• Cashman: This Is My All Or Nothing Big Hairy Monster Team!

    Posted by on October 15th, 2012 · Comments (122)

    Via David Lennon nine days ago:

    The architect of these Yankees offers no apologies for the all-or-nothing attack of the 2012 Bronx Bombers . It’s no happy accident that they led the majors with 245 home runs (the most in franchise history), went deep in a major league- record 131 of 162 games and relied on the long ball for a third of their RBI production.

    This is by design, and general manager Brian Cashman loves what he sees from this power-mad roster.

    “I want a team that walks and mashes,” Cashman said. “And if you can mash and hit home runs, then you can hit singles and doubles, too. We’re not going to hit triples. But we’re built the way we are for a reason.

    “I’m still using the Gene Michael playbook, and this is about getting big, hairy monsters that mash and are selective at the plate. There’s a reason we’re perennially at the top of runs scored.”

    That’s the bottom line, right? There’s no extra credit for taking longer to get around the bases, no additional style points for nifty bunts or dramatic steals.

    When Joe Girardi faced questions earlier this season about the Yankees’ occasional lapses with situational hitting– as he often does — he explained that home runs are just part of his team’s DNA.

    As for runners in scoring position, well, Girardi pointed out that his players don’t need to be standing at second base for that. It happens as soon as they step into the batter’s box.

    “Our bread-and-butter has been the long ball,” Nick Swisher said. “The Yankees have been doing that for years. On some teams, a guy may get a base hit, steal second and then there’s a single for him to score. With us, we might walk and then hit a two-run jack.”

    Great plan. It’s working out really well this post-season…

    Comments on Cashman: This Is My All Or Nothing Big Hairy Monster Team!

    1. October 15th, 2012 | 10:22 pm

      Cashman has no shame, now Gene Michael gets thrown under the bus. I believe it was none other than Joe Torre who referred to the Michael constructed team of the late 90′s, as a team that hit home runs but was not a team of home run hitters. For the rest of the postseason I would start Gardner over Swisher and hope (what else can anyone do at this point) that AROD and Cano can put some decent at bats together (Granderson is along for the ride).

    2. LMJ229
      October 16th, 2012 | 12:00 am

      “I’m still using the Gene Michael playbook, and this is about getting big, hairy monsters that mash and are selective at the plate. There’s a reason we’re perennially at the top of runs scored.”

      Sounds like Cashman is relying on walks and homeruns to score. Yet, if you look at the team’s numbers from their “glory years” those Yankee teams scored more runs while hitting far fewer homeruns than this year’s team. And in terms of walks, this 2012 team is far less selective than those Yankee teams who averaged nearly 100 more walks than this year’s team.

      Like the previous post says, the Michael constructed teams of the late 1990s were teams that hit home runs but were not a team of home run hitters. As a team, they hit for a high average and didn’t strike out nearly as much as this team does.

      This is the team that Cashman built, not Gene Michael.

    3. Evan3457
      October 16th, 2012 | 1:47 am

      Walks are down all over baseball since the end of the PED era. K/BB ratios are much higher. Pitchers are not nearly as afraid to come after hitters now, because the risk is much lower. A lot more hard throwers are around now. These Yanks do draw 100 fewer walks a year than the Dynasty teams of the late 90′s, but they drew 70 more walks than the average AL team, and finished 2nd to the Rays in BB.

      The ’98 Yankees K’d 150 fewer times than this years team, and were 10th in the AL in K’s. Yet they K’d only 6 times fewer than the AL average team. This years team, relative to the AL, was 8th in K’s, and 11 under the league average.

      =====================================

      This team was good enough to finish with the most wins in the league. It was good enough to beat the O’s in the 1st round. Right now, it can’t hit it’s way out of a paper bag. The loss of Jeter is crippling, because he’s the one Yankee who doesn’t hit the way most of his teammates do.

      In spite of Swisher, in spite of A-Rod, in spite of Granderson, Cano is the key. If he doesn’t hit, and hit big-time now, they’re done.

    4. October 16th, 2012 | 7:25 am

      Cashman has to stop playing this “I suckled on the teet of Stick Michael” card that he seems to be always throwing on the table.

      To me, it’s his way of saying “Everyone thinks I am a stupid GM, but, we know Michael was a genius and I learned everything from him.”

      Gosh, he’s so full of it.

    5. LMJ229
      October 16th, 2012 | 10:38 pm

      The bottom line is, Cashman built this team, not Gene Michael. When the Yankees won it all in 2009 I don’t recall Cashman giving Gene Michael the credit for providing the blueprint. But when the team starts to tank, all of a sudden he’s “using the Gene Michael playbook”.

      The fact of the matter is this team does not resemble those “glory days” teams at all. Who are the 4 superstar players Cashman has brought up through the system? Where is the youth? And that team battled every at-bat. They were more disciplined and changed their approach with 2 strikes. These guys all have long swings and refuse to change their approach. They rarely battle.

    6. Raf
      October 16th, 2012 | 10:59 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      These Yanks do draw 100 fewer walks a year than the Dynasty teams of the late 90′s, but they drew 70 more walks than the average AL team, and finished 2nd to the Rays in BB.

      In other words, same as it ever was.

    7. McMillan
      October 27th, 2012 | 5:17 pm

      Cashman is a disgrace in every way; “the general manager ‘tried to have his alleged mistress committed’ before eventually going to the police.”

      http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2096383/Brian-Cashmans-wife-Mary-files-divorce-stalker-Louise-Neathway-says-affair.html

      Kevin Brown; Randy Johnson; Esteban Loaiza; Kei Igawa; Carl Pavano; Nick Johnson; Javier Vazquez; the lists of failed signings and trades are endless. Without his inheritance of Jeter, Posada, Rivera, and Pettitte, he does not field one championship team even with the highest payroll in M.L.B. by far in each season of his tenure – and proof or validation of this last statement will present itself or be evident in the years to come – Cashman will NOT win again without the core of the championship teams remaining. He simply does not have the talent and judgment to do so. He has overseen the deconstruction of the farm system to the extent that it is one of the worst and least fruitful in baseball. And for reasons only the Steinbrenner family and other executives in the organization apparently have knowledge of, he will continue to receive salary increases and contract extensions for years to come while he has not been held accountable to the extent he should have been by the media, and fans continue to pay exhorbitant prices to see “his big hairy monster teams eliminated in the A.L.D.S. or A.L.C.S. to superior talents such as G.M.’s in Detroit, Texas, Tampa Bay, Oakland, Baltimore, and Los Angeles. A disgrace.

    8. Raf
      October 29th, 2012 | 11:28 am

      McMillan wrote:

      Kevin Brown; Randy Johnson; Esteban Loaiza; Kei Igawa; Carl Pavano; Nick Johnson; Javier Vazquez; the lists of failed signings and trades are endless.

      As are the sucessful ones.

    9. McMillan
      October 29th, 2012 | 1:18 pm

      the Giants are what the Yankees want to be — World Series champions. Giants GM Brian Sabean, the former Yankees’ scouting director, was Quinn’s first hire. Dick Tidrow, vice president of player personnel, was a former scout and pitcher for the Yankees. Dave Righetti, the pitching coach, is a former Yankees star. Hitting coaches Hensley Muelens and Joe Lefebvre and first-base coach dRoberto Kelly are former Yankees. So is advance scout Steve Balboni.

      “If you pin Brian down,” Quinn sai, “he’ll tell you the Yankee way ain’t all that bad. Brian is old school. That’s the way we did things in New York. He’s taking the same motto we used in New York. SDSD. Scout, draft, sign and develop.”

      It might have been the New York dictum, but the Giants have perfected it. The Giants’ legacy will be forever remembered, with a flair of New York style.

      http://www.jacksonsun.com/usatoday/article/1664975?odyssey=mod%7Cnewswell%7Ctext%7CFRONTPAGE%7Cs

      http://articles.nydailynews.com/2012-02-09/news/31039517_1_witness-list-perjury-federal-investigators

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/9363845/Briton-blackmailed-Yankees-manager-after-affair.html

    10. McMillan
      October 29th, 2012 | 6:06 pm
    11. McMillan
      October 29th, 2012 | 6:09 pm
    12. Raf
      October 30th, 2012 | 10:55 am

      @ McMillan:
      The Yanks have been competitive every year since 1993. They have made the playoffs from 1995 to 2008, and from 2009 to present. The Giants? Not so much.

      The Yanks have done it through the draft, through international free agents, through trades.

      I couldn’t care less about Cashman’s sex life, mine is more than I can handle. With that said, I can understand why others would care. As for the character issue, perhaps Cashman picked up a thing or three about blackmail from Steinbrenner when he was paying off Howie Spira? ;) :P

    13. Raf
      October 30th, 2012 | 12:50 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      Without his inheritance of Jeter, Posada, Rivera, and Pettitte

      The team he inherited was bounced out of the first round 2 of the 3 years prior to his being named as GM… You may want to take a different approach ;) :P

    14. McMillan
      October 30th, 2012 | 4:59 pm

      Wrong again. The team he inherited in 1998 had had the best record in baseball in 1994, went to the playoffs in 1995 losing the deciding game in extra innings, won a world championship in 1996, lost in the playoffs to the Indians in 1997 because Rivera threw a bad a pitch to Alomar in the final game of the series. The team then won 125 games all together and a world championship in 1998. What G.M. in history has ever been handed a more substantial franchise?@ Raf:

    15. McMillan
      October 30th, 2012 | 6:10 pm

      I am not comparing the competitiveness of the San Francisco Giants franchise from 1993 – 2012, with the competitiveness of the New York Yankees franchise from 1993 – 2012.

      I am comparing the player or personnel development and success of a team that won two-out-of-three world championships in the period 1996 – 1998 (N.Y. Yankees), to the player or personnel development and success of a team that won two-out-of-three world championships in the period 2010 – 2012 (S.F. Giants), and finally to the lack-of-player-or-personnel-development and lack-of-success of a team that has won only one-out-of-twelve world championships in the period 2001 – 2012 (N.Y.Y. Yankees under Cashman) despite having by far the highest payroll and most substantial financial resources in Major League Baseball in each of those seasons!

      They have NOT done “it” (win ONLY one world championship in twelve years while remaining “competitive” in those years) through drafts! They have not done “it” through their farm system. They might have done “it” through the international signing of Hideki Matsu to some extent… but they did not do “it” through Cashman’s international signing of Kei Igawa for more than $40 million – one of the worst contracts in the history of all of professional sports.

      Cashman can do ONE thing and ONE thing only – WRITE CHECKS, and he does not even do that very well. He wrote checks to a woman that was blackmailing him and the story still came out. He wrote checks to his “international signing” Kei Igawa amounting to $640,000.00 PER INNING PITCHED and he pitched to an E.R.A. over 6.00!

      http://complex.kargo.com/entry/view/id/51924/i/2/p/0/?KSID=d4ae42049b882dd2a20d90198fffcdf7

      And one can not compare his actions and the emotional pain and embarrassment this man brought to his wife and children and family – innocent victims – with that of George Steinbrenner paying Spira to dig up some dirt on a multi-million dollar athlete perfectly capable of defending himself. As I said in my original post: the man is a disgrace, his record can not be defended, and this team will not win again unless the Steinbrenner family finally puts its personal feelings aside and replaces him, or authorizes him to write a few hundred million dollars-worth of contractual obligations as it did in 2009…

      @ Raf:

    16. McMillan
      October 30th, 2012 | 6:33 pm

      I forgot to mention having won ONLY one world championship in twelves years since 2001 AND having spent substantially more money in payroll or salaries in each of those seasons than any other franchise or organization in M.L.B. AND having minimal talent in its farm system as of 2012 – but hey – he’s kept the Yankees “competitive!”@ Raf:

    17. McMillan
      October 30th, 2012 | 8:17 pm

      LMJ229 is 100% correct. The only thing I would add is that Cashman can not put together a stable rotation either.

      @ LMJ229:

    18. McMillan
      October 30th, 2012 | 8:40 pm

      How’s this for an approach: of the 25 WORST CONTRACTS in PROFESSIONAL SPORTS (NOT JUST BASEBALL) Brian Cashman – BY HIMSELF (!) – is responsible for 12% of ALL of them, totaling $168,450,000.00 (!) in payroll costs… according to this site.

      http://complex.kargo.com/entry/view/id/51924/i/2/p/0/?KSID=d3c30e2e6cd608d3cad5770222f04663

      http://complex.kargo.com/entry/view/id/51924/i/4/p/0/?KSID=d3c30e2e6cd608d3cad5770222f04663

      http://complex.kargo.com/entry/view/id/51924/i/9/p/0/?KSID=d3c30e2e6cd608d3cad5770222f04663

      Even you could do better…

      for @ Raf:

    19. McMillan
      October 31st, 2012 | 12:28 am

      The worst contract ever given to a pitcher is the contract given to Kei Igawa from the New York Yankees. The Yankees spent $26 million on a posting fee and $20 million on a five-year contract at $4 million per season.

      Igawa pitched a total of 38 games in the majors over two seasons. He started 16 games, pitched a total of 71.2 innings in his major league career. His career Major League ERA was 6.66., his career WHIP was 1.758 and had a WAR of -0.7.

      Igawa pitched in the Yankees system for a total of six seasons. Most of his time was in the minor leagues in the Triple-A level. He was a decent Triple-A pitcher with a 33-22 record with a 3.81 ERA and a 1.297 WHIP. However, he was so poor in his time with the Yankees that they never gave him another chance in the Major Leagues.

      That is the worst pitcher’s contract…ever.

    20. McMillan
      October 31st, 2012 | 1:03 am

      Canó was one of the five prospects offered to the Texas Rangers to complete the Yankees’ acquisition of Alex Rodriguez before the 2004 season. The Rangers selected Joaquín Árias instead.[5][7][8]

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robinson_Canó

    21. McMillan
      October 31st, 2012 | 1:22 am

      When the Kansas City Royals began to seek trade offers for Carlos Beltrán, the Yankees moved Canó to third base in an effort to showcase Canó for the Royals.[5] The next month, the Yankees attempted to trade him to the Arizona Diamondbacks as part of a package to acquire Randy Johnson.[5] He began the 2005 season with Columbus.

