• Two Post-ALCS Brian Cashman Quotes That Should Scare Yankees Fans

    Posted by on October 19th, 2012 · Comments (41)

    Here they are:

    “I’m not going to turn myself into the Bronx Bunters because all of a sudden we didn’t hit for this week in October. That’s not our DNA. That’s not what makes us successful. And that’s certainly not what’s getting us into the postseason every year.” (Source.)

    “I don’t care if it’s old; I care if it’s good. There’s some old guys that are good. Andy Pettitte is good. Raul Ibanez turned out to be really good. He’s old. But at the end of the day, these guys are really competitive, they’re good at what they do, they’re great professionals and if you compare that to the remaining choices, despite their ages, they look really good. Hiroki Kuroda is an older player. Ichiro Suzuki is an older player, and these guys contributed to that win column despite their age. And why? Because they were better than any of the younger guys we had choices for. So I’m not going to apologize for it. We go there, and we are old. If you’re old and still good, then it’s not an issue.” (Source.)

    Of course, older players breakdown easier and need more days off. And, we’ve seen what happens to all or nothing sluggers in the post-season. But, that’s not stopping Brian, the best G.M. in baseball!

    Comments on Two Post-ALCS Brian Cashman Quotes That Should Scare Yankees Fans

    1. Corey
      October 19th, 2012 | 6:05 pm

      But, that’s not stopping Brian, the best G.M. in baseball!
      ========
      It’s funny, I’m fairly sure that you are the only one here who has ever called him the best GM in baseball (obviously here it’s sarcasm).

    2. October 19th, 2012 | 6:15 pm

      @ Corey:
      Is he not the highest paid GM in baseball, then, of course, he must be the best!

    3. nwyank
      October 19th, 2012 | 6:36 pm

      True. These 2 quotes do scare me.
      Roster full of low BA, high strike out, swing for the fences hitters is not working, at least in the post season. Cashman sees it differently, I guess.

    4. Raf
      October 19th, 2012 | 6:59 pm

      Yeah, let’s all panic because of a couple of bad weeks, or a bad week in the ALCS.

      For the season, in the AL the Yanks were

      2nd in BB, R/G & Runs
      5th in hits
      4th in doubles & AVG
      1st in HR’s
      8th in K’s
      1st in OBP, SLG & TB

    5. tampayankeefan
      October 19th, 2012 | 7:31 pm

      Years of mediocrity are assured. Baby stienbrenners are not their father, they think we are suckers and will pay to watch crap. 4th place is now secure.

    6. October 19th, 2012 | 7:52 pm

      I mean this in all seriousness, this guy needs to be drug tested. The Yankees humiliated themselves on a national stage. They were so bad I think most fans tuned out. You couldn’t watch it. There were over 11 thousand seats available for the not to be played game 6 on Tuesday. Fans were angry. Look at those quotes, there is a complete lack of understanding of the fan base. We know the stadium had a much emptier look this year, we know the YES rating were way off this year, yet what we get from the GM is a sneer, and a there’s nothing you can do to stop me attitude. Note to Hal and Hank, be careful how much power and confidence you put in this guy. Suggested reading for both, The “Decline and Fall of the New York Yankees” written after the 66 season. Here’s another quote,”those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it”.

    7. KPOcala
      October 19th, 2012 | 11:46 pm

      @ Raf:
      Raf, you nailed it. People are talking as though the Yankees should start playing ‘small ball’, something to make George Will happy. And even if we’re both wrong, what are the alternatives? Probably one pitcher, Greinke, who could make a difference for the Yankees (and hopefully we re-sign Kuroda). And of the rest, who is better than what we have? Unless Cashman can parlay a move involving Granderson into another outfielder and someone from the Minors pops up in the spring, the alternatives aren’t palatable. One thing that “I” would consider, move Cano to third, find a strong defender to replace him, and make A-Rod a platoon DH. The move would lengthen Cano’s effective career, even though his “SABR value” would suffer from the shift. So be it. Any thoughts?

    8. 77yankees
      October 20th, 2012 | 12:28 am

      How come the Yanks weren’t old when they won 95 games & a playoff round?

      And how come we don’t hear about how old the Angels are with Mike Trout & Jered Weaver? Or Tampa with David Price & Evan Longoria? Or the Dodgers with Matt Kemp & Clayton Kershaw?

