• Players: A-Rod & Swisher Are “Phoniest” Baseball

    Posted by on August 23rd, 2012 · Comments (17)

    Via Bob Wolfley -

    Brewers reserve outfielder Nyjer Morgan was the top choice in a poll of MLB players who were asked to name the most eccentric player in baseball. Sports Illustrated published the results of the poll earlier this summer.

    In this week’s poll, carried in the current edition of SI, Morgan finished an impressive third place in another poll question put to 232 players. They were asked to name the phoniest player in baseball.

    Two Yankees finished ahead of Morgan in this category.

    Third baseman Alex Rodriguez got 26% of the vote, followed by rightfielder Nick Swisher with 14%.

    Morgan was next with 11%, followed by Giants pitcher Brian Wilson (9%) and Reds second baseman Brandon Phillips (5%).

    The magazine notes that most of the votes for Rodriguez (64%) came from players in the American League and 44% of those votes came from players in the Yankees’ division, the AL East.

    Rodriguez also was voted the most overrated position player in the game (July 9 edition).

    Besides Morgan, Wilson and Phillips were among the top six vote-getters in the voting for most eccentric player. So apparently there’s a link in some voters’ minds between eccentricity and phoniness.

    I don’t know if “phony” is the correct word here? But, if it means some combination of being superficial, narcissistic, pretentious and fake…then I think the players got it right.

    Comments on Players: A-Rod & Swisher Are “Phoniest” Baseball

    1. 77yankees
      August 23rd, 2012 | 2:53 pm

      Surprised A.J. Pierzynski didn’t place on the list. But he’s more D-baggy than phony I suppose.

    2. Raf
      August 23rd, 2012 | 5:29 pm

      Love them or hate them, it seems they’re always on people’s minds.

    3. Evan3457
      August 23rd, 2012 | 8:03 pm

      How is this any more significant than the same poll, same results…when was it? Earlier this sesson? Last season?

      I still don’t care.

    4. Garcia
      August 23rd, 2012 | 8:31 pm

      [I]f it means some combination of being superficial, narcissistic, pretentious and fake…then I think the players got it right.

      The thermometer of success is merely the jealousy of the malcontents.
      Salvador Dali

    5. August 23rd, 2012 | 9:40 pm

      Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth.
      - Buddha

    6. LMJ229
      August 23rd, 2012 | 11:43 pm

      I can buy A-Rod as both phony and over-rated. Not so sure about Swisher though. It seems like there are always prominent NY players at the top of all these ridiculous, unmeaningful lists. I would suspect the NY media plays a huge role in overhyping certain athletes which, in turn, leads to a lot of jealousy from other players. The football players all think Eli is over-rated. I’ll take that title along with 2 super bowl MVPs in 4 years any day.

    7. MJ Recanati
      August 24th, 2012 | 9:03 am

      Steve L. wrote:

      Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth.

      This poll isn’t evidence of the truth, this is a poll reflecting individuals’ opinion. Once again you confuse the two.

    8. MJ Recanati
      August 24th, 2012 | 9:03 am

      Garcia wrote:

      The thermometer of success is merely the jealousy of the malcontents.
      Salvador Dali

      Awesome quote, Garcia.

    9. August 24th, 2012 | 9:27 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      This poll isn’t evidence of the truth, this is a poll reflecting individuals’ opinion. Once again you confuse the two.

      Perception is reality in a situation like this.

    10. MJ Recanati
      August 24th, 2012 | 9:36 am

      Steve L. wrote:

      Perception is reality in a situation like this.

      It’s reality to you because you happen to agree with this perception. But, again — and you seem to be having trouble with this concept — opinions and facts are not the same thing.

      Perception is subjective. Two people may perceive things the same way but that doesn’t mean they’re both right. What if a third person perceives it differently? Is that third person wrong because he’s in the minority? Of course not.

      All questions of likability are entirely subjective.

    11. MJ Recanati
      August 24th, 2012 | 9:52 am

      Steve L. wrote:

      Perception is reality in a situation like this.

      I’ll put it into terms that you can relate to.

      Curtis Granderson is pretty much universally liked by his peers, his teammates, coaches, and baseball media personnel. He’s generally perceived as a friendly, charitable person that works hard, keeps his nose clean and enjoys playing baseball.

      You’ve described him as a phony because he uses Twitter and publicizes his charitable works. So, is your perception right? If perception is reality then you must be wrong if everyone else agrees that Granderson is the nice guy he appears to be.

      I happen to think your opinion of Granderson is peculiar and incomprehensible but that doesn’t change the fact that it’s your opinion. There are no right answers.

    12. LMJ229
      August 24th, 2012 | 11:05 am

      Opinions are like assholes – everyone’s got one and a lot of them stink. Not sure who said that but it does appear to be a universal truth.

    13. August 24th, 2012 | 11:07 am

      @ MJ Recanati: You are confusing what I think/feel with what 40% of the players polled think/feel.

      If one or two people think something, it’s questionable. But, when nearly half of the players polled picked A-Rod or Swisher, that’s saying something.

    14. MJ Recanati
      August 24th, 2012 | 11:36 am

      Steve L. wrote:

      You are confusing what I think/feel with what 40% of the players polled think/feel.If one or two people think something, it’s questionable. But, when nearly half of the players polled picked A-Rod or Swisher, that’s saying something.

      Not in the slightest. 40% of the people can all share an opinion but that doesn’t make the opinion fact.

      You don’t like Alex Rodriguez and there are many others like you. You’re all entitled to your opinion but just because you all share that opinion, that doesn’t mean that he is all of the things you believe him to be.

      Once again I raise the example of Curtis Granderson. In this case, you’re in the minority here vis-a-vis your perception of him relative to the “consensus” opinion. I’d imagine you don’t believe any less fervently in your position that Granderson is a phony. So how can you be right (backed by a plurality) in the Rodriguez/Swisher case but also right (but in a minority) in the other case?

    15. MJ Recanati
      August 24th, 2012 | 11:39 am

      LMJ229 wrote:

      Opinions are like assholes – everyone’s got one and a lot of them stink. Not sure who said that but it does appear to be a universal truth.

      Yep (and that’s a good quote too).

      Everyone can hold an opinion on Rodriguez/Swisher. Not everyone has to like those guys. In fact, many can dislike them. But the fact that many may share the same opinion on them does not in any way confirm that they are what they are believed to be.

      We choose to agree with those who share our opinions and we choose to believe that if many share our opinions, we must, in fact, be right. Too bad it doesn’t work that way in matters where there are no right answers.

    16. Raf
      August 24th, 2012 | 12:42 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      @ MJ Recanati: You are confusing what I think/feel with what 40% of the players polled think/feel.
      If one or two people think something, it’s questionable. But, when nearly half of the players polled picked A-Rod or Swisher, that’s saying something.

      And the other 60%?

    17. August 24th, 2012 | 12:59 pm

      @ Raf:
      They all seem to have different opinions and are like the case where only one person has that opinion.

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