    22. Raf
      October 31st, 2012 | 5:53 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      Wrong again. The team he inherited in 1998 had had the best record in baseball in 1994,

      There are some people in Montreal that would dispute that claim.

      Given that the Yankees have more often than not had the best record in baseball, it probably doesn’t mean as much as you’d like it to mean, especially if you want to correlate it to postseason success.

      went to the playoffs in 1995 losing the deciding game in extra innings,

      Blowing a 2-0 series lead, I may add. And losing the deciding game means they still lost. In the first round. Which is what I said.

      won a world championship in 1996, lost in the playoffs to the Indians in 1997 because Rivera threw a bad a pitch to Alomar in the final game of the series.

      Again, they lost in the first round. That makes two of three years that they lost in the first round.

      The team then won 125 games all together and a world championship in 1998. What G.M. in history has ever been handed a more substantial franchise?@ Raf:

      The team then won 125 games after he was named GM. The year prior, it was bounced in the first round. You can’t have it both ways. Try and spin it any way you want, you’re only going to make yourself dizzy.

      McMillan wrote:

      I am not comparing the competitiveness of the San Francisco Giants franchise from 1993 – 2012, with the competitiveness of the New York Yankees franchise from 1993 – 2012.

      Of course not, your claim is weak enough as is. Extending the comparison even further weakens it more. Especially considering that Sabean has been on the job in SF longer than Cashman has in NY

      I am comparing the player or personnel development and success of a team that won two-out-of-three world championships in the period 1996 – 1998 (N.Y. Yankees

      Wade Boggs, FA. Jimmy Key, FA. Kenny Rogers, FA. Darryl Strawberry, FA. Chili Davis, FA. Dwight Gooden, FA. Mariano Duncan, FA. David Cone, Reuben Sierra, Tino Martinez, Cecil Fielder, John Wetteland were all acquired by rebuilding teams, and the fact that the Yankees could absorb their salaries. You’ll probably want to take a different approach there too ;)

      Cashman can do ONE thing and ONE thing only – WRITE CHECKS, and he does not even do that very well. He wrote checks to a woman that was blackmailing him and the story still came out. He wrote checks to his “international signing” Kei Igawa amounting to $640,000.00 PER INNING PITCHED and he pitched to an E.R.A. over 6.00!

      Right. You remember Terry Mulholland? Xavier Hernandez? Brien Taylor? Mike Witt? Makato Suzuki? Hideki Irabu? I do. I also remember the GMs that brought those players in.

      Cano, Wang and El Duque were international signings too. But they don’t fit the narrative ;)

      And one can not compare his actions and the emotional pain and embarrassment this man brought to his wife and children and family – innocent victims – with that of George Steinbrenner paying Spira to dig up some dirt on a multi-million dollar athlete perfectly capable of defending himself.

      Remember, Steinbrenner was a convicted felon. He’s had a well known reign of t(error), making rash, impetuous decisions that hurt more than helped. That he felt the need to dig up dirt on one of his employees says all you need to know about the person. Especially considering that he could’ve released or traded him.

    23. Raf
      October 31st, 2012 | 6:13 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      How’s this for an approach: of the 25 WORST CONTRACTS in PROFESSIONAL SPORTS (NOT JUST BASEBALL) Brian Cashman – BY HIMSELF (!) – is responsible for 12% of ALL of them, totaling $168,450,000.00 (!) in payroll costs… according to this site.http://complex.kargo.com/entry/view/id/51924/i/2/p/0/?KSID=d3c30e2e6cd608d3cad5770222f04663http://complex.kargo.com/entry/view/id/51924/i/4/p/0/?KSID=d3c30e2e6cd608d3cad5770222f04663http://complex.kargo.com/entry/view/id/51924/i/9/p/0/?KSID=d3c30e2e6cd608d3cad5770222f04663Even you could do better…for @ Raf:

      Igawa was legit, and only looks bad in hindsight (you may want to run a search on Igawa on this site). Pavano was a dumb signing, I’ve said as much countless times on this site, but the Tigers were in on him. Burnett, not so much, and the Braves were right there in the bidding process, which drove the contract up. The problem with your sites is that in a rush to condemn, they don’t look at the context in which those contracts were offered.

      Danny Tartabull was not a bad signing. Can’t say the same for Zito.

    24. Raf
      October 31st, 2012 | 6:14 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      The worst contract ever given to a pitcher is the contract given to Kei Igawa from the New York Yankees. The Yankees spent $26 million on a posting fee and $20 million on a five-year contract at $4 million per season.Igawa pitched a total of 38 games in the majors over two seasons. He started 16 games, pitched a total of 71.2 innings in his major league career. His career Major League ERA was 6.66., his career WHIP was 1.758 and had a WAR of -0.7.Igawa pitched in the Yankees system for a total of six seasons. Most of his time was in the minor leagues in the Triple-A level. He was a decent Triple-A pitcher with a 33-22 record with a 3.81 ERA and a 1.297 WHIP. However, he was so poor in his time with the Yankees that they never gave him another chance in the Major Leagues.That is the worst pitcher’s contract…ever.

      Yep, and despite that, the Padres and Brewers wanted him.

    25. Raf
      October 31st, 2012 | 6:23 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      Canó was one of the five prospects offered to the Texas Rangers to complete the Yankees’ acquisition of Alex Rodriguez before the 2004 season. The Rangers selected Joaquín Árias instead.[5][7][8]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robinson_Canó

      McMillan wrote:

      When the Kansas City Royals began to seek trade offers for Carlos Beltrán, the Yankees moved Canó to third base in an effort to showcase Canó for the Royals.[5] The next month, the Yankees attempted to trade him to the Arizona Diamondbacks as part of a package to acquire Randy Johnson.[5] He began the 2005 season with Columbus.

      So?

      http://riveraveblues.com/2010/03/almost-trading-bernie-williams-again-and-again-24637/

      http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=6969063

      http://www.nytimes.com/1999/07/30/sports/baseball-pettitte-s-head-it-appears-is-on-the-trading-block.html

    26. McMillan
      November 1st, 2012 | 1:20 am

      So Cashman did just about everything to move Cano, the best player to have come through this farm system since Jeter or Rivera, and with the talent to become the best second baseman of all time. Cano for Randy Johnson? That would have been a great deal. One of the best talents to come through the system in the history of the entire franchise, for Randy Johnson. Talk about having it both ways – Does Cashman get credit for the “international signing” of Cano, when he did just about everything to move him for what – a 41 year-old pitcher? He apparently had an interest in moving him for Beltran, which is more understandable, but then why close the door on Beltran when he came to the organization asking to play for the team for less money than he had been offered elsewhere? O.K. – so they had the best record in the A.L. in 1994. If you have a daughter, or will some day, would you rather have her married to a man convicted of making an illegal campaign contribution, or one that has subjected her and your grandchildren to the pain and humiliation Cashman has – come on – who are you kidding? I would have fired him just for that – its an embarrassment to the organization. Many people have lost their jobs under similar circumstances. I honestly do not understand why anyone would support this guy, but time will tell: this team has not won since 2009 with the signings of multiple high-profile free agents to contractual obligations in the hundreds of millions of dollars, and the passing of Mr. Steinbrenner, AND IT WILL NOT AGAIN WITH CASHMAN AS ITS G.M. AND WITH HAL AND HANK STEINBRENNER NOT PERMITTING HIM TO SPEND MONEY ON THIS SCALE. ITS THAT SIMPLE. THIS TEAM WILL NOT SEE THE POSTSEASON AGAIN WITH CASHMAN AS G.M. AND WITHOUT THE ORGANIZATION PROVIDING FOR A PAYROLL SUBSTANTIALLY HIGHER THAN ANY OTHER TEAM IN BASEBALL. IT WILL NOT HAPPEN. CASHMAN SIMPLY CAN NOT DO IT. CERTAIN OTHER G.M.s CAN; BUT NOT CASHMAN. HE CAN NOT DO IT. PERIOD. YOU CAN BLAME ALEX RODRIGUEZ ALL YOU WANT, BUT CASHMAN IS THE PROBLEM. Let’s just wait and see because, unfortunately, he is not going anywhere for now. And by the way, Pineda will be another bust of his. Take care, Raf.@ Raf:

    27. Raf
      November 3rd, 2012 | 1:13 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      So Cashman did just about everything to move Cano, the best player to have come through this farm system since Jeter or Rivera, and with the talent to become the best second baseman of all time. Cano for Randy Johnson? That would have been a great deal. One of the best talents to come through the system in the history of the entire franchise, for Randy Johnson.

      I love how you try to crucify Cashman for trying to trade Cano, yet conveniently ignore trade attempts of Bernie Williams, Mariano Rivera and Andy Pettitte. In other words, Cashman is doing the same a GM’s before him, and presumably GM’s after him will do the same. Nothing like the blind fury of Cashman bashers, I tell ya…

      McMillan wrote:

      f you have a daughter, or will some day, would you rather have her married to a man convicted of making an illegal campaign contribution, or one that has subjected her and your grandchildren to the pain and humiliation Cashman has – come on – who are you kidding?

      If you think Steinbrenner’s only transgression or Yankees legacy was making illegal campaign donations, well, I dunno what to tell ya. I’m sure Yogi Berra thought George was a swell guy, that’s why he stayed away all those years. I’m sure it was a classy move firing Bucky Dent in Boston, of all places. I’m sure he was a great guy looking out for Buck and his “fine little family” when he let him go. Fine fella there, manipulating Billy Martin, using him up, as well as all the other managers (or employees in general) working under him. Had he listened to his baseball people, people who had forgotten more about baseball, than he would ever know, the Yankees would’ve won a lot more than they did in the 80′s.

      I couldn’t care less about Brian and Mary Cashman’s sex life, I couldn’t care less about who’s zooming who, especially considering the luminaries that have been affiliated with the Yankees;

      Lee Sinins wrote:

      “Let’s not even get into the “character” of those 1970s Yankees teams. That was as bad a set of characters you could find in a clubhouse, which followed another bad set of characters in the Oakland clubhouses where (Catfish) Hunter pitched. So, if Hunter stands for anything “character-wise”, it’s for the fact that character is meaningless when it comes to winning baseball games.

      It was just as meaningless to the 1970s A’s and 1970s Yankees as it was the pure myth of the 1990s Yankees being good characters, when that clubhouse was filled with the likes of David “Masturbating” Cone, Chuck “Cancer in the Clubhouse” Knoblauch, Paul “5 Year Olds Are More Mature” O’Neill, David “Too Many Things To Say About Him” Wells, Roger “Most Hated Man In NY” Clemens, Jeff Nelson, Karim Garcia, Darryl “Cocaine” Strawberry, Dwight “Cocaine” Gooden and the rest of those bad characters that the NY media wants to falsely claim are a bunch of good guys. And how appropriate it was that the statutory rape crowd was adequately represented by Luis Polonia’s presence on the 2000 WS Champions.

      I’m pretty sure these guys chipped around too. Personally, to me it seems you’re too emotionally invested in this…

      McMillan wrote:

      I honestly do not understand why anyone would support this guy

      Well, if you were being honest, you’d understand. ;)

      Any rational person would see that Cashman isn’t a terrible GM by any stretch. What we have here is the spoiled entitlement of Yankees fans combined with the “familiarity breeds contempt” aspect of a person who has been in the GM position since 1998.

      McMillan wrote:

      Let’s just wait and see because, unfortunately, he is not going anywhere for now.

      Yeah, let’s wait. Because we’ve seen this “Bash Cashman” act before on this site; little of it is based in reality, much of it actually is pretty tired. The Yankees are coming off a 95 win season, a season where they made the ALCS. Of course, if Cashman was such a dunce as a GM, the Yankees don’t win as much as they have, nor do they have a run like they have since 1998.

    28. McMillan
      November 10th, 2012 | 1:58 pm

      Brian Cashman Should Be Held Accountable for Constructing Flawed, Soon to Be Problematic Yankees Roster

      Read more at: http://nesn.com/2012/10/brian-cashman-should-be-held-accountable-for-constructing-flawed-yankees-roster/

      “…this is the mess that Cashman has made for himself. If the Yankees had been more selective in their signings, re-upping on Cano could be viewed as a selective risk because he plays second base. Likewise, the team would probably feel less pressure to continue with Granderson to make up for the declining offense of keystone players Jeter, Rodriguez and Teixeira. Instead, Cashman and the Yankees are likely to dig themselves in deeper — even the ever-sturdy Sabathia should be viewed as a ticking injury time bomb given the number of innings he’s thrown throughout his career.”

      Read more at: http://nesn.com/2012/10/brian-cashman-should-be-held-accountable-for-constructing-flawed-yankees-roster/

      “New York’s problems are not entirely Cashman’s fault, and his autonomy to do his job has occasionally come under question, but ultimately he chose to add to the team’s dysfunction and problematic contracts with more problematic contracts and one-dimensional players.”

      Read more at: http://nesn.com/2012/10/brian-cashman-should-be-held-accountable-for-constructing-flawed-yankees-roster/@ Raf:

    29. Corey
      November 10th, 2012 | 2:01 pm

      The prime example of this is, of course, Alex Rodriguez. After the 2007 campaign, Rodriguez, at the age of 32, opted out in the middle of his massive 10-year contract, demanding another massive 10-year contract. Rather than playing hardball, the Yankees conceded

      ————————————
      why are you reading this nonsense anyway. I can’t possibly read anymore than that.

    30. McMillan
      November 10th, 2012 | 2:30 pm

      Brian Cashman Should Be Held Accountable for Constructing Flawed, Soon to Be Problematic Yankees Roster
      Read more at: http://nesn.com/2012/10/brian-cashman-should-be-held-accountable-for-constructing-flawed-yankees-roster/@ Raf:

    31. Raf
      November 10th, 2012 | 4:44 pm

      Corey wrote:

      The prime example of this is, of course, Alex Rodriguez. After the 2007 campaign, Rodriguez, at the age of 32, opted out in the middle of his massive 10-year contract, demanding another massive 10-year contract. Rather than playing hardball, the Yankees conceded
      ————————————
      why are you reading this nonsense anyway. I can’t possibly read anymore than that.