      Oh, that’s right – those teams didn’t even make the postseason.

    9. Dimelo
      October 20th, 2012 | 2:25 pm

      Given what we know now, those quotes are scary. However, when things are going well and the Yanks are plating runners, then the philosophy works and everyone is happy. As Raf pointed out, there’s a lot of evidence supporting Cashman here…but then we see what just happened in the playoffs…then we start to puff out our chest and play Monday morning quarterback. Yell out the top of our lungs how the strategy is absolutely awful and will not work. I’m including myself in the latter.

      I don’t even know what the answer is, it’s easy to say…get younger, more athletic, and guys that can hit in the playoffs. The problem is, who are those guys? Where do we get them?

      I get the philosophy from Cashman when he says, “we need to mix in younger players and veterans”. The way that Cashman explained how the “mixing” was going to happen was thru the draft. There aren’t many position players that came up thru the draft in the last 5 years that are helping out the major league club. So in that regard, he has absolutely failed.

      But then there’s the other part, the Yanks have one championship in the last 5 years, and in the last 5 years the Yanks have as follows: 3 AL east titles, one playoff birth via the wild-card, and one year where they weren’t in the post-season. Based on that measurement, and the idea that you can’t build a team based on being a good playoff team because you first have to get there, then in that regard Cashman has done a pretty damn good job.

      So what’s the right way to judge this guy? I’m seriously torn because I watch this ALCS and I want to blame the architect, then when you start to look at this all rationally then you start to understand all the angles and the answer is not that simple.

      I don’t really know how to judge Cash anymore.

    10. Greg H.
      October 21st, 2012 | 12:12 pm

      Dimelo wrote:

      So what’s the right way to judge this guy?

      The only way to judge him is how many times the team makes the playoffs, not by what happens once they get there, no matter how tempting it is – and this year it was beyond tempting.

      77yankees wrote:

      And how come we don’t hear about how old the Angels are with Mike Trout & Jered Weaver? Or Tampa with David Price & Evan Longoria? Or the Dodgers with Matt Kemp & Clayton Kershaw?

      This.

      Also bear in mind that the Phillies broke the bank to get the right players for a repeated run, and came up with two eliminations at the hands of “lesser” teams (’10 Giants and ’11 Cards) when their big sticks got to the playoffs and didn’t score or hit homers, and then missed the playoffs entirely this year.

      Bottom line, every year 8 very good teams make the playoffs and 7 of them get eliminated.

    11. McMillan
      December 3rd, 2012 | 3:24 pm

      Joseph Maloney wrote:

      I mean this in all seriousness, this guy needs to be drug tested.

      It looks as if the Wall Street Journal might be in agreement: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324355904578155523082682716.html

      Cashman: “It’s All Going as Planned.”

      “His starting catcher is gone. His right fielder is off searching for bigger dollars in free agency. His top setup reliever is doing the same. Yet Yankees general manager Brian Cashman thinks this off-season is going exactly as planned…

      “I think we’re having a successful early campaign to our winter because we’ve been able to acquire/retain some real high-caliber, high-end starting pitching on one-year deals… Rest assured we are going to put out a product that most cities would say, ‘Man, I wish we could do that. I wish I could run that type of team out there,’ Cashman said. ‘I don’t care how old it is or what…’”

    12. McMillan
      December 3rd, 2012 | 3:57 pm

      Dimelo wrote:

      Based on… the idea that you can’t build a team based on being a good playoff team because you first have to get there…

      Why can’t you build a team on BOTH getting there AND being a good playoff team at the SAME time? Especially if you have a $200 million payroll budget…

    13. McMillan
      December 3rd, 2012 | 4:08 pm

      Dimelo wrote:

      [T]hose quotes are scary…

      How scary is this one: “People should still be leery of us and afraid of us as the stalking horse and that’s good. I want them to think that.?”

    14. MJ Recanati
      December 3rd, 2012 | 5:04 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      Why can’t you build a team on BOTH getting there AND being a good playoff team at the SAME time?

      Because there’s no magic formula to being a good playoff team. We’ve seen poor-hitting teams light up the playoffs with their bats. We’ve seen average pitchers become dominant for a few weeks in October. We’ve seen teams that could normally field suddenly become a bunch of soccer players out there, kicking the ball around. And, with the Yankees, we’ve seen league-leading offensive players suddenly lose their batting stroke.

