardly a great record. Most recently, the players Detroit acquired in the same deal in which Cashman brought in Granderson – Austin Jackson and Max Scherzer, played no small roles in eliminating New York in 2012.

      I given him credit for not having a “Jay Buhner for Ken Phelps” trade on the books, at least that I can recall, but the farm system has not produced the level of talent it has in the past. And he has not pulled of the kind of deals his predecessors did in the 1990s that formed the foundation for the franchise’s success well into the next decade.

    10. McMillan
      November 18th, 2012 | 9:35 pm

      “Familiarity breeds contempt; remember Cashman’s been here since 98. Fans got tired of Torre after a while too.”

      Not as “tired” as Paul Quantrill or Scott Proctor got of Torre; two careers he ruined through overuse. If Torre doesn’t pitch Quantrill in every other game in 2004, the bullpen holds up against Boston in the post season. Torre and Cashman – Where would they be without those responsible for building the foundation of the N.Y. Yankees organization in early and mid 1990s? “Clueless Joe” and Mary Cashman’s lesser half really stepped in it.

      @ Raf:

    11. McMillan
      November 18th, 2012 | 10:00 pm

      “Again, say what you want about the effect, but, the cause here is Cashman himself.”

      Agreed. The team is a mess, and Cashman is the cause. The financial resources at his disposal have far exceeded those of any organization since the time he became G.M. and when New York did NOT have the highest payroll in M.L.B. and had the best team (125 combined wins) in 1998. In his time as G.M. – 15 years, he has not pulled off a single trade of the caliber of the Tino Martinez or David Cone trades of the 1990s, the organization has not cultivated talent in its farm system as it had previously (e.g. Kelly, Jeter, Pettite, Williams, Rivera, Posada), and he has been solely responsible for some of the worst contracts in the history of M.LB. – Kei Igawa, Carl Pavano, and A.J. Burnett.

      Cashman will enter 2013 having won only one world championship in the last 11 years while having outspent most other organizations in baseball by more than 100%, with contractual obligations exceeding $23 million in annual salary to his no. 1 starter, $26 million in annual salary to his 38-year-old third baseman, and $22.5 million in annual salary to his .251-hitting first baseman, and $15 million in annual salary to his .232-hitting center fielder that struck out a record 195 times in 2012. In 2013, he will have a 39 year old short stop and a 43 year old closer and a farm system as barren as any in baseball.

      As of November, 2012, Cashman does not have a No. 2 starter in place, or a catcher, or a right fielder. He also lost a reliever that went 2-1 with 42 saves and a 2.26 E.R.A. in 2012 – a reliever the organization had signed over his own objections. For fans of the team, at least there is Derek Jeter’s pursuit of history to look forward to.

    12. McMillan
      November 18th, 2012 | 10:13 pm

      ‘Cashman is doing the same thing Yankee GM’s have done before him (and probably will do after). I remember Terry Mulholland being a bust. I remember Mike Witt resigning and being a bust. Dave LaPoint, Andy Hawkins, Pascual Perez, busts. Brien Taylor, Matt Drews, Tyrell Godwin, busts. Kats Maeda? Bust. The unfairness comes when people don’t recognize that.”

      You’re being very selective. Can you point out some busts from 1975 – 1981? Or 1993 – 1999? Besides Terry Mulholland? can point out more busts in 2002 – 2012 than in both the aforementioned periods combined.
      @ Raf:

    13. Raf
      November 19th, 2012 | 12:26 am

      McMillan wrote:

      but the farm system has not produced the level of talent it has in the past.

      Actually, it has.

      McMillan wrote:

      You’re being very selective.

      You should be the last person to make that claim. There are plenty of busts; Whitson, Trout, Xavier Hernandez, Davey Collins, Omar Moreno, etc, etc, etc…

      McMillan wrote:

      If Torre doesn’t pitch Quantrill in every other game in 2004, the bullpen holds up against Boston in the post season.

      If Rivera saves games 4 & 5, we’re not having this discussion either.

      You may want to look at Quantrill’s & Proctor’s numbers as a whole, minors and majors, before and during their time with the Yanks. Torre didn’t ruin their arms.