      Why? Because McMillan has an agenda and will prove it, facts be damned ;)

      Again, I’ve heard and seen “the sky is falling” too much from Yankees fans to pay it any mind. Again, let’s wait and see.

      I’ve posted this before, I’m going to post it again;
      http://www.ussmariner.com/2012/10/29/a-championship-offseason/

      You can win a World Series with Angel Pagan as your best hitting outfielder and Gregor Blanco starting in left field. The Giants just did.

      The Giants didn’t do anything last winter to prove they wanted to win. They didn’t make any significant free agent signings to improve a dreadful offense. They took a team that couldn’t hit and they improved their defense. A year later, they’re World Champs.

      Runs are runs and wins are wins. And it really doesn’t matter how you get them.

    32. McMillan
      November 13th, 2012 | 4:08 pm

      “Cashman has a good rapport with Randy Levine, the team’s president, and Hal Steinbrenner, and therefore Girardi will be held accountable.”

      “Some body is going to have to take the fall, and it always easiest to move the manager (Girardi)… the bottom line here is that you can not move the players… the Yankees are locked into a lot of long-term deals and somebody is going to have to be blamed if the Yankees do not do well in 2013… [THEY WILL NOT BLAME] Brian Cashman because he has a good rapport with the team’s president Randy Levine and the owner Hal Steinbrenner [so] Girardi could be the guy guy… The Yankees have regressed and cannot afford to regress again.

      http://espn.go.com/new-york/mlb/story/_/id/8625655/new-york-yankees-28-questions-joe-girardi@ Raf:

    33. McMillan
      November 13th, 2012 | 4:16 pm
    34. Raf
      November 13th, 2012 | 7:02 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      “Cashman has a good rapport with Randy Levine, the team’s president, and Hal Steinbrenner, and therefore Girardi will be held accountable.”
      “Some body is going to have to take the fall, and it always easiest to move the manager (Girardi)… the bottom line here is that you can not move the players… the Yankees are locked into a lot of long-term deals and somebody is going to have to be blamed if the Yankees do not do well in 2013… [THEY WILL NOT BLAME] Brian Cashman because he has a good rapport with the team’s president Randy Levine and the owner Hal Steinbrenner [so] Girardi could be the guy guy… The Yankees have regressed and cannot afford to regress again.
      http://espn.go.com/new-york/mlb/story/_/id/8625655/new-york-yankees-28-questions-joe-girardi@ Raf:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henny_Penny

      Is there a picture of Brian Cashman out there in which the man AT LEAST LOOKS intelligent?
      http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1161400-new-york-yankees-is-brian-cashman-the-most-overrated-gm-in-baseball
      http://aol.sportingnews.com/mlb/story/2012-02-09/brian-cashmans-alleged-stalker-makes-steroids-accusations
      http://deadspin.com/5845140/the-photos-of-yankees-gm-brian-cashman-that-broke-up-a-marriage
      @ Raf:

      I don’t swing that way, so I couldn’t care less what he looks like… But keep trying :D

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single_White_Female

    35. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 5:09 pm

      Well, Mr. Dombrowski’s Tigers have added Torii Hunter to a team that swept Mr. Cashman’s Yankees in four games (“All-Or-Nothing”?) in the 2012 playoffs, while Mr. Cashman turns his attention elsewhere to replace a right fielder he acquired in 2009 that went a combined 21-for-130 (.162) in the post season since then (“[O]ur bats simply caught a case of ‘Yankee flu’ against Detroit in the 2012 post season…”).

      Nonetheless, Mr. Levine, Messrs. Hal and Hank Steinbrenner, and myself all have unqualified confidence in Brian that he’ll find someone to add to “[His] All-Or-Nothing Big Hairy Monster Team” that will outperform his 2009 acquisition Nick Swisher in future postseasons – assuming the team makes it there… And that he’ll resign his no. 2 starter… And that the Yankees will have a catcher that hits for a higher batting average than .211 in 2013… And that the Yankees will have a center fielder that earns approx. $15 million and strikes out fewer than 195 times in 2013… And that the Yankees will have a first baseman that earns approx. $22.5 million and hits for a higher batting average than .251 in 2013… And that the Yankees will have a second baseman that earns approx. $15 million and hits for a higher batting average than .075 in the post season in 2013… And that Michael Pineda will be an effective short-relief pitcher or at least contribute in 2013… And that the Yankees will have a no. 1 starter that earns approx. $23 million and will not feel the effects of all of the innings he has thrown in recent years in 2013…

      On the subjects of extramarital affairs with mentally-unstable women, poor judgment, etc. – how about David Petraeus for Yankees G.M.? I understand the retired general is looking for work. The Yankees could give Cashman a job in their I.T. department, where he belongs.@ Raf:

    36. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 5:25 pm

      In the news this week: A married man was asked for his resignation by a president after it was reported that the married man had had an extramarital affair with a mentally-unstable woman that had engaged in threatening or unlawful behavior investigated by law enforcement for the purposes of criminal prosecution, and news commentators and persons interviewed or associated with the case expressed heartfelt sympathy for the loyal wife and family members of the married man under the circumstances. The president that requested the resignation was not New York Yankees President Randy Levine, and the married man was not the team’s General Manager Brian Cashman, of course – such behavior is condoned in the New York Yankees baseball organization.

    37. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 5:53 pm

      George Steinbrenner was involved in trade discussions involving Mariano Rivera at one time – not Gene Michael, nor Bob Watson, nor any of Brian Cashman’s predecessors. No one can defend George Steinbrenner’s overall record of player personnel moves or decisions. Incidentally, I believe Stick Michael made his share of questionable moves as General Manager, but he certainly was an asset to the organization for many years in a variety of capacities. “I never said yes,” Michael said with a chuckle… “And right about that time, Mariano’s velocity in the minors jumped to 95-96. I didn’t believe it when I saw our report, but I checked it out with scouts from other teams who were there, and it was true. At that point there was no way I was trading him.” @ Raf:

    38. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 5:59 pm

      It was George Steinbrenner again that was involved in trade discussions concerning Andy Pettitte… Cashman was among a number of individuals that convinced Mr. Steinbrenner not to deal Pettitte at the time…

    39. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 6:06 pm

      It was George Steinbrenner that was involved in trade discussions concerning Bernie Williams… I do not recall any other Yankee G.M. having failed to trade Williams. Rivera, Pettitte, and Williams were all developed before the arrival of Cashman in 1998, and without them… Cashman likely has not one ring.

    40. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 6:15 pm

      You can’t have facial hair if you’re a player for the Yankees; you can’t wear an ear ring; you can’t interact with female fans from the dugout; but bringing negative publicity such as this to the organization is fine:

      http://deadspin.com/5845140/the-photos-of-yankees-gm-brian-cashman-that-broke-up-a-marriage

    41. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 6:50 pm

      You can’t have facial hair if you’re a player for the Yankees; you can’t wear an ear ring if you’re a player for the Yankees; you must wear a business suit if you’re a player for the Yankees if you’re traveling with the team; but bringing personal scandal (http://deadspin.com/5845140/the-photos-of-yankees-gm-brian-cashman-that-broke-up-a-marriage) to the organization is fine if you have a certain relationship with Levine or Hal or Hank Steinbrenner. And other people are held accountable for a G.M. not doing his job if the G.M. has a certain relationship with Levine or Hal or Hank Steinbrenner (http://nesn.com/2012/10/brian-cashman-should-be-held-accountable-for-constructing-flawed-yankees-roster). And Cashman is not doing his job: most recently, the team with the seventh-highest-payroll in M.L.B. swept the team that swept Cashman’s team in an earlier round in the 2012 postseason – Cashman’s team having the highest payroll in M.L.B. (http://espn.go.com/mlb/team/salaries/_/name/sf/san-francisco-giants) and having had the worst offensive showing in M.L.B. post season history in 2012.

      In 2011, the Yankees’ payroll was $85 million more than the payroll of the world champion St. Louis Cardinals – 15 teams had a TOTAL payroll of less than $85 million in 2011.

      In 2010, the Yankees’ payroll was $108 million more than the payroll of the world champion San Francisco Giants – 24 teams had a TOTAL payroll of less than $108 million in 2010.

      In 2009, the Yankees’ payroll was $88 million more than the payroll of the National League champion Philadelphia Phillies, and $50 million more than the next highest payroll in M.L.B.

      In 2008, Alex Rodriguez’s $28 million salary was more than the TOTAL payroll of the Florida Marlins. The Yankees’ payroll was $110 million more than the payroll of the world champion Philadelphia Phillies – 21 teams had a TOTAL payroll of less than $110 million in 2008.

    42. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 7:23 pm

      Steinbrenner’s past transgressions do not excuse Cashman’s conduct. Do you really want to compare George Steinbrenner’s record as a human being to Brian Cashman’s?

      http://www2.tbo.com/sports/sports/2010/jul/13/george-steinbrenners-impact-tampa-community-ar-47906/

      http://www.ontherightinva.com/2010/07/14/the-softer-side-of-george-steinbrenner-part-2/

    43. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 7:26 pm
    44. Raf
      November 15th, 2012 | 7:44 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      Well, Mr. Dombrowski’s Tigers have added Torii Hunter to a team that swept Mr. Cashman’s Yankees in four games (“All-Or-Nothing”?)

      So?

      The Yankees won 95 games to Detroit’s 88, and beat the Tigers in the season series 6-4 (58/48, RS/RA)

      McMillan wrote:

      In the news this week: A married man was asked for his resignation by a president after it was reported that the married man had had an extramarital affair with a mentally-unstable woman that had engaged in threatening or unlawful behavior investigated by law enforcement for the purposes of criminal prosecution, and news commentators and persons interviewed or associated with the case expressed heartfelt sympathy for the loyal wife and family members of the married man under the circumstances. The president that requested the resignation was not New York Yankees President Randy Levine, and the married man was not the team’s General Manager Brian Cashman, of course – such behavior is condoned in the New York Yankees baseball organization.

      I hope you can appreciate the difference between someone who runs a baseball team, and another who leaves classified documents lying around…

      McMillan wrote:

      Incidentally, I believe Stick Michael made his share of questionable moves as General Manager, but he certainly was an asset to the organization for many years in a variety of capacities.

      No one says he wasn’t an asset. And the fact that he made questionable moves means that, wait for it, he’s just like every other GM who has run the Yankees.

      McMillan wrote:

      It was George Steinbrenner again that was involved in trade discussions concerning Andy Pettitte… Cashman was among a number of individuals that convinced Mr. Steinbrenner not to deal Pettitte at the time…

      Who was that again?

      McMillan wrote:

      I do not recall any other Yankee G.M. having failed to trade Williams. Rivera, Pettitte, and Williams were all developed before the arrival of Cashman in 1998, and without them… Cashman likely has not one ring.

      The point was, they were on the block, they could’ve been traded. They weren’t. That was your whole argument about Cano. I simply used your argument against you.

      FWIW, Williams (1985), Rivera (Feb, 1990), & Pettitte (Jun, 1990) were property of the Yankees before Gene Michael was named GM in Aug, 1990. So yeah, you lose there too. ;)

      McMillan wrote:

      You can’t have facial hair if you’re a player for the Yankees; you can’t wear an ear ring if you’re a player for the Yankees; you must wear a business suit if you’re a player for the Yankees if you’re traveling with the team; but bringing personal scandal to the organization is fine

      Right. Cashman is the only person affiliated with the Yankees organization who has brought personal scandal… If you really, truly and honestly believe that, I’ve got a bridge for sale…

      McMillan wrote:

      And other people are held accountable for a G.M. not doing his job if the G.M. has a certain relationship with Levine or Hal or Hank Steinbrenner. And Cashman is not doing his job.

      Actually, he is. You see, the Yankees’ performance over 162 games is what counts, not a handful of games in the playoffs. I hate to break it to you, but that’s the way it is. That’s the way it has always been; that’s why you don’t see a bunch of GM’s changing jobs every year, because they failed to win a championship.

      Care to explain how such a flawed roster can win so many games?

      Keep trying! :D

      PS: Stop including so many links; it’s not like I’m going to read them anyway. Besides, it’s ok to have an original thought or two.

      BTW, it seems you, Mary & Louise are the only people who seem to care about the Cashman affair… Way to go?

    45. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 8:01 pm

      “The Yankees’ performance of 162 games is what counts?” “Not a handful of games in the playoffs?” I’ll disregard all of the thousands of statements by the organization’s executives and management over the years that nothing less than a world championship is what the ballclub sets out to achieve each year as its mission – nothing than a world championship is the organization’s goal – every year I have heard it from the players up to the owners – I’ve never heard them say that the “handful of games in the playoffs” to not “count.”

      Why does Girardi wear a “28″ on the back of his uniform???

    46. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 8:08 pm

      Perhaps if you read the links, you’d see that they do not fit your narrative. As long as you’ve acknowledged that you believe its the team’s performance over 162 games that counts, and not the “handful of games in the playoffs.” Some of us were under the impression that team carried the highest payroll by tens-of-millions-dollars each year in an effort to win a world championship, or at least a pennant, but if what is important to you is that the Yankees win the most regular season games each year, then you have every right to be as satisfied with Brian Cashman’s performance, as Louise Neathway apparently was.

    47. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 8:16 pm

      What makes the roster “flawed,” at least in the opinion of some of us, is that it does not win in October. But you’ve already stated that the “handful of games in the playoffs” do not matter. To some of us, they do. And we would like to see Brian reassigned to perhaps the organization’s I.T. department, or possibly work as an attendant of some kind at Yankee Stadium for the duration of his multi-million-dollar contract where he can do less damage. I didn’t understand that what was important to you was that the Yankees win the most regular season games of any team. But I don’t think he’ll even be able to do that with the financial constraints the Steinbrenners are now imposing on him… I’m sorry to break that to you.