      The long and the short of it is this: if it were so easy to capture exactly what makes for a successful playoff formula — especially in this age where you have to win 11 or 12 games to win the title instead of just four or eight as it was before the divisional series and the wild-card game were introduced — then teams would’ve done so. Clearly, however, since all sorts of different teams have won, this is not the case.

    15. MJ Recanati
      December 3rd, 2012 | 5:06 pm

      @ McMillan:
      My comments above are going to be it for me in this conversation. You’re free to get the last word — or half-dozen posts, as is your modus operandi — I just wanted to make sure you read something coherent before you went off and started arguing against yourself.

    16. McMillan
      December 3rd, 2012 | 6:34 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      And, with the Yankees, we’ve seen league-leading offensive players suddenly lose their batting stroke.

      There is no magic formula, but a team is not going to win with a lineup of players that do not hit in Oct.; the team did not suddenly lose its batting stroke: Rodriguez hit .273 vs. Min. in ’10, .190 vs. Tex. in ’10, .111 vs. Det. in ’11, .125 vs. Bal. in ’12, and .111 vs. Det. in ’12. Martin hit .176 vs. Det. in 2011, .176 vs. Bal. in ’12, and .143 vs. Det. in ’12;

      in 9 playoff series, Teixeira has hit higher than .200 only 3 times, and .222 overall (under contract to age 37); in 11 playoff series, Swisher has hit higher than .250 only 2 times, and .169 in overall. He is one of the worst hitters in postseason history statistically. That the offense performed so poorly in the postseason should not have been a surprise to a G.M. earning an annual base salary of $3 mil.

      As you said, this is an age where you have to win 11 and not 4 or 7 games to win a title. Thus it is somewhat more unlikely that a lesser-hitting or fielding team, or a lesser starting rotation, will win a 3rd postseason series. And I don’t think we’ve seen poor-hitting teams light up a postseason too often. A successful playoff formula is not the problem, it is the implementation that is not easy. But the Yankees have had $200 mil. annual payrolls for some time, have they not?

      Even if the team had re-signed Martin and Swisher, it would not have won in 2013 – it would not have had the postseason lineup to do so – certainly not with this rotation. I understand that you might disagree, but…

      And many teams have captured what makes for a successful playoff formula; Det. has not won – yet, but they are favorites to win in 2013 because they have such a formula in place: starting pitching, defense, and a postseason lineup with Martinez (.274) and Hunter (.305) added to Young, Cabrera, etc. that can hit in Oct., etc. And don’t be surprised if they’re the favorites again in 2014 and beyond. They’ll win with this front office in place – they are not going to forget how to build such a team or become incapable of doing so if they must rebuild in the future or otherwise.

      Det. fans will not be saying, “there’s hope: our average pitchers might become dominant for a few weeks in Oct. – its happened before,” or “our poor-hitting offense might light up the playoffs with their bats” in 2013, 2014… St. Louis was an example of a different team that won, but they were built for Busch Stadium under a formula Herzog implemented in K.C. and had Andujar, Forsch, Sutter, solid defense, and a lineup that could hit or manufacture runs in Oct.

    17. McMillan
      December 3rd, 2012 | 6:38 pm

      Thanks for the advice.
      @ MJ Recanati:

    18. McMillan
      December 4th, 2012 | 11:58 am

      McMillan wrote:

      A successful playoff formula is not the problem, it is the implementation that is not easy.

      “If we were to build a team… the equivalent of {Herzog’s Cardinals]… that team… could be among the best in baseball, simply because their defense would be a… work of art, and their offense would be solid top-to-bottom… [T]he starting lineup would cost well under $40 mil. [in 2011], and even with excessively expensive starting pitchers… the total player payroll could come in under $75 mil… [W]hy haven’t other teams gone down this path? Part of it probably has to do with how difficult it is to find those types of players…”

      There are formulas. A lineup of hitters that do not hit in Oct. are not part of any of them; neither is a changing rotation from year-to-year.

    19. McMillan
      December 5th, 2012 | 12:36 pm

      In 6 days it has gone from: “people should still be leery of us and afraid of us as the stalking horse,” to “we are capable of doing a lot of different things and are not out of thinking big,” to “beggars can’t be choosers.”