    14. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 7:32 pm

      “You should be the last person to make that claim. There are plenty of busts; Whitson, Trout, Xavier Hernandez, Davey Collins, Omar Moreno, etc, etc, etc…”

      I want to hear about the busts from 1974 – 1980; or the busts from 1993 – 1999. I want to hear about how Cashman’s record compares favorably to the organizational management at that time. Or does it? That’s what I meant about being selective. We’ve discussed in numerous posts that the 1980s was a failed decade, and compared numbers associated with those teams to numbers associated with teams under Cashman’s management in the 2000s to illustrate that point.

      So please don’t bring up Collins or Moreno. If Cashman is a G.M. that can be compared to the best this organization has had – not the worst as in the 1980s – then let’s compare the busts from 1974 – 1980, or the busts from 1993 – 1999. What busts were there in 1974 – 1980, or 1993 – 1999 that compare unfavorably to Cashman’s “impressive” track record as G.M.? Its your position that Brian Cashman deserves to keep his job, correct? Why? Because he’s done better than people like Murray Cook who acquired Moreno? Its your argument that Cashman should be retained is because he is a better G.M. than Murray Cook?

      @ Raf:

    15. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 7:48 pm

      “… The farm system has not produced the level of talent it has in the past. Actually, it has.”

      Is that right? Its producing talent on par with Williams, Jeter, Posada, Pettitte, Rivera, etc., and has been doing so since 1998 when Cashman became G.M. Or was it 2005? What talent might that be?

      @ Raf:

    16. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 7:58 pm

      “You may want to look at Quantrill’s & Proctor’s numbers as a whole, minors and majors, before and during their time with the Yanks. Torre didn’t ruin their arms.”

      Why would someone have to look at Paul Quantrill’s minor league numbers to see the effect the mismanagement of his role under Torre had on his arm and career?

      These are not my words, and I did not come across them before today:

      “Quantrill was finished following the 2004 season. On July 2, 2005, Cashman sent him to San Diego, who released him at the end of August. The Florida Marlins signed him for the remainder of the season, but cut him loose when the season ended.

      Brian Cashman has the easiest job in the world. He has more money to spend than any other general manager. It doesn’t take a Branch Rickey to acquire Mark Teixeira, C.C. Sabathia, and the much maligned A.J. Burnett for approximately $423 million.

      It’s fortunate that Brian Cashman’s job doesn’t’ depend on the trades he makes.”

      http://bleacherreport.com/articles/653452-yankees-brian-cashman-should-examine-his-own-actions

      @ Raf:

    17. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 8:08 pm

      Brian Cashman’s father was a personal friend of the Steinbrenner family. That explains a lot, doesn’t it? That explains it all…

      “In Dec. 2003, the son of a Kentucky horse trainer who was friends with George Steinbrenner [, Brian Ca
      Cashman], signed the 35-year-old Paul Quantrill to a $3 million contract.

      http://bleacherreport.com/articles/653452-yankees-brian-cashman-should-examine-his-own-actions

      @ Raf:

    18. Raf
      November 19th, 2012 | 8:33 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      want to hear about the busts from 1974 – 1980; or the busts from 1993 – 1999.

      I’ve listed them, twice. There’s also Ralwey Eastwick, Andy Messersmith, Jose Cruz Sr, Tommy John his last go-round, Steve Kemp, there’s plenty from 1974-99 in free agency, trades and drafts if you cared to look.

      McMillan wrote:

      Its your argument that Cashman should be retained is because he is a better G.M. than Murray Cook?

      At this point, I don’t think you know what your argument is.

      McMillan wrote:

      Why would someone have to look at Paul Quantrill’s minor league numbers to see the effect the mismanagement of his role under Torre had on his arm and career?

      Quantrill’s workload under Torre was consistent with his career, having led the leagues in appearances 3 years before he came to NY. Even while with NY he claimed he didn’t mind the workload, this despite the knee injury suffered in Japan.

      He could’ve hung on for a few more years, but decided to retire to spend time with his family.

    19. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 9:39 pm

      “I’ve listed them, twice. There’s also Ralwey Eastwick, Andy Messersmith, Jose Cruz Sr, Tommy John his last go-round, Steve Kemp, there’s plenty from 1974-99 in free agency, trades and drafts if you cared to look.”

      With all due respect, I don’t believe you have. I wouldn’t call Eastwick a bust in that expectations were never quite that high for him. Why was Andy Messersmith a bust? He suffered an injury.

      Jose Cruz Sr. did an excellent job as a pinch hitter and role player for that team in 1988 – he was anything but a bust, and Tommy John’s first go-around was in the late 1970s which was one of the periods I had requested you point out “busts” from, if you’ll recall.