    48. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 8:19 pm

      I’ve provided most of the links to substantiate my original thoughts… and some of the links have been provided so as to respond to what are presumably yours. I certainly have not heard any other professed Yankee fan say that the “handful of games in the playoffs do not count.”@ Raf:

    49. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 8:31 pm

      Thank you for enlightening me. I thought the reason you did not see “a bunch of GMs changing jobs every year” is because some of them actually have a somewhat smaller budget to work within due to the size of their markets and/or parameters set by ownership – not the $200 million “Cash man” has had, and that in the opinion of ownership, these GMs have done a good job maintaining the ballclubs’ competitiveness relative to teams with the financial resources of the New York Yankees, Los Angeles Dodgers, etc., developing a farm systems, and returning a profit. Its a much different model than your “here’s $200 million – “win as many of the 162 regular season games and don’t worry about the playoffs” model.

      But Cashman has seemed to indicate the existence of an organization directive to win a world championship as well? (http://www.nypost.com/p/sports/yankees/tankees_vow_to_rise_again_ezCKsVLLCuitXWlZP9iSpN). Perhaps if you read links, you’d read that “Levine promised that everything will be done to put a team together capable of reaching next year’s World Series.” In other words, to improve the teams performance in the final seven of those handful of games that don’t count.

      @ Raf:

    50. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 8:35 pm

      Gene Michael, in the opinion of some of us that believe the handful of playoff games count, is not “just like every other GM that has run the Yankees;” he was far superior to Ms. Cashman.@ Raf:

    51. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 8:41 pm

      No… There have been many people that have brought scandal to the New York Yankees. But so what? If there is someone associated with the organization at the current time that has engaged in the type of personal conduct Brian Cashman has, I would probably agree with the organization’s decision to remove them – regardless of whether or not they performed as poorly at their job as Cashman has. That’s simply my opinion; you have yours. Just as its your opinion that “the Yankees’ performance over 162 games is what counts, not a handful of games in the playoffs” and such a stance is not consistent with what I estimate to be the vast majority of Yankee fans…

    52. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 8:48 pm

      The point about Cano is that he is one of the most talented players to EVER come through the organization, and Cashman has tried to move him on at least several occasions. Now, people are calling him “The Face of the Yankees.” No one else is being called “The Face of the Yankees” now that Derek Jeter is perhaps in the twilight of his career. Cano is being called “The Face of the Yankees.” How many players have been called”The Face of the Yankees” in the franchise’s history? How many? And Cashman did a lot to try to move him – once as part of a trade for a 41-year-old, 6′-10″ pitcher with a bad back in 2004.@ Raf:

    53. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 8:53 pm

      If its your opinion that Cashman’s job is to win as many of the 162 regular season games as possible, and that the playoffs do not count – then I completely agree with you – he is doing his job. But as I indicated earlier, I do not expect him to win more regular season games than all but a few teams in baseball given a “level playing field” as far as payroll is concerned in the immediate future – he will not be able to do it. And forget about the playoffs – but they don’t count anyway.@ Raf:

    54. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 9:00 pm

      Williams, Pettitte, and Rivera were not “on the block,” George Steinbrenner’s irrational belief that one or more of them should have been traded at one time or another aside. George Steinbrenner was NOT the G.M. I sent you a quote from Gene Michael – once he saw Rivera hitting 95 m.p.h. to 96 m.p.h. he refused to consider an offer for him. I don’t recall reading that a Yankee G.M. from the past tried to trade a Williams, Pettitte, or Rivera for the equivalent of a 41-year-old, 6′-10″ starting pitcher in decline and with history of back problems, only to have the opposing team turn down the deal -do you? As the Arizona Diamondbacks did? When did a Yankee G.M. from the past try to trade Williams, Pettitte, or Rivera for the equivalent of a 41-year-old, 6′-10″ starting pitcher in decline and with a history of back problems, only to have the opposing team turn down the deal? When?

    55. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 9:14 pm

      So what if Williams, Pettitte, or Rivera were the property of the team before Michael arrived? What has that got to do with the fact that the team would probably not have won a championship under Cashman without those players, and under Cashman the team’s farm system has not produced much aside from Cano – whom Cashman tried to deal for a 41-year-old, 6′-10″ starting pitcher in decline and with a history of back problems in 2004? The farm system produced Austin Jackson, for example, but Cashman wasted no time in trading him for a .232 hitter that strikes out 195 times-per-year, along with Kennedy and Coke. The farm system produced Montero, but Cashman wasted no time in trading him for Pineda – another bust. What has the farm system produced as far as the current roster is concerned besides Gardner and Cano? Hughes? O.K. That’s the best the wealthiest franchise in M.L.B. can do?

    56. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 9:29 pm

      “Of course, if Cashman was such a dunce as a GM, the Yankees don’t win as much as they have, nor do they have a run like they have since 1998.”

      Give any GM in baseball the payroll the Yankees have given Cashman to work with, that GM could have put together a run like the Yankees have had since 1998. Either way, he’s still a dunce. Just look at him.@ Raf:

    57. McMillan
      November 15th, 2012 | 9:45 pm

      “BTW, it seems you, Mary & Louise are the only people who seem to care about the Cashman affair… Way to go?”

      Yes, I do care about the “Cashman Affair.” I care about the message it sends millions of kids that follow the team, for one thing. Just as I care about the message the use of PEDs sends to millions of kids as well. It sends a number of wrong messages. And I do not like to see ESPN report that Joe Girardi will lose his job in part because he does not have the relationship with Levine or the Steinbrenners that Cashman has. Especially when I see Joe Girardi bringing his wife and kids to his press conferences with him, and Brian Cashman bringing his wife and kids the humiliation and pain he has brought them.@ Raf:

    58. Raf
      November 15th, 2012 | 11:31 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      “The Yankees’ performance of 162 games is what counts?” “Not a handful of games in the playoffs?” I’ll disregard all of the thousands of statements by the organization’s executives and management over the years that nothing less than a world championship is what the ballclub sets out to achieve each year as its mission – nothing than a world championship is the organization’s goal – every year I have heard it from the players up to the owners – I’ve never heard them say that the “handful of games in the playoffs” to not “count.”

      Why does Girardi wear a “28″ on the back of his uniform???

      It is the goal of the Tigers, it is the goal of the Cardinals, it is the goal of the Rangers, it is the goal of every contending team in MLB.

      Only one can win it all. Does this mean that the teams that don’t make it fire their GM’s? No, of course not. You know why? Because it’s the regular season that counts. The regular season outweighs the postseason. The playoffs are a crapshoot. What happened to the 2005 Red Sox? What happened to the 2006 White Sox? What happened to the 2007 Cardinals? 2008 Red Sox? 2009 Phillies? 2010 Yankees? 2011 Giants? Did they forget how to win?

      McMillan wrote:

      Perhaps if you read the links, you’d see that they do not fit your narrative.

      That’s the thing, I’m not looking for a narrative.

      “The narrative fallacy addresses our limited ability to look at sequences of facts without weaving an explanation into them, or, equivalently, forcing a logical link, an arrow of relationship upon them. Explanations bind facts together. They make them all the more easily remembered; they help them make more sense. Where this propensity can go wrong is when it increases our impression of understanding.” —Nassim Nicholas Taleb, The Black Swan

      McMillan wrote:

      Thank you for enlightening me. I thought the reason you did not see “a bunch of GMs changing jobs every year” is because some of them actually have a somewhat smaller budget to work within due to the size of their markets and/or parameters set by ownership

      No, it has nothing to do with budget. Did you not see what happened with the Red Sox? The Phillies? The Marlins? The Dodgers?

      In your laserlike focus on “$200m,” getting stuck on one little detail, you’re missing the big picture. Build a team that gets to the playoffs, anything can happen after that. This applies regardless of payroll.

      The Tigers won the AL Pennant, by your logic, I guess that means they were the best team in the AL, right? Care to explain to me how they could be the best team in the AL when they had the 7th best record in the league? Yeah, you read that right; they finished behind NY, BAL, TB, OAK, TEX & LAA…

      McMillan wrote:

      Gene Michael, in the opinion of some of us that believe the handful of playoff games count, is not “just like every other GM that has run the Yankees;” he was far superior to Ms. Cashman.

      I would hope so, since Mary doesn’t have any experience running a team ;)

      And again, the Watson/Michael teams were bounced from the first round in 1995 & 1997. They won big in 1998, then 199-2000. So what happened, what was the difference from 1995-2007 and again from 2009-2012?

      McMillan wrote:

      such a stance is not consistent with what I estimate to be the vast majority of Yankee fans…

      Your logical fallacy is…
      http://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/bandwagon

      You appealed to popularity or the fact that many people do something as an attempted form of validation. :)

      I couldn’t care less what the vast majority of Yankees fans think (your estimation or otherwise), I’m not one to subscribe to a herd mentality.

      McMillan wrote:

      The point about Cano is that he is one of the most talented players to EVER come through the organization, and Cashman has tried to move him on at least several occasions.

      To which I responded with instances of other talented players (Williams, Rivera, Pettitte) who’ve come through the organization who were attempted to be moved on other occasions…

      And what does it say about other teams that they didn’t jump on Cano, “one of the most talented players to EVER come through the organization?”

      And who’s saying that Cano is the face of the franchise? And even if he is, why is that a problem? Because he’s Dominican? Because he’s dark skinned? Because he doesn’t run hard on every play? Because he makes the game look easy? Because he fits the Latino ballplayer stereotype?

      (you see what I did there? ;))

      McMillan wrote:

      Williams, Pettitte, and Rivera were not “on the block,”

      If they were involved in trade discussions, they were on the block. That the Yankees could not come to a deal does not negate that.

      McMillan wrote:

      I don’t recall reading that a Yankee G.M. from the past tried to trade a Williams, Pettitte, or Rivera for the equivalent of a 41-year-old, 6′-10″ starting pitcher in decline and with history of back problems, only to have the opposing team turn down the deal -do you?

      In the case of Rivera, it was Felix Fermin. I forget, you mind comparing and contrasting the resumes and careers of Fermin and Johnson? ;)

      McMillan wrote:

      So what if Williams, Pettitte, or Rivera were the property of the team before Michael arrived? What has that got to do with the fact that the team would probably not have won a championship under Cashman without those players

      Then by extension, they probably would not have won a championship under Watson and Michael… Next!

      McMillan wrote:

      The farm system produced Austin Jackson, for example, but Cashman wasted no time in trading him for a .232 hitter that strikes out 195 times-per-year,

      *Notes that McMillan conveniently ignores that Granderson hit 40+ HR, and was nowhere to be found when AJax posted a .249/.317/.374 line a year ago… Next!

      McMillan wrote:

      The farm system produced Montero, but Cashman wasted no time in trading him for Pineda – another bust.

      Too early to label that trade a bust. Not to mention that Montero posted a .260/.298/.386, and the M’s are looking to move him off the catching position (for Mike Zunino? John Jaso’s the primary) to either 1B or DH (more likely, DH)… Next!

      McMillan wrote:

      Yes, I do care about the “Cashman Affair.” I care about the message it sends millions of kids that follow the team, for one thing. Just as I care about the message the use of PEDs sends to millions of kids as well. It sends a number of wrong messages.

      You know that PED’s aren’t new, right? You may want to give “Ball Four” a read ;)

      BTW, rarely does “think of the children” work. Kids believe in things like Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny and the Tooth Fairy. As adults, we know better. We have jobs, careers, bills to pay, mortgages, kids to manage, so on and so forth. Kids don’t. As adults we get to make choices that children do not, can not, should not, or will not. Don’t try to turn this around “on the children,” it has nothing to do with them.

      McMillan wrote:

      And I do not like to see ESPN report that Joe Girardi will lose his job in part because he does not have the relationship with Levine or the Steinbrenners that Cashman has.

      Please save your brain cells, stop watching/reading drivel like ESPN, NESN & the NY Post.

      Might I ask you tighten things up a bit? Respectfully, it’s a bit difficult to reply. As you can see, responses get a bit unwieldy. Not to mention those who rely on the “Recently Commented” field to get back to topics that may be buried or have otherwise fallen off the front page.

    59. BOHAN
      November 15th, 2012 | 11:35 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      The farm system produced Montero, but Cashman wasted no time in trading him for Pineda – another bust.

      A bust? why? Because he missed a year? Cant call him a bust yet… What if he comes back and tosses gems left and right and Montero becomes nothing more then a DH? Then is he a bust? Can’t call a trade a bust a year after it happened.

    60. McMillan
      November 16th, 2012 | 8:01 pm

      Major League Baseball Payroll Information, 2002 – 2012
      N.Y. Yankees had highest payroll in M.L.B. each year by tens-of-millions of dollars.
      Most World Series Champions for the period had 50% or less of the payroll of the N.Y. Yankees (only 2 above 50%).