    20. Ricketson
      December 6th, 2012 | 11:46 am

      @ McMillan:
      The Star Ledger did not report on whether or not someone informed Cashman that a stalking horse is a “figure that tests a concept with someone, or mounts a challenge against someone on behalf of an anonymous third party.”

    21. McMillan
      December 6th, 2012 | 12:43 pm

      @ Ricketson:
      One would think Cashman would have been more familiar with the term: his father was a “horse” trainer and close personal friend of the Steinbrenners, and as far as “stalking” is concerned…

      In 7 days, it has now gone from: “People should still be leery of us and afraid of us as the stalking horse…” to: “Teams and agents have lined up to take advantage of the Yankees’ depleted roster, hoping to force Cashman into a panic move.” – The New York Times, Dec. 6, 2012. And “Cashman declined to meet with the media, which is a rarity.” A real man of character.

    22. Ricketson
      December 6th, 2012 | 1:23 pm

      @ McMillan:
      “‘So far, what’s transpired, I wouldn’t do,’ Cashman said. ‘In terms of what’s happened this particular week, those opportunities, I’m comfortable with. That’s all.’”

    23. McMillan
      December 6th, 2012 | 1:45 pm

      @ Ricketson:
      “Ain’t no sense worrying: If you have no control over something, ain’t no sense worrying about it -you have no control over it anyway. If you do have control, why worry? So either way, there ain’t no sense worrying.” I’m not certain if this is a quote of Brian Cashman or Mickey Rivers; I get the two confused sometimes…

    24. MJ Recanati
      December 6th, 2012 | 1:51 pm

      @ Ricketson:
      @ McMillan:
      Level with me guys: you’re the same person, right?

    25. Ricketson
      December 6th, 2012 | 2:22 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      I’m not certain if this is a quote of Brian Cashman or Mickey Rivers; I get the two confused sometimes…

      Cashman is the one with an I.Q. of 160 – “out of 1000.”

    26. Raf
      December 6th, 2012 | 3:05 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      @ Ricketson:
      @ McMillan:
      Level with me guys: you’re the same person, right?

      Wouldn’t surprise me if that were the case, but I doubt it; they’re parallel in their beliefs, but not in their methodologies. One of ‘em has mentioned the NYDN comments section, so it wouldn’t surprise me if WW gained a few regulars from the typical MSM outlets (NY Post, NYDN, WFAN, etc), especially since they’re parroting the typical “zomg, cashman sux” line that has been popular here the past few seasons.

      If that’s the case, heaven help us, there may be more on the way! :P

      But, to be fair, they haven’t gone or gotten as stupid as the typical commenters/posters that you’d normally find in those forums (though taking Cashman’s words at face value may come somewhat close…), so at least they have that going for them. :D

    27. McMillan
      December 6th, 2012 | 3:13 pm

      @ Ricketson:
      And it was Rivers that said, “[T]hese guys are so old, they’re eligible for meals on wheels,” commenting on the age of Texas Rangers teammates Bill Stein and Larry Biittner, not Cashman commenting on the age of the New York Yankees’ $209,792,900.00 2012 division-winning team?

      And it was Rivers that said, “I’m not going to double my limit,” in response to an interview question asking him about how many bases he was going to steal in a season, and not Cashman in response to an interview question asking him about how much money he was going to spend in the 2013 offseason with a $189,000,000.00 luxury tax threshold in 2014?

      And it was Rivers that said, “[T]he climax are not the same,” referring to the states of Florida and Texas, and not Kim Brennan or Louise Neathway, referring to Brian Cashman?

    28. Ricketson
      December 6th, 2012 | 3:40 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      And it was Rivers that said, “[T]hese guys are so old, they’re eligible for meals on wheels,” commenting on the age of Texas Rangers teammates Bill Stein and Larry Biittner, not Cashman commenting on the age of the New York Yankees’ $209,792,900.00 2012 division-winning team?
      And it was Rivers that said, “I’m not going to double my limit,” in response to an interview question asking him about how many bases he was going to steal in a season, and not Cashman in response to an interview question asking him about how much money he was going to spend in the 2013 offseason with a $189,000,000.00 luxury tax threshold in 2014?
      And it was Rivers that said, “[T]he climax are not the same,” referring to the states of Florida and Texas, and not Kim Brennan or Louise Neathway, referring to Brian Cashman?

