• Cashman: This Is My All Or Nothing Big Hairy Monster Team!

    Posted by on October 15th, 2012 · Comments (122)

    Via David Lennon nine days ago:

    The architect of these Yankees offers no apologies for the all-or-nothing attack of the 2012 Bronx Bombers . It’s no happy accident that they led the majors with 245 home runs (the most in franchise history), went deep in a major league- record 131 of 162 games and relied on the long ball for a third of their RBI production.

    This is by design, and general manager Brian Cashman loves what he sees from this power-mad roster.

    “I want a team that walks and mashes,” Cashman said. “And if you can mash and hit home runs, then you can hit singles and doubles, too. We’re not going to hit triples. But we’re built the way we are for a reason.

    “I’m still using the Gene Michael playbook, and this is about getting big, hairy monsters that mash and are selective at the plate. There’s a reason we’re perennially at the top of runs scored.”

    That’s the bottom line, right? There’s no extra credit for taking longer to get around the bases, no additional style points for nifty bunts or dramatic steals.

    When Joe Girardi faced questions earlier this season about the Yankees’ occasional lapses with situational hitting– as he often does — he explained that home runs are just part of his team’s DNA.

    As for runners in scoring position, well, Girardi pointed out that his players don’t need to be standing at second base for that. It happens as soon as they step into the batter’s box.

    “Our bread-and-butter has been the long ball,” Nick Swisher said. “The Yankees have been doing that for years. On some teams, a guy may get a base hit, steal second and then there’s a single for him to score. With us, we might walk and then hit a two-run jack.”

    Great plan. It’s working out really well this post-season…

    Comments on Cashman: This Is My All Or Nothing Big Hairy Monster Team!

    1. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 5:29 pm

      “Meanwhile, Yankees drafts since 1965. Have at it, you’ll see that Cashman isn’t much better than his predecessors when it comes to the draft.”

      For some reason, this organization has not done well drafting or developing young starting pitching going back to the 1960s… I have no explanation for it – they’re the New York Yankees. Just to continue with the Cashman bashing, however: what has he done to address that?

      @ Raf:

    2. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 5:33 pm

      “You may want to look up the value of DH’s and backup catchers, then.”

      The value of a young kid that hits as well as Montero and that can be a backup or emergency catcher is pretty HIGH.
      @ Raf:

    3. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 5:47 pm

      “Players that were there in 2010 & 2011 and 2012. So what happened?”

      This question is an example of why I have had to repeat myself: what happened was that Cashman’s “All-Or-Nothing Big Hairy Monster Team” was composed of aging players that do not hit in October. And all of the New York tabloids blamed Alex Rodriguez for the fact that Nick Swisher, Curtis Granderson, Russell Martin, and Mark Teixeira did not hit along with Rodriguez – instead of Brian Cashman for having put this team together.

      What happened in 2009 was that Rodriguez miraculously hit in October; if he doesn’t, they don’t win in 2009 either.

      @ Raf:

    4. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 6:00 pm

      “Boggs, FA. Key, FA. Duncan, FA. Cone, retained as FA. Rogers, FA. Dion James, FA. Gooden, FA. Fernandez, FA.”

      Boggs was not part of the 1998 – 2000 teams; Brosius was acquired in a trade for Kenny Rogers. Cone was also acquired in a trade. Duncan was not part of the 1998 – 2000 teams. Fernandez was not part of the team after 1995. Gooden was a No. 4 starter. Dion James was hardly a centerpiece.

      @ Raf:

    5. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 6:07 pm

      “Take a look at his peripherals.”

      Do you mean Pineda’s waistline?

      @ Raf:

    6. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 6:23 pm

      “162 > 9. Always.”

      I assume this means that the regular season is more important than the post season, although I don’t know where the ‘9’ comes from.

      Suppose Brian Cashman writes $250 million worth of checks in 2013 and spends the additional $50 million on offense and wins more regular season games as a result, and his team sets records in every offensive category; however the team is still eliminated in the first round of the playoffs. Is he to be regarded as a better G.M. because he won more regular season games? Should his million-dollar salary be increased?