      2002
      1 New York Yankees: $125,928,583.00
      2. Boston Red Sox: $108,366,060.00

      10. San Francisco Giants: $78,299,835.00 (N.L. Champion)

      15. Anaheim Angels: $61,721,667.00 (World Champion)

      2003
      1. New York Yankees: $152,749,814.00 (A.L. Champion)
      2. New York Mets: $117,176,429.00

      25. Florida Marlins $49,050,000.00 (World Champion)

      2004
      1. New York Yankees: $182,835,513.00
      2. Boston Red Sox: $125,208,542.00 (World Champion)

      11. St. Louis Cardinals: $75,663,517.00 (N.L. Champion)

      2005
      1. New York Yankees: $205,938,439.00
      2. Boston Red Sox: $121,311,945.00

      12. Houston Astros: $76,779,022.00 (N.L. Champion)
      13. Chicago White Sox: $75,228,000.00 (World Champion)

      2006
      1. New York Yankees: $194,663,079.00
      2. Boston Red Sox: $120,099,824.00

      11. St. Louis Cardinals: $88,891,371.00 (World Champion)

      13. Detroit Tigers: $82,612,866.00 (A.L. Champion)

      2007
      1. New York Yankees: $189,639,045.00
      2. Boston Red Sox: $143,026,214.00 (World Champion)

      25. Colorado Rockies: $54,424,000.00 (N.L. Champion).

      2008
      1. New York Yankees: $209,081,577.00
      2. New York Mets: $137,793,376.00

      12. Philadelphia Phillies: $96,269,880.00 (World Champion)

      29. Tampa Bay Rays: $43,820,597.00 (A.L. Champion)

      2009
      1. New York Yankees: $201,449,289.00 (World Champion)
      2. New York Mets: $135,773,998.00

      7. Philadelphia Phillies: $113,004,048.00 (National League Champion)

      2010
      1. New York Yankees (surprise!): $206,333,389.00
      2. Boston Red Sox: $162,747,333.00

      10. San Francisco Giants: $97,828,833.00 (World Champion)

      27. Texas Rangers: $55,250,545.00 (A.L. Champion)

      2011
      1. New York Yankees: $201,689,030.00
      2. Philadelphia Phillies: $172,976,381.00

      11. St. Louis Cardinals: $105,433,572.00 (World Champion)
      ..
      13. Texas Rangers: $92,229,165.00 (A.L. Champion)

      2012

      1. New York Yankees: $197,962,289.00
      2. Philadelphia Phillies: $174,538,938.00

      5. Detroit Tigers: $132,300,000.00 (A.L. Champion)

      8. San Francisco Giants: $117,620,683.00 (World Champion)

    61. McMillan
      November 16th, 2012 | 8:28 pm

      “Most World Series Champions for the period had 50% or less of the payroll of the N.Y. Yankees (only 2 above 50%).” – Correction – 4 above 50%…

      Total payroll expenditures – N.Y. Yankees under Cashman, 2002 – 2012: $2,068,270,047
      World Championships: 1

      Total payroll expenditures – S.F. Giants, 2002 – 2012: $1,005,356,285
      World Championships: 2

    62. McMillan
      November 16th, 2012 | 8:35 pm

      Total payroll expenditures – N.Y. Yankees under Cashman, 2002 – 2012: $2,068,270,047.
      World Championships: 1

      Total payroll expenditures – Boston Red Sox, 2002 – 2012: $1,471,386,546.
      World Championships: 2

    63. McMillan
      November 16th, 2012 | 8:44 pm

      Total payroll expenditures – N.Y. Yankees under Cashman, 2002 – 2012: $2,068,270,047.
      World Championships: 1

      Total payroll expenditures – Chicago White Sox, 2002 – 2012: $1,011,661,901.
      World Championships: 1

    64. McMillan
      November 16th, 2012 | 9:10 pm

      “A bust? why? Because he missed a year? Cant call him a bust yet… What if he comes back and tosses gems left and right and Montero becomes nothing more then a DH? Then is he a bust? Can’t call a trade a bust a year after it happened.”

      I was referring to an earlier post in which I PREDICTED that the trade will be considered a bust; of course one can not make such a statement after only when year when such young prospects are involved, Pineda has been injured, etc. However, Campos was injured as well, and the Yankees are now in the position of trying to replace a .211 catcher… Montero behind the plate and Noesi in the bullpen looks pretty good right now for 2013. Instead, the team is shopping for a catcher, waiting to see if Pineda can come back from an injury, and if he will be the pitcher of the first half of the 2011 season (2.64 E.R.A) or the pitcher of the second half of the 2011 season (4.92 E.R.A.). My PREDICTION is that he will not be the No.1 or No. 2 caliber started he was advertised to be, and having watched him pitch I am PREDICTING his future will be in the bullpen and not the starting rotation.

      In other words, Cashman could have done a lot better with by trading what was one of the top prospects in the organization – Jesus Montero – a rookie pitcher with a 4.92 E.R.A. in the second half of his rookie year was the best Cashman could get for Montero? And now Cashman needs a catcher? And, of course, Pineda had to be arrested too for D.U.I. while he was injured… everything else was not enough. Sounds like Pavano, another of Cashman’s “busts” – not being forthright about the circumstances of a car accident he was involved in while injured…@ BOHAN:

    65. McMillan
      November 16th, 2012 | 10:44 pm

      FIrst and foremost, he has outspent teams by 100% in the period of 2002-2012 and has only a lot of regular season wins and one world championship to show for it. He has known for quite some time that he will be under a mandate to bring the payroll down to $189 million, and he has a lot of money committed at certain positions that will make fielding a competitive team difficult for any G.M., and he has not demonstrated that he can. He has not had a payroll of less than $189 million since 2005. Its been his team to manage for quite some time – he can not blame George Bush for this situation… I mean George Steinbrenner.

      The team is older. Cashman has locked up an average salary of $22.5 million at first base when he knew of the contractual obligations he would simultaneously have at third base for the duration of the contract – and the first baseman hit .251 last year. He is paying his No. 1 starter $23 million per year, and that starter has A LOT of innings in that left arm. He doesn’t have much to speak of in terms of a starting rotation after Sabathia, and he has not cultivated or procured talent in the minor leagues that can step in – the farm system is pretty much non-existent. There are A LOT of question marks in the bullpen. He does not have a right fielder. He is “hoping” to resign a .211 hitting catcher… He has been forced to pay a center fielder that hit .232 and struck out 195 times $15 million.

      This team is a MESS. And if he is not responsible for the mess, who is? The buck stops with him – he called it “‘his’ Big Hairy Monster Team.” AND BY THE WAY, THE 1998 YANKEES HAD THE SECOND-HIGHEST PAYROLL IN BASEBALL BEHIND BALTIMORE – ONLY $65 MILLION. That team won a combined 125 games! And a World Championship. And Cashman can not claim it – it was his first year there. And since then, the team has always had the highest payroll – by far, in M.L.B.

      If he at least had been able to acquire and maintain a solid 1-2-3 in the rotation, the team could compete in the playoffs – and that is what we are talking about – the playoffs – make no mistake about it, but he not been able to do that; Detroit has, San Francisco has; Philadelphia has; Tampa Bay has – and that’s why these teams are consistently positioned to win in October. And that is what he was supposed to have been doing with the $200 million he has been given to work with each year.

      Cashman has been given all of the resources a G.M. can ask for, and he has not even been able to put together a stable 1-2-3. He has tried to land Cliff Lee several times and has failed. I’ve noticed he’s very good at pursuing big names – Clemens, Mussina, Brown, Igawa, Pavano, Sabathia, Teixeira, Burnett, Lee, etc. But that is not how this franchise won from 1996 – 2001. Those teams were greater than the sum of their parts; professional and disciplined hitters, solid defense and starting pitching, and a great bullpen.

      Now we have Brian Cashman’s “All Or Nothing Big Hairy Monster Team.”

      He was fortunate Burnett, who is almost as unstable as Louise Neathway, was able to keep his act together in 2009, otherwise this team has not won since 2000.

      Cashman has a rotation of Sabathia, Nova, and Hughes for 2013, with Kuroda, Pettitte, and Garcia as question marks; not good enough. Hughes is the most inconsistent winning pitcher I have ever seen. Cashman has a bullpen of David Robertson and a lot of question marks for 2013; not good enough. And he has an offense that put up the worst numbers in postseason history last year; not good enough. And he’s got a 37 year old third baseman in decline and under contract until he is 42 or so – he knew that when he signed Teixeira and Sabathia. He can’t “afford” to write of contracts like Igawa, Pavano, and Burnett anymore.

      All this team has is a Rickey Henderson at second base, a 39 year-old shortstop pursuing one of the greatest records in sports, a very good, albeit expensive first baseman, and Sabathia. That’s pretty much it. The rest is not that spectacular. And as I’ve repeated there’s no help coming from the farm system and there’s no more money for Cashman to screw around with. No farm system, Cashman. No money for free agents, Cashman – you spent most of that money on free agents in 2009 – Sabathia and Teixeira. you spent it. You can’t blame anyone else. Now how is your “All Or Nothing Big Hairy Monster Team” going to take down Verlander, Scherzer, Fister, Cabrera, Fielder, Martinez, Hunter, Jackson, Young, etc. in the years to come? How about Baltimore? Texas? Not going to happen. Those organizations now have intelligent people making responsible financial and personnel decisions. And I don’t want to hear excuses about not being able to rebuild in New York, because you knew that too. You knew a “fiscal cliff” could come.

      Its his “All Or Nothing Big Hairy Mess of a Team.” And he also happens to be a s***bag on a personal level, as evidenced by the way he handled the Jeter negotiations, his off-the-field conduct, etc. But because he has a relationship with Levine and the Steinbrenners, Joe Girardi, not he, will be held responsible for the team’s continued failure to win in October – as stated by numerous journalists in the industry, and not just myself. @ Raf:

    66. LMJ229
      November 16th, 2012 | 11:22 pm

      Wow, between my travel, work and post-hurricane issues I’ve been too busy to post but I can see that you guys certainly have got this topic covered. Brian Cashman – my favorite topic. You know Raf, I really try to see your point: the team wins, is in the playoffs pretty much every year, so Cashman must be a good GM. I really try hard to understand your rationale and there is some merit to it. But the question remains: with all of the financial resources the Yankees pour into the team, is just making the playoffs good enough? Or should the expectations be higher? Should we expect championships when we consistently outspend the rest of baseball by a wide margin? Or should we be satisfied to just make the playoffs?

      Its all a matter of expectations. When I go to McDonalds I don’t expect to get a gourmet meal, but I don’t expect to pay alot either. If you believe that just making the playoffs is acceptable then Brian Cashman is doing a good job in your book. Clearly, McMillan believes that the Yankees should be winning more than 1 championship in a decade with all of the money they spend. He wants the bang for his buck. So in his opinion, Cashman is not doing a good job. I have to say, I comprehend McMillan’s rationale alot easier than yours.

    67. McMillan
      November 16th, 2012 | 11:51 pm

      “BTW, rarely does “think of the children” work. Kids believe in things like Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny and the Tooth Fairy. As adults, we know better. We have jobs, careers, bills to pay, mortgages, kids to manage, so on and so forth. Kids don’t. As adults we get to make choices that children do not, can not, should not, or will not. Don’t try to turn this around “on the children,” it has nothing to do with them.”

      Point taken. But if I had a subordinate who engaged in this type of conduct in such an industry, I would take the fact that children are “consumers” of our product seriously in taking into consideration this conduct… at least I think I would. As a kid, I was constantly reading about Al Rosen, Cedric Tallis, Gene Michael, Bill Bergesch, Murray Cook, Woody Woodward, Lou Piniella, etc. I don’t recall reading about nonsense like extramarital affairs, drug use, blackmailing, etc. when the names of these men were mentioned. This type of conduct costs people their reputations and careers.

      My biggest problem with Cashman is that I do not think he is a good baseball man. Period. Anyone can look at batting averages, home runs, runs-batted-in, earned run averages, and write checks on those bases. Its not hard to look at the statistics of a Roger Clemens or Mike Mussina or a Randy Johnson or a C.C. Sabathia or a Cliff Lee and decide to add them to a rotation if you have unlimited funds with which to sign them. He was given one of the best players of all time, Jeter, the best closer of all time, Rivera, one of the best left-handers of his time, Pettitte, a solid catcher, Posada, and excellent players such as O’Neill, Williams, and Martinez and he won with them for a while. Since 2002, however, what he has done with more resources than any other general manager in baseball has not been very impressive. In New York, you are supposed to win championships if you are the New York Yankees. That is what Brian Cashman was supposed to do with the $200 million payrolls he was allotted. It is only because he maintained both levels of competitiveness sufficient to get the team into the postseason and a certain relationship with senior management that he has been in the position so long. Not because he is one of the better G.M.s in baseball, which is what some people perceive him to be. A very strong argument can be made that he should have been replaced. And it will be interesting to see what happens in the next few years when the team does not make the playoffs because of the money it has tied up in long-term contracts and the financial constraints being imposed in the organization by ownership. The Yankees have not seen consecutive years of non-contention for quite some time, so as I said it will be interesting to see what happens.@ Raf:

    68. LMJ229
      November 17th, 2012 | 12:11 am

      McMillan wrote:

      The Yankees have not seen consecutive years of non-contention for quite some time, so as I said it will be interesting to see what happens.

      And it will definitely happen, quite possibly starting with this year. With more than half of our 25-man roster over the age of 30, and a good percentage of that over the age of 35, this team is eventually going to crash and burn. You can only go to the well so many times. With no reinforcements in place at the lower levels and the self-imposed salary cap for 2014, Cashman is left hoping that guys like Rivera, Petitte, and Kuroda don’t retire and guys like Jeter, A-Rod, Ichiro and Ibanez can perform at a high level despite being on the wrong side of 35. That’s how Cashman builds a roster – on the hopes that he can squeeze one more year out of guys who are beyond their prime. It’s going to all come crashing down one day. And when it does it will take a long time to repair. Maybe then the owners will finally wake up and fire the guy. But we will likely be suffering through years of ineptitude.

    69. Raf
      November 17th, 2012 | 1:32 am

      McMillan wrote:

      Major League Baseball Payroll Information, 2002 – 2012
      N.Y. Yankees had highest payroll in M.L.B. each year by tens-of-millions of dollars.

      Now break it down even further. How many of those teams have made the playoffs from 2002-2012? And if they didn’t make the playoffs, how can they become a championship team?

      McMillan wrote:

      Yankees are now in the position of trying to replace a .211 catcher…

      You do know that the M’s are trying to move Montero from behind the plate, right?

      McMillan wrote:

      If he at least had been able to acquire and maintain a solid 1-2-3 in the rotation

      Sabathia, Kuroda and Pettitte don’t count?

      Yanks finished 4th behind TB, OAK & SEA, in R/G and 5th in ERA (same teams with DET added). 3rd in K’s…

      Pitching wasn’t the problem. The 2002 Yankees had Clemens, Mussina, Pettitte, Duque & Wells and were bounced from the 1st round.

      McMillan wrote:

      I’ve noticed he’s very good at pursuing big names – Clemens, Mussina, Brown, Igawa, Pavano, Sabathia, Teixeira, Burnett, Lee, etc. But that is not how this franchise won from 1996 – 2001

      David Cone was a big name. Darryl Strawberry was a big name. Wade Boggs was a big name. Cecil Fielder was a big name. Tim Raines was a big name. Jack McDowell was a big name. Dwight Gooden was a big name. Roger Clemens was a big name. Chuck Knoblauch was a big name.

      McMillan wrote:

      As a kid, I was constantly reading about Al Rosen, Cedric Tallis, Gene Michael, Bill Bergesch, Murray Cook, Woody Woodward, Lou Piniella, etc. I don’t recall reading about nonsense like extramarital affairs, drug use, blackmailing, etc. when the names of these men were mentioned.