      I’m not sure about the 3rd. quote – you might be confusing a quote of Rivers with the following quote of Cashman:”Everybody here knows Kim, and they’ve known her for quite some time.” The 1st. and 2nd. quotes are quotes of Rivers.

    29. Ricketson
      December 6th, 2012 | 3:43 pm

      @ McMillan:
      “I’m real happy about how our winter program is currently going.”

    30. Ricketson
      December 6th, 2012 | 3:50 pm

      “Like every year, we try to put together the best staff possible; hopefully we’ve done that. We have a lot of experience, a lot of people our players can go to for help.”

    31. December 6th, 2012 | 4:36 pm
    32. Ricketson
      December 6th, 2012 | 5:48 pm

      “I’m not prepared to say a diagnosis other than he tweaked his back and had some stiffness. I’m not trying to be evasive, but at the same time I don’t want to say that there is something specific.”

    33. Ricketson
      December 6th, 2012 | 7:21 pm

      Dec. 5, 2012: “I certainly have been busy with a lot of ideas.” “… I want to make sure that whatever we do, hopefully you’ll look at it and say, ‘Hey, that makes sense.’ ”

    34. Raf
      December 6th, 2012 | 7:44 pm

      “Bubba Crosby will be our centerfielder in 2006.”

    35. Ricketson
      December 7th, 2012 | 11:42 am

      “I didn’t make any offers to anybody who has signed so far.”

    36. Ricketson
      December 7th, 2012 | 11:44 am

      “We have to constantly remind ourselves that we have a lot of talent.”

    37. Ricketson
      December 7th, 2012 | 11:47 am

      McMillan wrote:

      “Cashman declined to meet with the media, which is a rarity.”

      He’s better off keeping his mouth shut.

    38. Ricketson
      December 7th, 2012 | 2:10 pm

      Ricketson wrote:

      I’m not sure about the 3rd. quote – you might be confusing a quote of Rivers with the following quote of Cashman:”Everybody here knows Kim, and they’ve known her for quite some time.” The 1st. and 2nd. quotes are quotes of Rivers.

      And it was Rivers that said, “He’s so ugly he makes foul balls hook fair,” referring to Major League outfielder Danny Napoleon, and not the husband of Kim Brennan, referring to Major League executive Brian Cashman?

      And it was Rivers that said, “Me and George and Billy are two of a kind,” referring to his relationship with George Steinbrenner and Billy Martin, and not Cashman that said, “Me and Louise are two of a kind,” referring to his relationship with Louise Neathway?

      And it was Neathway’s psychiatrist that said, “Everyone was convinced that [Louise] was a danger to herself or others,” referring to Neathway and Cashman, and not Martin that said, “One is convicted and the other a born liar,” referring to Steinbrenner and Reggie Jackson?

    39. McMillan
      December 7th, 2012 | 2:23 pm

      @ Ricketson:
      Rivers said, “He’s so ugly he makes fair balls hook foul,” referring to Major League outfielder Danny Napoleon. And Martin said, “One is a born liar and the other convicted,” referring to Reggie Jackson and Steinbrenner. Cashman might have said, “Me and Louise are two of a kind.” Otherwise, you are 100% correct.

    40. Ricketson
      March 4th, 2013 | 3:50 pm

      The language of a $3 million/yr. business executive: “It’s an opportunity to do something that a lot of people don’t do or will ever do, so that’s awesome… But it’s not like on my list of something I’ve always wanted to do. I’m kind of excited for the opportunity to do it but at the same time, big-time nervous about doing it.”
      But, he added, “I would say it’s harder probably to be GM of the Yankees than jump out of an airplane.”

    41. Kamieniecki
      September 7th, 2013 | 9:45 am

      Raf wrote:

      Yeah, let’s all panic because of a couple of bad weeks, or a bad week in the ALCS.

      For the season, in the AL the Yanks were
      2nd in BB, R/G & Runs
      5th in hits
      4th in doubles & AVG
      1st in HR’s
      8th in K’s
      1st in OBP, SLG & TB

      @ Raf:
      Let us know when we can panic.

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