      Steve Kemp is also from the 1980s and he was injured as well – by a line drive off of the bat of Omar Moreno in batting practice that hit him in the eye. For that, you’re going to call him a bust?

      I asked that you provide me with “busts” from the periods 1974 – 1980, and 1993 – 1999 so as to compare the records of G.M.s from those years to Cashman’s, because its apparently your position that Brian Cashman is perhaps the best G.M. the team has had in the last fifty years.

      If you’ll recall, I said the 1980s was a decade of incompetence as far as the organization is concerned, much like the 2000s. But you said there have been more busts by other G.M.s, or words to that effect, so I would like to know of the busts from 1974 – 1980, and 1993 – 1999, other than Eastwick…

      @ Raf:

    20. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 9:48 pm

      “At this point, I don’t think you know what your argument is.”

      My argument is that the failure of Cashman’s “All-Or-Nothing Big Hairy Monster Team” is the responsibility of Cashman and no one else, and that as one one of the worst G.M.s in M.L.B. he would have been replaced quite some time ago were it not for the fact that his father was a close personal friend of George M. Steinbrenner, and Cashman’s record supports supports this position.

      You said it yourself that the best trades he’s executed in 15 years were for Abreu, Swisher, Clemens, and Knoblauch – that is a pretty pathetic record. These were not bad trades, but in 15 years with an organization such as the New York Yankees, one would think he might have managed to execute one trade that could be recognized or cited as one of the better in the organization’s recent history. I gave you a number of examples from the 1970s and 1990s of such trades. The Abreu, Swisher, Clemens, and Knoblauch trades are pedestrian. They would have won with Wells and Lloyd in place of Clemens; they won 125 games all together in 1998 in the year prior without Clemens.

      @ Raf:

    21. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 9:54 pm

      “Quantrill’s workload under Torre was consistent with his career, having led the leagues in appearances 3 years before he came to NY. Even while with NY he claimed he didn’t mind the workload, this despite the knee injury suffered in Japan.
      He could’ve hung on for a few more years, but decided to retire to spend time with his family.”

      He “claimed” he didn’t mind the workload. Torre mismanaged Quantrill’s role with the 2004 team, and the numbers don’t lie – its very apparent; over 95 innings pitched that year, and his statistics began to nosedive towards the end of the summer and his arm strength never returned. He had nothing left against Boston, and his career was ruined. Decided to retire to spend time with his family? More nonsense.

      @ Raf:

    22. McMillan
      November 20th, 2012 | 6:22 pm

      Raf,

      It was you statements that offered a comparison of Cashman’s record to the records of previous G.M.s., including their “busts.”

      Cashman has been G.M. for approx. 15 years; the periods 1973 – 1980 and 1992 – 1999 total approx. 15 in years. I had asked you to provide us with: 1. examples of “busts” in the 1973 – 1980 and 1992 – 1999 periods; and 2. examples of trades that Cashman has been responsible for that were “on par” with trades made by his counterparts in the1973 – 1980 and 1992 – 1999 periods. Comparing Cashman’s 15-yr. record to the 15 yrs. from 1973 – 1980 and 1992 – 1999 should be fair – 15 years is a long time.

      First, your responses to the first part of the question (so-called “busts):

      Steve Kemp.

      Kemp was a free agent signed in 1982 (not signed in either of the 1973 – 1980 or 1992 – 1999 periods). And Kemp was not a bust.

      Kemp had a better spring training than most if not all of the team’s regular players and injured his left shoulder in Toronto in the first series of the 1983 season. As his offensive production was improving throughout the season’s course, his eye socket was shattered by a batting practice line drive off of the bat of Omar Moreno, ending Kemp’s season. However, a Yankees’ G.M. traded Kemp in 1984 for a minor league outfielder by the name of Jay Buhner. Can you given me an example of a trade Cashman has made that was better than Kemp-for-Buhner?

      “Davey Collins.”

      Dave Collins was a free agent signed in 1981 (not signed in either of the 1973 – 1980 or 1992 – 1999 periods). And Collins was not a bust – I’ll be happy to have that discussion as well. Moreno is also from the 1980s.

      Dave Lapoint.