      The media then wasn’t what it is now; you certainly weren’t able to pull links from deadspin and nesn back then.

    70. Raf
      November 17th, 2012 | 1:44 am

      LMJ229 wrote:

      I really try hard to understand your rationale and there is some merit to it. But the question remains: with all of the financial resources the Yankees pour into the team, is just making the playoffs good enough? Or should the expectations be higher? Should we expect championships when we consistently outspend the rest of baseball by a wide margin? Or should we be satisfied to just make the playoffs?

      Again, playoffs are a crapshoot, anything can happen in a short series. Payroll has nothing to do with it. There are points during the season where the Yanks have gone 3-2 over the span of 5 games. Having a high payroll doesn’t make them immune to that, nor does it give a team a magical ability to raise their game, or whatever.

      You may expect championships, but the game doesn’t work that way. The best team in baseball doesn’t always win.

    71. Raf
      November 17th, 2012 | 1:49 am

      Raf wrote:

      McMillan wrote:

      Yankees are now in the position of trying to replace a .211 catcher…

      You do know that the M’s are trying to move Montero from behind the plate, right?

      To expand on this point, for the M’s, Miguel Olivo was the primary catcher, Montero the backup. Montero started more games at DH than he did at catcher.

    72. Raf
      November 17th, 2012 | 2:00 am

      LMJ229 wrote:

      And it will definitely happen, quite possibly starting with this year. With more than half of our 25-man roster over the age of 30, and a good percentage of that over the age of 35, this team is eventually going to crash and burn. You can only go to the well so many times.

      The last time the Yankees had a team of hitters under the average age of 30? 1993. Pitching? 2009.

      Yankees crash and burn? I’ll believe it when I see it.

      Regulars over 35? Jeter, Rodriguez & Ibañez. You can count Ichiro too, if you’d like. And the only reason Ibañez (40) saw so much time was the injury to Gardner (28).

    73. Raf
      November 17th, 2012 | 2:02 am
    74. Evan3457
      November 17th, 2012 | 2:13 am

      Raf wrote:

      Might as well…
      http://waswatching.com/2012/08/01/are-the-fans-unfair-with-cashman/#comments

      Thanks. I was going to post to this thread, but instead, with you having covered all the relevant counterarguments, I’ll repost the link that I posted in that thread:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uS2nWLz-AbE

    75. BOHAN
      November 17th, 2012 | 5:06 am

      Raf wrote:

      Yankees crash and burn? I’ll believe it when I see it.

      Same here

    76. LMJ229
      November 18th, 2012 | 1:34 am

      BOHAN wrote:

      Raf wrote:

      Yankees crash and burn? I’ll believe it when I see it.

      Same here

      Did you live through the late 60′s-early 70′s and the mid 80′s-early 90′s? Believe it or not, it happens.

    77. Raf
      November 18th, 2012 | 2:12 am

      LMJ229 wrote:

      Did you live through the late 60′s-early 70′s and the mid 80′s-early 90′s? Believe it or not, it happens

      Yes, it happens, and their demise has been predicted every year since 2005. Here we are in 2012 and the Yanks are still going strong. I guess if the wheels fall off, the blind squirrel will find a nut and then they can say “I told you so.”

      This time around, the Yanks aren’t reluctant to sign black players, as they were in the 60′s. This time around, there aren’t MLB owners colluding against free agents as was the case in the 80′s.

      I’ll believe it when I see it.

    78. McMillan
      November 18th, 2012 | 2:45 pm

      “How Cashman is not under fire is a mystery to me. If you look at his drafts and player development which have been, at best, poor; his pitching acquisitions and missteps; his failure to put together a quality bench; and his off-field embarrassments that permeated the organization, why is he never examined in an objective way to determine whether his negatives outweigh whatever positives he provides?”

      http://paullebowitz.com/blog/?p=6388

      @ LMJ229:

    79. McMillan
      November 18th, 2012 | 2:48 pm

      “The Yankees were able to get the best free agents and acquire players via trade because of several reasons that no longer apply. The Yankees have outspent the rest of baseball by a wide margin over the past decade and have one World Series title to show for it. In fact, they’ve only been in the World Series twice in the past decade. Players aren’t signing with the Yankees to go to the World Series anymore; they’re signing for a chance to go to the World Series and this now is an evident possibility in about 10-12 locations every year. ”

      http://paullebowitz.com/blog/?p=6388

      I only include the statements from this link to show that mine is not the only voice here when it comes to “off-field embarrassments” and prognostications for the future…

      @ BOHAN:

    80. McMillan
      November 18th, 2012 | 3:02 pm

      You’ve already seen it. You’ve already seen it!

      Did you watch this team in the 1980s? In the 1980s, the New York Yankees won more games than any other team. In the 1980s, the New York Yankees spent more money on its payroll than any other team. In the 1980s, the New York Yankees failed miserably in developing or acquiring quality starting pitching. And in the 1980s, the New York Yankees failed to win a world championship (for the first time since the acquisition of… Babe Ruth!).

      Sound familiar? Does this sound familiar?

      In the period 2002 – 2012 (11 years and counting), the New York Yankees have won more games than any other team. In the period 2002 – 2012 (11 years and counting), the New York Yankees have spent more money on its payroll than any other team. In the period 2002 – 2012 (11 years and counting) the New York Yankees have failed in developing or acquiring starting pitching. And in the period 2002 – 2012 (11 years and counting), the New York Yankees failed to win more than one world championship, and that world championship only came with a $161 million contract for a starting pitcher, a $180 million contract for a first baseman, and an $82.5 million contract for a second starting pitcher.

      And I do NOT know of a SINGLE Yankee fan that looks back fondly on the 1980s, or considers that decade a success. And who has been the G.M. for the New York Yankees for the period 2002 – 2012?

      @ Raf:

    81. McMillan
      November 18th, 2012 | 3:24 pm

      “Yes, it happens, and their demise has been predicted every year since 2005. Here we are in 2012 and the Yanks are still going strong. I guess if the wheels fall off, the blind squirrel will find a nut and then they can say ‘I told you so.’”

      Going strong? The worst offensive exhibition in the history of postseason baseball in 2012? A projected starting rotation of C.C. Sabathia, Ivan Nova, Phil Hughes, Freddy Garcia, and David Phelps for 2013?

      Going strong? Contractual commitments approaching $26 million-per-year or so to a 38-year-old third baseman in substantial decline until he is 42 years of age, and contractual commitments approaching $22.5 million-per year to a first baseman that hit .251 last year?

      Going strong? A center fielder that hits .232 and strikes out 195 times and earns $15 million? A 39 year-old shortstop? A 43 year old closer coming off almost a full season on the disabled list?

      Before you can say that a team is going strong, don’t you have to know who the catcher is or will be? Who the right fielder is or will be? Who the No. 2 starter is or will be? Who the No. 3 starter is or will be? Who will be in the bullpen?

      @ Raf:

    82. McMillan
      November 18th, 2012 | 4:13 pm

      Here we go again: “I guess if the wheels fall off, the blind squirrel will find a nut and then they can say ‘I told you so.’”

      How about: “Even a broken clock is right twice-per-day?”

      Can someone please tell me of a prudent trade or transaction Brian Cashman has engaged in in which his organization has come away as the clear winner? Most reasonable people would agree the Detroit Tigers were the clear winners in acquiring Austin Jackson and Max Scherzer by giving up Curtis Granderson.

      But I would like to know of an example of Mary Cashman’s lesser half getting the better of another organization? The acquisition of Corey Lidle and Bobby Abreu was a good trade. Nick Swisher was a good trade – BUT the guy does NOT HIT in OCTOBER.

      “We” do not want players that do not play well in New York, because that is where “we” play 81 games in each season (e.g. Eddie Lee Whitson, Javier Vazquez, A.J. Burnett, etc.). Likewise, “we” do not want players that do not play well in October, because that’s when the playoffs are played (Alex Rodriguez, Nick Swisher, Mark Teixeira, Curtis Granderson, etc.).

      Anything else? In all of these years? Anything else besides the aforementioned trades with Philadelphia and Chicago? Hector Made for Sal Fasano?

      In Cashman’s own words, he had not had the control he wanted until 2005. Wasn’t Kei Igawa signed around that time. Carl Pavano?

      @ Raf:

    83. McMillan
      November 18th, 2012 | 4:23 pm

      “If he had at least been able to acquire and maintain a solid 1-2-3 in the rotation…”

      “Sabathia, Kurdoda, and Pettitte don’t count?”

      I wrote “maintain.” “Maintain.” Kuroda was signed to a one-year contract. And Pettitte has been contemplating retirement. “Maintain.”

      @ Raf:

    84. McMillan
      November 18th, 2012 | 4:48 pm

      David Cone was a big name acquired in a trade. Darryl Strawberry was a big name in name only. He was not the Darryl Strawberry of the mid 1980s, and that is not the role he played on the team from 1996 – 2001. These are mostly trades you’re referring to.

      Again: the 1996 – 2001 teams were built around the products of their farm systems and trades. They were built around names like O’Neill (trade), Williams (farm system), Jeter (farm system), Posada (farm system), Martinez (trade for prospects), Rivera (farm system), Pettitte (farm system) and Cone (trade). Yes, they made some trades for aging stars that contributed for a year or two (Strawberry, Fielder, etc.) – BUT the team was NOT build around these latter players.

      What trades has Cashman made since 2005 having ridden Jeter, Rivera, Posada, and Pettitte for all of those years? What players have come from the farm? Cano? He tried to move Cano for years.

      He complained about not having the control he wanted until 2005. So what has he done? He has tried to keep this team competitive by writing checks to Roger Clemens, Mike Mussina, Kevin Brown, Alex Rodriguez, Randy Johnson, Kei Igawa, Carl Pavano, C.C. Sabathia, Mark Teixeira, A.J. Burnett, etc., while paying none other than Jeter and Rivera into their 40s and begging Pettitte to save his *** and come out of retirement every year.

      And yes, I am aware of questions about Montero’s defense – but the point is that Cashman – so far – has again failed at getting fair value in a trade. Pineda might show up to spring training not 30 pounds overweight, he might show up in spring training with a fastball above 93 m.p.h., he might show up to spring training without getting arrested for D.U.I. on the way, and he might develop into a legitimate no. 1 or no. 2 starter – I am PREDICTING this in large part does not happen.

      @ Raf:

    85. McMillan
      November 18th, 2012 | 4:56 pm

      We’ll never know, but I’m willing to bet that kid Montero could have sat in for Martin in the postseason last year and delivered some offense the team so desperately needed. He’s that kind of kid, and a valuable commodity in that he can hit in the middle of the lineup and if not catch – if it turns out that he does not develop into a full-time catcher – occupy the role of a backup catcher. Instead, Cashman failed to get at least fair value for such a commodity – Pineda struggled in the second half of his rookie year, and showed up at spring training 30 pounds overweight and his velocity in the low 90s. He then needed should surgery and apparently spent a portion of the season driving around the State of Florida under the influence of alcohol while Montero continued his development and Cashman was admiring his “All-Or-Nothing Big Hairy Monster Team” that can’t hit in October.

    86. McMillan
      November 18th, 2012 | 8:13 pm

      The Top Ten Trades of the Steinbrenner Era – And not 1 of them made by Brian Cashman…

      http://bleacherreport.com/articles/377457-top-10-new-york-yankees-trades-in-the-george-steinbrenner-era/page/1

      If Brian Cashman is such a great G.M., why is there not one trade to his credit on this list? Remember, he has “maintained” that he was against the Rodriguez trade.

      Tino Martinez, Jeff Nelson, and Jim Mecir for Sterling Hitchcock and Russell Davis (1995). When has Cashman pulled off such a trade? And does he have a ring for 1998, 1999, or 2000 without this trade? Almost certainly not.

      David Cone for Marty Janzen, Jason Jarvis, and Mike Gordon (1995). When has Cashman pulled off such a trade? And does he have a ring for 1998, 1999, and 2000 without this trade? Again, almost certainly not.

      So what are his best trades in 15 years? None of them made this list, while there appear to be a lot from the 1970s and 1990s. Isn’t that consistent with previous posts – no world championships in the 1980s, for example. Or is this web page just another example of “drivel.” If its “drivel,” then what are the trades that Cashman has made that belong on the list?

      Roger Clemens? I don’t think so… Cashman gave up an 18-4 left hander and two pretty good players for Clemens and his trainer Brian McNamee and McNamee’s syringes. And besides, I thought Cashman did not get the control he wanted until 2005…

      So the best Cashman has done on the trade front – in 15 years – has been the Abreu deal and the Swisher deal. And where does Swisher rank on the list (http://www.rlyw.net/index.php/RLYW/comments/the_50_worst_postseason_hitters_in_mlb_since_2002) of the worst postseason hitters since 2002? Number 4.

      What we have with Louise Neathway’s paramour is someone who inherited a team with a “core” of Jeter, Posada, Rivera, and Pettitte, and a supporting cast of players acquired in trades the greatness of which have never been matched by Cashman – O’Neill, Martinez, Brosius, and Cone, and acquired in prudent free agent signings – Key – a team that also included Bernie Williams and others and that did not have the highest payroll in M.L.B. in 1998, and someone who received more recognition for the accomplishments of this team from 1998 – 2001 as general manager than he rightfully deserved.

      And from 2002 – 2009, he kept this “core” competitive by writing checks to people like Mike Mussina, Kevin Brown, Randy Johnson, Roger Clemens, Kei Igawa, Carl Pavano, C.C. Sabathia, A.J. Burnett, Gary Sheffield, Mark Teixeira, etc.

      Unlike the 1996 – 2001 teams, built through the farm system and the trades mentioned above – teams (plural) that won four world championhips (plural) , the 1998 team (singular) was built on the 1996 – 2001 teams’ “core” – an aged Jeter, Rivera, Posada, and Pettitte, and hundreds of millions of dollars of contractual obligations to free agents and won one world championship (singular).

      So how did Cashman get the team to the postseason so often? If was not through the development of talent in the farm system and it was not through a substantial record of acquiring talent through trades and it was not through prudent free agent signings – it was through a group of core players the development or acquisition of which he was not responsible for, an expanded playoff format, and the authorization to carry the highest payroll in baseball by ten-of-millions of dollars and write off some of the worst contracts in the history of professional sports (i.e. Igawa, Pavano, and Burnett).