      @ Raf:

    7. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 6:29 pm

      The question of the day is “[W]hat has Brian Cashman’s most successful trade been in his 15-year tenure as General Manager of the New York Yankees? I can’t get an answer from Raf, and I don’t believe the Nick Swisher trade speaks to an impressive record if that’s the best Cashman has done in 15 years…

      @ MJ Recanati:

    8. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 6:50 pm

      “It’s simple, if he were examined in an objective way, this thread would not have reached 90+ posts”

      Raf’s right. What could be more objective than the payroll figures provided for the last ten years, and the number of championships won in that timeframe compared to other franchises and their respective payrolls? Or the cost of each victory?

      In 2012, Brian Cashman paid $2,083,813.56 for each regular season win; the American League Champion Detroit Tigers paid $1,503,409.09 for each regular season win; the World Champion San Francisco Giants paid $1,251,283.86 for each regular season win.

      According to Raf, ALTHOUGH the San Francisco Giants paid $832,529.70 LESS for each regular season win than the New York Yankees AND WON a WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP, Brian Cashman is a better G.M. than the Giants’ Brian Sabean because the Yankees won 95 regular season games and the Giants won only 94.

      @ Raf:

    9. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 7:16 pm

      *Notes that McMillan conveniently ignores that Granderson hit 40+ HR, and was nowhere to be found when AJax posted a .249/.317/.374 line a year ago… Next!”

      I ignored the 40+ HR because what matters to me is October… And Ajax certainly outperformed Granderson in the postseason in 2012, didn’t he? And to paraphrase yourself, you can not get to the World Series without winning a League Championship Series. And you can’t get the a League Championship Series without winning in the regular season.

      And what did Ajax hit in the regular season? .300? What did Granderson hit? .232? How many times did Granderson strike out in the regular season? 195? What is the 11th-highest strikeout total in MLB history? 195? Who traded Ajax for Granderson? Cashman? …Next!

      @ Raf:

    10. Raf
      November 19th, 2012 | 7:42 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      All I’ve got to say about the comments in this thread is…jeez. SMH.

      Looks like McMillan’s trying to make up for lost time…

    11. Raf
      November 19th, 2012 | 7:58 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      You’re very good at parsing statements and responding to them out-of-context.

      You’re shotgunning, and I have neither the time nor wherewithal to respond to every single line you post, especially when you repeat things over and over again. So, I take bits and pieces wherever I can.

      McMillan wrote:

      Name one trade Brian Cashman has made on par with the Martinez deal, or the Cone deal, or all of the trades that built the great 1970s teams (Chambliss, Randolph, Piniella, Nettles, Randolph, Rivers, Figueroa, etc.), for example. Name 1 trade in his 15 years… Its a simple question. Name 1 trade in 15 years?@ Raf:

      Justice, Abreu, Swisher, Clemens, Knoblauch, to name a few. Let’s see how you spin these. Should be entertaining watching you make yourself dizzy 🙂

      McMillan wrote:

      Posada was done in 2010; and Montero was 20 years old at the time – he wasn’t even old enough to drink legally and get into a car and drive around Florida in a state of intoxication as Michael Pineda has been doing while recovering from shoulder surgery.

      In other words, you’ve got noting. BTW, 2010 isn’t 2011 😉

      McMillan wrote:

      The value of a young kid that hits as well as Montero and that can be a backup or emergency catcher is pretty HIGH.

      You may want to take a look at the line Montero posted last year. If he’s a backup or emergency catcher, then he isn’t worth that much. If he is a DH, he isn’t worth that much, as evidenced by the price of DH’s around the league.

      McMillan wrote:

      What could be more objective than the payroll figures provided for the last ten years, and the number of championships won in that timeframe compared to other franchises and their respective payrolls? Or the cost of each victory?

      Easy, looking at the payroll figures the last 10 years as well as how each of those teams have performed during the regular season and the postseason. Take a look at the roster construction while you’re at it.

      McMillan wrote:

      According to Raf, ALTHOUGH the San Francisco Giants paid $832,529.70 LESS for each regular season win than the New York Yankees AND WON a WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP, Brian Cashman is a better G.M. than the Giants’ Brian Sabean because the Yankees won 95 regular season games and the Giants won only 94.