      LaPoint was a free agent signed in 1988 (not signed in either of the 1973 – 1980 or 1992 – 1999 periods). LaPoint signed a 3-yr. contact for $2.5 million. Would anyone like to compare that to Cashman’s signing of Igawa to a 6-year contract for $46 million? To Pavano’s $39.25 million contract? To Burnett’s $82.5 million contract?

      Andy Hawkins.

      Hawkins was a free agent signed in 1988 (not signed in either of the 1973 – 1980 or 1992 – 1999 periods). Hawkins signed a 3-yr. contact for $3.6 million. Would anyone like to compare that to Cashman’s signing of Igawa? Pavano? Burnett? etc.? Whitson is also from the 1980s.

      Jose Cruz Sr.

      Cruz was signed a free agent signed n 1988 (not signed in either of the 1973 – 1980 or 1992 – 1999 periods). Cruz was signed to be a left-handed bat off the bench. Would anyone like to compare that signing to Cashman’s signing of the injury-prone left-handed D.H. Nick Johnson? There are “busts,” and then there are BUSTS.

      Pascual Perez

      Perez was signed as a free agent in 1989 (not signed in either of the 1973 – 1980 or 1992 – 1999 periods).

      If “there’s plenty [of free agent 'busts' or bad contracts] from 1974-99 if [we] cared to look,” I am not aware of them – omitting 1980s from the analysis, of course.

      Second, your responses to the second part of the question, the so-called “trades on par with those that built the great championship teams of the 1970s and 1990s:”

      Roger Clemens.

      Acquiring a “great” name in a trade does not necessarily mean that the trade itself was “great.”

      In the 1999 trade, N.Y. acquired a 37-year-old right-handed starter with a 20 – 6 1998 record for: 1. a 36-year-old left-handed startter with an 18 -4 1998 record; PLUS 2. one of the top left-handed relief specialists at the time; PLUS 3. a very good young utility infielder. Further, Cashman tampered with the chemistry of a team that had won 125 games in 1998 in the process.

      David Justice, Bobby Abreu, and Nick Swisher

      See comments below.

      Steve Trout

      Trout was traded to N.Y. in 1987 (not traded in either of the 1973 – 1980 or 1992 – 1999 periods). See comments below.

      Xavier Hernandez

      1 trade in the 1992 – 1999 period. Hernandez was a bit of bust, but the team did not give up a lot for him (Jean and Stankiewicz), either.

      Not 1 trade referenced above made in the 15-year period of Cashman’s tenure approaches any of the great trades on which the championship teams of the 1970s and 1990s were built – not 1 in 15 yrs; not 1 trade in which a cornerstone player was acquired for a Lindy McDaniel, for example.

      The 1980s was a decade of incompetence; a decade in which N.Y. won more games than any other M.L.B. team, spent more money on payroll than any other M.L.B. team, and had only 1 World Series appearance to show for it – sounds a lot like the 2002 – 2012 period, doesn’t it? That’s why I requested Cashman’s record be compared to that of G.M.s for the 1973 – 1980 and 1992 – 1999 periods; why compare the incompetence of the 1980s to the incompetence of 2002 – 2012?

      @ Raf:

    23. McMillan
      November 20th, 2012 | 7:27 pm

      “On the pitching side… Joba was omitted. Was that intentional? I still think he can contribute, now that he’s coming back to be exclusively a reliever.
      More disturbing is that the Yankees HAVE developed some players in-house, and they are having (or have had) AllStar-caliber seasons, only on other teams: Melky Cabrera, Austin Jackson, Ian Kennedy, Tyler Clippard. (Is it unfair to now add A.J. Burnett to this list?)”

      Cabrera was banned for PED usage in his All-Star-calibre 2012 season; he traded for Vazquez – a pitcher that can not perform in N.Y. Cashman, of course, was quick to comment that the revelation was “no surprise to [him].”

      Burnett signed to a $82.5 million contract in 2009 and is another example of a pitcher that can not perform in N.Y.; the team now pays a substantial portion of his salary for him to be successful on different team in a different league.

      And when the farm system does turn procure substantial talent, Cashman makes trades such as the following: Clippard for Jon Albaladejo; Kennedy and Jackson for Curtis Granderson, Granderson hitting .232 and striking out a club record 195 times in 2012 while Jackson has emerged as a future star in Detroit. And it should be noted Cashman sent these players to Detroit, which will be a playoff contender for years to come; Jackson and Scherzer did not land in Pittsburgh.

      @ Ben M.:

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.