      When things go right, its “[his] All-Or-Nothing Big Hairy Monster Team.” When things go wrong, its “I was against the Alex Rodriguez contract” – until Alex Rodgriguez delivers in the postseason in 2009and provides Cashman with the team’s first world championship in ten years… When things go right, its “[his] All-Or-Nothing Big Hairy Monster Team.” When things go wrong, its “I was against the Rafael Soriano contract – until Rafael Soriano delivers in place of an injured Mariano Rivera in the regular season in 2012 and gets Cashman’s “All-Or-Nothing Big Hairy Monster Team” into the playoff by the skin of its teeth.

      @ Evan3457:

    87. McMillan
      November 18th, 2012 | 8:17 pm

      Correction: the 2009 team (singular) was built on the 1996 – 2001 teams’ core…

    88. McMillan
      November 18th, 2012 | 8:37 pm

      “This time around, there aren’t MLB owners colluding against free agents as was the case in the 80′s.”

      Its about the only thing you’ve said that I agree with. Were it not for collusion, the Yankees sign Jack Morris when he knocked on George Steinbrenner’s office door and asked to play for the team in the 1980s as the best right-handed starting pitcher in the American League and a future Hall-of-Famer.

      But the fact that collusion does not exist is not going to save a general manager that has been allocated a $189 million payroll with the contractual obligations he has burdened the team with and a general manager that has not negotiated a trade better than a deal for Bobby Abreu in the last fifteen years and a general manager that has absolutely no farm system to speak of and a general manager that does not know whom his catcher or his right fielder or his No. 2 or his No. 3 starter or his long reliever(s) is going to be… Or a general manager that must decide what to do with the most talented player in baseball but one that gives only 80%…
      @ Raf:

    89. McMillan
      November 18th, 2012 | 9:03 pm

      “Again, playoffs are a crapshoot, anything can happen in a short series. Payroll has nothing to do with it. There are points during the season where the Yanks have gone 3-2 over the span of 5 games. Having a high payroll doesn’t make them immune to that, nor does it give a team a magical ability to raise their game, or whatever.
      You may expect championships, but the game doesn’t work that way. The best team in baseball doesn’t always win.”

      The playoffs are a crapshoot – but you don’t have a chance without a solid 1-2-3 at the top of the rotation. Unless you’re throwing the 1988 version of Orel Hershiser. Anything can happen in one short series. But you can not win three consecutive short series in a post season without a solid 1-2-3 at the top of the rotation; you can not expect to win with Sabathia, Kuroda, and a guy in his forties that has retired six or seven times – even if his name is Andy Pettitte. This is the main reason why the team has not won more than once in the last eleven years (and why it did not win in the 1980s), and will not win for the foreseeable future. It is not the fault of Alex Rodriguez. It is not the fault of Joe Girardi. It is the fault of General Manager.

      @ Raf:

    90. McMillan
      November 18th, 2012 | 9:08 pm

      “This time around, the Yanks aren’t reluctant to sign black players, as they were in the 60′s.”

      What in God’s name this has to do with Brian Cashman’s record as G.M. is beyond me…

      @ Raf:

    91. Raf
      November 19th, 2012 | 12:18 am

      McMillan wrote:

      “How Cashman is not under fire is a mystery to me. If you look at his drafts and player development which have been, at best, poor; his pitching acquisitions and missteps; his failure to put together a quality bench; and his off-field embarrassments that permeated the organization, why is he never examined in an objective way to determine whether his negatives outweigh whatever positives he provides?”
      http://paullebowitz.com/blog/?p=6388
      @ LMJ229:

      It’s simple, if he were examined in an objective way, this thread would not have reached 90+ posts, nor would Steve have a drum to beat :D

      Meanwhile, Yankees drafts since 1965. Have at it, you’ll see that Cashman isn’t much better than his predecessors when it comes to the draft. It could be because of the org’s emphasis on high schoolers, I don’t know.
      http://www.baseball-reference.com/draft/?query_type=franch_round&draft_type=junreg&team_ID=NYY&draft_round=1&

      McMillan wrote:

      Did you watch this team in the 1980s? In the 1980s, the New York Yankees won more games than any other team. In the 1980s, the New York Yankees spent more money on its payroll than any other team. In the 1980s, the New York Yankees failed miserably in developing or acquiring quality starting pitching. And in the 1980s, the New York Yankees failed to win a world championship (for the first time since the acquisition of… Babe Ruth!).
      Sound familiar? Does this sound familiar?

      *sigh*

      The Yankees made the playoffs in 1980 & 81. Can you tell me how a team can win a world championship when it can’t qualify for the playoffs?

      Who were the GM’s during the 80′s?

      McMillan wrote:

      Going strong? The worst offensive exhibition in the history of postseason baseball in 2012?

      162 > 9. Always.

      McMillan wrote:

      New York Yankees failed to win more than one world championship, and that world championship only came with a $161 million contract for a starting pitcher, a $180 million contract for a first baseman, and an $82.5 million contract for a second starting pitcher.

      Players that were there in 2010 & 2011 and 2012. So what happened?

      McMillan wrote:

      And I do NOT know of a SINGLE Yankee fan that looks back fondly on the 1980s, or considers that decade a success. And who has been the G.M. for the New York Yankees for the period 2002 – 2012?

      I recommend you get out and meet more people.

      McMillan wrote:

      I wrote “maintain.” “Maintain.” Kuroda was signed to a one-year contract. And Pettitte has been contemplating retirement. “Maintain.”

      So? Swap out names for other pitchers, Clemens, Wang, Pettitte, Mussina, Duque, Johnson, etc, etc, etc. You’re being obtuse.

      McMillan wrote:

      Again: the 1996 – 2001 teams were built around the products of their farm systems and trades. They were built around names like O’Neill (trade), Williams (farm system), Jeter (farm system), Posada (farm system), Martinez (trade for prospects), Rivera (farm system), Pettitte (farm system) and Cone (trade). Yes, they made some trades for aging stars that contributed for a year or two (Strawberry, Fielder, etc.) – BUT the team was NOT build around these latter players.

      Boggs, FA. Key, FA. Duncan, FA. Cone, retained as FA. Rogers, FA. Dion James, FA. Gooden, FA. Fernandez, FA.

      McMillan wrote:

      And yes, I am aware of questions about Montero’s defense – but the point is that Cashman – so far – has again failed at getting fair value in a trade.

      You may want to look up the value of DH’s and backup catchers, then.

      McMillan wrote:

      Pineda struggled in the second half of his rookie year,

      Take a look at his peripherals.

      McMillan wrote:

      We’ll never know, but I’m willing to bet that kid Montero could have sat in for Martin in the postseason last year and delivered some offense the team so desperately needed.

      Posada was done midway through 2011. Why didn’t Montero get the call then?

      McMillan wrote:

      a general manager that does not know whom his catcher or his right fielder or his No. 2 or his No. 3 starter or his long reliever(s) is going to be…

      Dude, it’s November. There is plenty of time to get things sorted.

      You keep repeating the same things over and over again, as if it makes them true. It doesn’t.

      McMillan wrote:

      he playoffs are a crapshoot – but you don’t have a chance without a solid 1-2-3 at the top of the rotation.

      Meanwhile, in Atlanta, with a solid 1-2-3 in Maddux, Smoltz & Glavine…

      Define solid 1-2-3? Seattle had a solid 1-2-3 and they didn’t make the playoffs. The Rays had a solid 1-2-3, and didn’t escape the first round. There is no one way to build a World Championship team. Teams of all types have won it all.

      McMillan wrote:

      “This time around, the Yanks aren’t reluctant to sign black players, as they were in the 60′s.”
      What in God’s name this has to do with Brian Cashman’s record as G.M. is beyond me…
      @ Raf:

      It has nothing to do with his record and everything to do with why the Yankees weren’t competitive during the 60′s. Part of a separate conversation with LMJ229.

    92. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 2:24 pm

      You’re very good at parsing statements and responding to them out-of-context. But you did not name a trade by Cashman on par with any of the best trades made by the team’s G.M.s in the 1973 – 1980 and 1992 – 1999 periods…

      Name one trade Brian Cashman has made on par with the Martinez deal, or the Cone deal, or all of the trades that built the great 1970s teams (Chambliss, Randolph, Piniella, Nettles, Randolph, Rivers, Figueroa, etc.), for example. Name 1 trade in his 15 years… Its a simple question. Name 1 trade in 15 years?@ Raf:

    93. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 3:49 pm

      So the Oakland A’s won three straight “crap shoots” in the 1970s? The New York Yankees won three straight “crap shoots” in 1998 – 2000?

      For $200 million-per-year, an M.L.B. G.M. should be able to put together a team capable of winning a world championship each year – not guaranteed to, but capable of. As far a starting pitching is concerned, the best Cashman has been able to do is: 1. ride what he inherited from 1998 – 2002; 2. throw a lot of money around a center of Pettitte and Mussina for approx. five years (Clemens, Brown, Johnson, Igawa, Pavano, etc.); and throw a lot of money at Sabathia and Burnett in 2009.

      Cashman has spent approx. $200 million-per-year since 2008, and the team was only capable of competing for and winning a world championship in one of those years – it did not have the offense or starting rotation to compete for one in the other four years – this is where your characterization of the playoffs as a “crap shoot” fails.

      The team did not fail to win a world championship in 2008, 2010, 2011, and 2012 despite having these huge payrolls because it lost a “crap shoot,” it failed because the teams it competed against – teams with much smaller payrolls – were teams better built to win in October by better general managers.

      You don’t just build a team to win as many games as possible because the playoffs are a “crap shoot,” and anything can happen once there; you build a team that is both capable of getting to the playoffs, and once there, capable of winning in the playoffs.

      How do you build such a team? You acquire [or God forbid develop] personnel that hit from April to October, not just from April to September. And you acquire [or God forbid develop] starting pitching capable of competing against the likes of Verlander, Scherzer, and Fister, or Halliday, Lee, and Hamels, for example. You also need defense, a bullpen, and a bench. These elements are not going to guarantee a world championship or even a World Series appearance every year, but will guarantee you an opportunity to compete for one once there.

      And given the highest payroll in baseball by far each year, you should be able to have these elements mostly in place each year. Cashman has not. That we are pointing this out does not make us “Cashman Bashers.” One is not a “Cashman Basher” for pointing out that the best trade he has managed to pull off in all of 15 years was the one for Nick Swisher – a guy that does not hit in October; it is a fact.

      @ Raf:

    94. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 3:55 pm

      “The Yankees made the playoffs in 1980 & 81. Can you tell me how a team can win a world championship when it can’t qualify for the playoffs?”

      See my previous post. Remember what Earl Weaver said? “If you play for one run, that is all that you are going to get.” If you play to win the most games in the regular season, that is all that you are going to win.
      @ Raf:

    95. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 3:56 pm

      “The Yankees made the playoffs in… Can you tell me how a team can win a world championship when it can’t qualify for the playoffs?”

      See my previous post. Remember what Earl Weaver said? “If you play for one run, that is all that you are going to get.” If you play to win the most games in the regular season, that is all that you are going to win.
      @ Raf:

    96. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 4:03 pm

      “Define solid 1-2-3? Seattle had a solid 1-2-3 and they didn’t make the playoffs. The Rays had a solid 1-2-3, and didn’t escape the first round. There is no one way to build a World Championship team. Teams of all types have won it all.”

      See my previous post. The point is that the Rays put themselves in a position to win it all with a solid 1-2-3. They still needed a lineup that could score runs in October-November. There IS a way to build a World Championship team: it must have solid starting pitching, defense, and a lineup capable of scoring runs off premier starting pitchers at their best (in October). Without these three things, you can not win it all. A good bench and bullpen do not hurt either.

      All teams that have won have these three things in common. And $200 million is enough money to put such a team together.

      @ Raf:

    97. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 4:09 pm

      “Posada was done midway through 2011. Why didn’t Montero get the call then?”

      Posada was done in 2010; and Montero was 20 years old at the time – he wasn’t even old enough to drink legally and get into a car and drive around Florida in a state of intoxication as Michael Pineda has been doing while recovering from shoulder surgery.

      @ McMillan:

    98. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 4:34 pm

      “You keep repeating the same things over and over again, as if it makes them true. It doesn’t.”

      Which statement(s) is untrue: the team has substantial budgetary constraints, weaknesses at a number of positions including catcher, right field, and the starting rotation, unanswered questions in the bullpen, few if any minor league prospects to address these circumstances, and a G.M. who boasts the Nick Swisher trade as his best deal in the last 15 years?
      @ Raf:

    99. MJ Recanati
      November 19th, 2012 | 4:53 pm

      All I’ve got to say about the comments in this thread is…jeez. SMH.

    100. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 5:21 pm

      “So? Swap out names for other pitchers, Clemens, Wang, Pettitte, Mussina, Duque, Johnson, etc, etc, etc. You’re being obtuse.”

      I’ll certainly give him credit for maintaining Pettitte, Mussina, and Wang for a period of time… but since 2002, he has had the luxury of an availability of financial resources that allowed him to remain competitive with the signings of expensive pitchers well-past their primes, and he has been able to write off such mistakes as two of the worst contracts in history. Further, he has had $200 million payrolls since 2008, and the rotation is in complete disarray.

      You build a team around a stable rotation if you’re given a mandate to win each year and the payroll to accomplish it. Detroit was able to pull off a trade for Fister at the trade deadline last year – a trade better than ANY that Cashman has executed in 15 years, at a time Cashman needed an arm. As a result, Detroit will be positioned to compete in October on that basis for years to come. It will not be a question of “[w]ho is our No. 3 starter?” every year in Detroit, as it seems to be every year in the Bronx under Cashman.

      @ Raf:

    101. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 5:29 pm

      “Meanwhile, Yankees drafts since 1965. Have at it, you’ll see that Cashman isn’t much better than his predecessors when it comes to the draft.”

      For some reason, this organization has not done well drafting or developing young starting pitching going back to the 1960s… I have no explanation for it – they’re the New York Yankees. Just to continue with the Cashman bashing, however: what has he done to address that?