      And, more importantly, the Giants missed the playoffs in 2011, 2004-09, 2001, 1998-99.

    12. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 8:49 pm

      “Justice, Abreu, Swisher, Clemens, Knoblauch, to name a few. Let’s see how you spin these. Should be entertaining watching you make yourself dizzy”

      Thank you.

      Justice and Abreu were certainly good trades; and so was Swisher. But Swisher was the best, in my opinion. However, by no stretch of the imagination was this trade comparable to either the Tino Martinez deal or the David Cone deal, or the deals that built the great teams of the 1970s – not even close, in terms of both its significance and impact, and as a reflection of the qualifications and skills of the G.M. associated with the transaction.

      Clemens was acquired in exchange for a pitcher that went 18-4 and threw a perfect game, and pitched for a team that won 125 total games in addition to two other very good players. Knoblauch was acquired in exchange for Eric Milton, Cristian Guzman, and other prospects… Was the Knoblauch trade better than the Randolph trade?

      None of the trades you mentioned were better than the best trades that built the great New York Yankee teams of the 1970s – there is no Lou Piniella for Lindy McDaniel trades there; no Graig Nettles for John Ellis trades there; no Willie Randolph for Doc Medich trades there; No Mickey Rivers trades there; etc. Or trades comparable to the best trades that built the great New York Yankee teams of the 1990s. In fact, none of the trades you mentioned even approached the significance or impact of many trades of the 1970s and 1990s.

      Clemens was a big name, but they gave up a lot for him. They gave up nothing – NOTHING for the players that formed the foundation the the great 1970s teams by comparison. And the Martinez and Cone deals were almost completely one-sided.

      Cashman’s been there for 15 years and that’s the best you or any one can do: Nick Swisher, Bobby Abreu, etc. That says it all. Do you think Brian Cashman’s job security might have something to do with the fact that Cashman’s father was a close personal friend of George Steinbrenner?

      @ Raf:

    13. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 8:55 pm

      “In other words, you’ve got noting. BTW, 2010 isn’t 2011”

      I don’t have a father that was a close personal friend of George Steinbrenner, and I don’t have a Louise Neathway in my life, but I don’t have nothing either.

      @ Raf:

    14. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 8:58 pm

      Have you ever met Brian Cashman personally, by any chance? Why are you attempting to defend the indefensible?

      @ Raf:

    15. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 9:07 pm

      “Justice, Abreu, Swisher, Clemens, Knoblauch, to name a few. Let’s see how you spin these. Should be entertaining watching you make yourself dizzy”

      In conclusion, none of these trades are “on par” with the ones I mentioned. The ones I mentioned were steals; almost completely one-sided. None of these fall into that category.

      But you were correct: these represent the “best” Cashman has done in 15 years.

      @ Raf:

    16. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 9:13 pm

      “You may want to take a look at the line Montero posted last year. If he’s a backup or emergency catcher, then he isn’t worth that much. If he is a DH, he isn’t worth that much, as evidenced by the price of DH’s around the league.”

      He is a twenty-two year-old kid that is putting up pretty good numbers at his age. He’s not going to sit on the bench. He will continue to get better, and even if he does not start, he will provide valuable roster flexibility with his ability to catch. He did not show up to camp 30 pounds overweight; he has not been arrested in the last year. He will be a middle-of-the-lineup presence for years to come, while Pineda is a right-handed reliever out of the pen.

      @ Raf:

    17. McMillan
      November 19th, 2012 | 9:19 pm

      “And, more importantly, the Giants missed the playoffs in 2011, 2004-09, 2001, 1998-99.”

      Yes. That’s much more important. Its a shame my father did not become a close personal friend of an owner of a M.L.B. team.

      @ Raf:

    18. MJ Recanati
      November 20th, 2012 | 10:16 am

      McMillan wrote:

      Have you ever met Brian Cashman personally, by any chance? Why are you attempting to defend the indefensible?

      Your opinion of what constitutes “indefensible” does not make it objectively “indefensible.” In order to save the skin on your fingertips — which must certainly be raw at this point — just agree to disagree and call it a day on this thread.

      McMillan wrote:

      …I don’t have a Louise Neathway in my life…

      Why, exactly, does it bother you (or anyone, for that matter) that Brian Cashman had a relationship outside of his marriage? While I certainly don’t condone it, I don’t exactly see it as (1) my business or, more importantly, (2) relevant to the operation of the ballclub. Individuals far more important than Brian Cashman have cheated on their spouses and have been able to compartmentalize that aspect of their lives just fine. If Cashman wants to cheat on his wife, it shouldn’t bother us at all.

    19. McMillan
      November 20th, 2012 | 6:11 pm

      Recanti, Thank you for your reply…

      It does not bother me that Cashman had a relationship outside of his marriage, although I think its wrong.

      It has bothered some of us that we have had to read about Alex Rodriguez’s responsibility for the team’s elimination from the 2012 playoffs in all of the N.Y. tabloids primarily for one reason and one reason only: because people do not like Rodriguez for the person that he is – he is an easy target. No one made the argument that if other players – players that Cashman was responsible for assembling into a postseason lineup, had hit around Rodriguez (Granderson, Martin, Swisher, Teixeira, etc.), perhaps Rodriguez might have seen better pitches or counts, for example. And those players did not receive the same treatment Rodriguez did.

      A person was made a scapegoat to a large extent. Should that bother you at all? Not if its Alex Rodriguez? Is Brian Cashman a more likable or a better person?

      I did not see one statement from Cashman accepting responsibility for the team’s collapse. And I did not read one article in the same tabloids assigning such responsibility to Cashman. And Cashman is the G.M. who supposedly put the team together – he refers to it as “[his] All-Or-Nothing Big Hairy Monster Team,” doesn’t he? I did not see Cashman do much to deflect the criticism from Rodriguez which in my opinion was part of Cashman’s job.

      Brian Cashman got – and has held, this job because of his family’s relationship with the Steinbrenner family – that’s not just my impression or opinion, it has been reported in links I have referenced as well (before you parse this last sentence, Raf, I realize this does not constitute “fact;” thank you), and I don’t see the great accomplishment in outspending most teams in M.L.B. by a wide margin every year and getting into an expanded postseason every year – only to be eliminated without even a pennant to show for a $200 million payroll (not necessary to parse or comment on this last sentence either, Raf; thank you again).

      If a person brings scandal and negative publicity of this type to an organization, and exercises such poor character and judgment in his personal life, then it speaks to his credibility and capacity to perform his job. And if a person has no credibility in what he says, then why should any one listen to him provide explanation as to the team’s “construction” or repeated postseason failures?

      It doesn’t bother me that Cashman had a relationship outside of his marriage, it bothers me that I can not follow a team I have followed for 40 years without having to read comments from a G.M. with no credibility on matters of his record, his personnel decisions, or disciplinary measures concerning his players, for example; a G.M. that does not treat his players or his family as well as his employer has treated him.

      I could stomach a Brian Cashman press conference a little bit more if he was a better person or a better G.M.; but he is neither, in what I consider to be my “defensible” opinion.

      @ MJ Recanati:

    20. McMillan
      November 20th, 2012 | 6:59 pm

      “And, more importantly, the Giants missed the playoffs in 2011, 2004-09, 2001, 1998-99.”

      Is it possible the Giants missed the playoffs in some of those years because they have had what is commonly-referred to as a “budget” to work within, and therefore have had to periodically rebuild? “Rebuild” means to restructure a team’s personnel so that it can compete within a “budget” in the future – for the benefit of those fans that might be unfamiliar with the term having followed Mr. Cashman’s teams.

      @ Raf:

    21. Raf
      November 20th, 2012 | 7:19 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      just agree to disagree and call it a day on this thread.

      Already have, especially since now it has spilled over to another thread.

    22. McMillan
      November 26th, 2012 | 9:45 pm

      Eli Whiteside, Yankees agree to $625,000 deal

      Jeter
      Granderson
      Cano
      Teixeira
      Rodriguez


      Whiteside
      Gardner

      http://sports.yahoo.com/news/eli-whiteside-yankees-agree-625-184400593–mlb.html

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