      @ Raf:

    102. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 5:33 pm

      “You may want to look up the value of DH’s and backup catchers, then.”

      The value of a young kid that hits as well as Montero and that can be a backup or emergency catcher is pretty HIGH.
      @ Raf:

    103. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 5:47 pm

      “Players that were there in 2010 & 2011 and 2012. So what happened?”

      This question is an example of why I have had to repeat myself: what happened was that Cashman’s “All-Or-Nothing Big Hairy Monster Team” was composed of aging players that do not hit in October. And all of the New York tabloids blamed Alex Rodriguez for the fact that Nick Swisher, Curtis Granderson, Russell Martin, and Mark Teixeira did not hit along with Rodriguez – instead of Brian Cashman for having put this team together.

      What happened in 2009 was that Rodriguez miraculously hit in October; if he doesn’t, they don’t win in 2009 either.

      @ Raf:

    104. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 6:00 pm

      “Boggs, FA. Key, FA. Duncan, FA. Cone, retained as FA. Rogers, FA. Dion James, FA. Gooden, FA. Fernandez, FA.”

      Boggs was not part of the 1998 – 2000 teams; Brosius was acquired in a trade for Kenny Rogers. Cone was also acquired in a trade. Duncan was not part of the 1998 – 2000 teams. Fernandez was not part of the team after 1995. Gooden was a No. 4 starter. Dion James was hardly a centerpiece.

      @ Raf:

    105. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 6:07 pm

      “Take a look at his peripherals.”

      Do you mean Pineda’s waistline?

      @ Raf:

    106. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 6:23 pm

      “162 > 9. Always.”

      I assume this means that the regular season is more important than the post season, although I don’t know where the ’9′ comes from.

      Suppose Brian Cashman writes $250 million worth of checks in 2013 and spends the additional $50 million on offense and wins more regular season games as a result, and his team sets records in every offensive category; however the team is still eliminated in the first round of the playoffs. Is he to be regarded as a better G.M. because he won more regular season games? Should his million-dollar salary be increased?

      @ Raf:

    107. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 6:29 pm

      The question of the day is “[W]hat has Brian Cashman’s most successful trade been in his 15-year tenure as General Manager of the New York Yankees? I can’t get an answer from Raf, and I don’t believe the Nick Swisher trade speaks to an impressive record if that’s the best Cashman has done in 15 years…

      @ MJ Recanati:

    108. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 6:50 pm

      “It’s simple, if he were examined in an objective way, this thread would not have reached 90+ posts”

      Raf’s right. What could be more objective than the payroll figures provided for the last ten years, and the number of championships won in that timeframe compared to other franchises and their respective payrolls? Or the cost of each victory?

      In 2012, Brian Cashman paid $2,083,813.56 for each regular season win; the American League Champion Detroit Tigers paid $1,503,409.09 for each regular season win; the World Champion San Francisco Giants paid $1,251,283.86 for each regular season win.

      According to Raf, ALTHOUGH the San Francisco Giants paid $832,529.70 LESS for each regular season win than the New York Yankees AND WON a WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP, Brian Cashman is a better G.M. than the Giants’ Brian Sabean because the Yankees won 95 regular season games and the Giants won only 94.

      @ Raf:

    109. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 7:16 pm

      *Notes that McMillan conveniently ignores that Granderson hit 40+ HR, and was nowhere to be found when AJax posted a .249/.317/.374 line a year ago… Next!”

      I ignored the 40+ HR because what matters to me is October… And Ajax certainly outperformed Granderson in the postseason in 2012, didn’t he? And to paraphrase yourself, you can not get to the World Series without winning a League Championship Series. And you can’t get the a League Championship Series without winning in the regular season.

      And what did Ajax hit in the regular season? .300? What did Granderson hit? .232? How many times did Granderson strike out in the regular season? 195? What is the 11th-highest strikeout total in MLB history? 195? Who traded Ajax for Granderson? Cashman? …Next!

      @ Raf:

    110. Raf
      November 19th, 2012 | 7:42 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      All I’ve got to say about the comments in this thread is…jeez. SMH.

      Looks like McMillan’s trying to make up for lost time…

    111. Raf
      November 19th, 2012 | 7:58 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      You’re very good at parsing statements and responding to them out-of-context.

      You’re shotgunning, and I have neither the time nor wherewithal to respond to every single line you post, especially when you repeat things over and over again. So, I take bits and pieces wherever I can.

      McMillan wrote:

      Name one trade Brian Cashman has made on par with the Martinez deal, or the Cone deal, or all of the trades that built the great 1970s teams (Chambliss, Randolph, Piniella, Nettles, Randolph, Rivers, Figueroa, etc.), for example. Name 1 trade in his 15 years… Its a simple question. Name 1 trade in 15 years?@ Raf:

      Justice, Abreu, Swisher, Clemens, Knoblauch, to name a few. Let’s see how you spin these. Should be entertaining watching you make yourself dizzy :)

      McMillan wrote:

      Posada was done in 2010; and Montero was 20 years old at the time – he wasn’t even old enough to drink legally and get into a car and drive around Florida in a state of intoxication as Michael Pineda has been doing while recovering from shoulder surgery.

      In other words, you’ve got noting. BTW, 2010 isn’t 2011 ;)

      McMillan wrote:

      The value of a young kid that hits as well as Montero and that can be a backup or emergency catcher is pretty HIGH.

      You may want to take a look at the line Montero posted last year. If he’s a backup or emergency catcher, then he isn’t worth that much. If he is a DH, he isn’t worth that much, as evidenced by the price of DH’s around the league.

      McMillan wrote:

      What could be more objective than the payroll figures provided for the last ten years, and the number of championships won in that timeframe compared to other franchises and their respective payrolls? Or the cost of each victory?

      Easy, looking at the payroll figures the last 10 years as well as how each of those teams have performed during the regular season and the postseason. Take a look at the roster construction while you’re at it.

      McMillan wrote:

      According to Raf, ALTHOUGH the San Francisco Giants paid $832,529.70 LESS for each regular season win than the New York Yankees AND WON a WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP, Brian Cashman is a better G.M. than the Giants’ Brian Sabean because the Yankees won 95 regular season games and the Giants won only 94.

      And, more importantly, the Giants missed the playoffs in 2011, 2004-09, 2001, 1998-99.

    112. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 8:49 pm

      “Justice, Abreu, Swisher, Clemens, Knoblauch, to name a few. Let’s see how you spin these. Should be entertaining watching you make yourself dizzy”

      Thank you.

      Justice and Abreu were certainly good trades; and so was Swisher. But Swisher was the best, in my opinion. However, by no stretch of the imagination was this trade comparable to either the Tino Martinez deal or the David Cone deal, or the deals that built the great teams of the 1970s – not even close, in terms of both its significance and impact, and as a reflection of the qualifications and skills of the G.M. associated with the transaction.

      Clemens was acquired in exchange for a pitcher that went 18-4 and threw a perfect game, and pitched for a team that won 125 total games in addition to two other very good players. Knoblauch was acquired in exchange for Eric Milton, Cristian Guzman, and other prospects… Was the Knoblauch trade better than the Randolph trade?

      None of the trades you mentioned were better than the best trades that built the great New York Yankee teams of the 1970s – there is no Lou Piniella for Lindy McDaniel trades there; no Graig Nettles for John Ellis trades there; no Willie Randolph for Doc Medich trades there; No Mickey Rivers trades there; etc. Or trades comparable to the best trades that built the great New York Yankee teams of the 1990s. In fact, none of the trades you mentioned even approached the significance or impact of many trades of the 1970s and 1990s.

      Clemens was a big name, but they gave up a lot for him. They gave up nothing – NOTHING for the players that formed the foundation the the great 1970s teams by comparison. And the Martinez and Cone deals were almost completely one-sided.

      Cashman’s been there for 15 years and that’s the best you or any one can do: Nick Swisher, Bobby Abreu, etc. That says it all. Do you think Brian Cashman’s job security might have something to do with the fact that Cashman’s father was a close personal friend of George Steinbrenner?

      @ Raf:

    113. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 8:55 pm

      “In other words, you’ve got noting. BTW, 2010 isn’t 2011″

      I don’t have a father that was a close personal friend of George Steinbrenner, and I don’t have a Louise Neathway in my life, but I don’t have nothing either.

      @ Raf:

    114. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 8:58 pm

      Have you ever met Brian Cashman personally, by any chance? Why are you attempting to defend the indefensible?

      @ Raf:

    115. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 9:07 pm

      “Justice, Abreu, Swisher, Clemens, Knoblauch, to name a few. Let’s see how you spin these. Should be entertaining watching you make yourself dizzy”

      In conclusion, none of these trades are “on par” with the ones I mentioned. The ones I mentioned were steals; almost completely one-sided. None of these fall into that category.

      But you were correct: these represent the “best” Cashman has done in 15 years.

      @ Raf:

    116. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 9:13 pm

      “You may want to take a look at the line Montero posted last year. If he’s a backup or emergency catcher, then he isn’t worth that much. If he is a DH, he isn’t worth that much, as evidenced by the price of DH’s around the league.”

      He is a twenty-two year-old kid that is putting up pretty good numbers at his age. He’s not going to sit on the bench. He will continue to get better, and even if he does not start, he will provide valuable roster flexibility with his ability to catch. He did not show up to camp 30 pounds overweight; he has not been arrested in the last year. He will be a middle-of-the-lineup presence for years to come, while Pineda is a right-handed reliever out of the pen.

      @ Raf:

    117. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 9:19 pm

      “And, more importantly, the Giants missed the playoffs in 2011, 2004-09, 2001, 1998-99.”

      Yes. That’s much more important. Its a shame my father did not become a close personal friend of an owner of a M.L.B. team.

      @ Raf:

    118. MJ Recanati
      November 20th, 2012 | 10:16 am

      McMillan wrote:

      Have you ever met Brian Cashman personally, by any chance? Why are you attempting to defend the indefensible?

      Your opinion of what constitutes “indefensible” does not make it objectively “indefensible.” In order to save the skin on your fingertips — which must certainly be raw at this point — just agree to disagree and call it a day on this thread.

      McMillan wrote:

      …I don’t have a Louise Neathway in my life…

      Why, exactly, does it bother you (or anyone, for that matter) that Brian Cashman had a relationship outside of his marriage? While I certainly don’t condone it, I don’t exactly see it as (1) my business or, more importantly, (2) relevant to the operation of the ballclub. Individuals far more important than Brian Cashman have cheated on their spouses and have been able to compartmentalize that aspect of their lives just fine. If Cashman wants to cheat on his wife, it shouldn’t bother us at all.

    119. McMillan
      November 20th, 2012 | 6:11 pm

      Recanti, Thank you for your reply…

      It does not bother me that Cashman had a relationship outside of his marriage, although I think its wrong.

      It has bothered some of us that we have had to read about Alex Rodriguez’s responsibility for the team’s elimination from the 2012 playoffs in all of the N.Y. tabloids primarily for one reason and one reason only: because people do not like Rodriguez for the person that he is – he is an easy target. No one made the argument that if other players – players that Cashman was responsible for assembling into a postseason lineup, had hit around Rodriguez (Granderson, Martin, Swisher, Teixeira, etc.), perhaps Rodriguez might have seen better pitches or counts, for example. And those players did not receive the same treatment Rodriguez did.

      A person was made a scapegoat to a large extent. Should that bother you at all? Not if its Alex Rodriguez? Is Brian Cashman a more likable or a better person?

      I did not see one statement from Cashman accepting responsibility for the team’s collapse. And I did not read one article in the same tabloids assigning such responsibility to Cashman. And Cashman is the G.M. who supposedly put the team together – he refers to it as “[his] All-Or-Nothing Big Hairy Monster Team,” doesn’t he? I did not see Cashman do much to deflect the criticism from Rodriguez which in my opinion was part of Cashman’s job.

      Brian Cashman got – and has held, this job because of his family’s relationship with the Steinbrenner family – that’s not just my impression or opinion, it has been reported in links I have referenced as well (before you parse this last sentence, Raf, I realize this does not constitute “fact;” thank you), and I don’t see the great accomplishment in outspending most teams in M.L.B. by a wide margin every year and getting into an expanded postseason every year – only to be eliminated without even a pennant to show for a $200 million payroll (not necessary to parse or comment on this last sentence either, Raf; thank you again).

      If a person brings scandal and negative publicity of this type to an organization, and exercises such poor character and judgment in his personal life, then it speaks to his credibility and capacity to perform his job. And if a person has no credibility in what he says, then why should any one listen to him provide explanation as to the team’s “construction” or repeated postseason failures?

      It doesn’t bother me that Cashman had a relationship outside of his marriage, it bothers me that I can not follow a team I have followed for 40 years without having to read comments from a G.M. with no credibility on matters of his record, his personnel decisions, or disciplinary measures concerning his players, for example; a G.M. that does not treat his players or his family as well as his employer has treated him.

      I could stomach a Brian Cashman press conference a little bit more if he was a better person or a better G.M.; but he is neither, in what I consider to be my “defensible” opinion.

      @ MJ Recanati:

    120. McMillan
      November 20th, 2012 | 6:59 pm

      “And, more importantly, the Giants missed the playoffs in 2011, 2004-09, 2001, 1998-99.”

      Is it possible the Giants missed the playoffs in some of those years because they have had what is commonly-referred to as a “budget” to work within, and therefore have had to periodically rebuild? “Rebuild” means to restructure a team’s personnel so that it can compete within a “budget” in the future – for the benefit of those fans that might be unfamiliar with the term having followed Mr. Cashman’s teams.

      @ Raf:

    121. Raf
      November 20th, 2012 | 7:19 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      just agree to disagree and call it a day on this thread.

      Already have, especially since now it has spilled over to another thread.

    122. McMillan
      November 26th, 2012 | 9:45 pm

      Eli Whiteside, Yankees agree to $625,000 deal

      Jeter
      Granderson
      Cano
      Teixeira
      Rodriguez


      Whiteside
      Gardner

      http://sports.yahoo.com/news/eli-whiteside-yankees-agree-625-184400593–mlb.html

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