• Livesey Leaving Yankees

    Posted by on November 8th, 2012 · Comments (11)

    Via the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette:

    The Pirates have hired longtime scout and baseball executive Bill Livesey as senior adviser to general manager Neal Huntington, the team announced today.

    Livesey, 72, has been a professional scout with the New York Yankees since 2008 and spent 18 years with the Yankees from 1978 to 1995, eventually being promoted to vice president of player development and scouting. He was hired as the Tampa Bay Devil Rays special assistant to the general manager in 1995 and later served as director of player personnel. He has also worked for the New York Mets and Toronto Blue Jays.

    Livesey’s son, Jeff, has been the Pirates minor league hitting coordinator for the past two seasons and has worked in the Pirates’ organization for 10 years.

    I was happy when Livesey came back to the Yankees. So, I am sad now to see him go. Pittsburgh’s gain is New York’s loss, here.

    Comments on Livesey Leaving Yankees

    1. Corey
      November 8th, 2012 | 6:43 pm

      I don’t see why you’re sad about this. You think Cashman is a terrible talent evaluator but his opinion goes only as far as his scouts do. Maybe with a new scout and a fresh perspective, Cashman will make better moves.

      I think all this new blood will be good for the team. I’m especially excited for Connors being gone. I’m curious to see how the next crop of pitchers comes out.

    2. November 8th, 2012 | 7:32 pm

      Or, maybe Livesey, who has a good track record, was making recommendations that were being ignored and he said “I’m too old for this crap and he left to go work with his son.”

      After all, consider the fact that he’s leaving the Yankees to go work for the Pirates. That’s like leaving Apple to go work at McDonalds.

    3. Raf
      November 9th, 2012 | 10:09 am

      Corey wrote:

      Maybe with a new scout and a fresh perspective, Cashman will make better moves.

      It’s possible. The Yanks draft philosophy tends towards toolsy high school players along with the occasional gamble, like an Andrew Brackman. For reasons I cannot quite understand, the Yankees have rarely drafted well.

      Given the general attrition rate of prospects I’m not particulary sold on Cashman making better moves, with “fresh blood” in the scouting department, but I think the organization can do a better job than it has done historically.

      Steve L. wrote:

      After all, consider the fact that he’s leaving the Yankees to go work for the Pirates. That’s like leaving Apple to go work at McDonalds.

      McDonalds is a multibillion dollar worldwide fast food chain. When dealing with things at the executive level, things are pretty much the same no matter where you go.

    4. MJ Recanati
      November 9th, 2012 | 10:31 am

      Steve L. wrote:

      After all, consider the fact that he’s leaving the Yankees to go work for the Pirates. That’s like leaving Apple to go work at McDonalds.

      Not really, if you consider that the Pirates depend much more heavily on a successful farm system than the Yankees do. If you look at it that way, the best place to be a senior scout/personnel manager is on a team like the Pirates that place a much higher degree of emphasis on Livesey’s role than the Yankees do.

      Obviously in terms of financial muscle, the Yankees are Apple and the Pirates are small potatoes. But in terms of where scouting is most important — and where the most budget is likely to be allocated — the Pirates are probably a good spot to be.

    5. MJ Recanati
      November 9th, 2012 | 10:34 am

      Raf wrote:

      Given the general attrition rate of prospects I’m not particulary sold on Cashman making better moves, with “fresh blood” in the scouting department, but I think the organization can do a better job than it has done historically.

      Agree completely.

      What I can’t understand is why the Yankees don’t overhaul that aspect of their organization by making strategic hires from teams that have proven successful in the areas where we are weakest. Atlanta, Tampa, Texas and St. Louis seem to be doing good work in the identification and development of talent. Wave your big Yankee dick around and hire someone from one of those teams at 20% over their current salary and tell them to do it for the Yanks. Shouldn’t be hard to find qualified people to hire if you’re willing to give them an incentive to leave.

    6. November 9th, 2012 | 10:50 am

      I think that the Yankees front office is too full of people trying to protect their jobs: Levine, Trost, Cashman, Afterman, etc.

      It’s got to be a political nightmare to work in that front office.

      It’s about people with big egos trying to insulate themselves and protect their big salaries and other high-profile perks that come with working for that team in this city.

      They really don’t care about having a first rate, top notch, talent producing system. They just care about making money.

      But, that’s just IMHO.

    7. Raf
      November 9th, 2012 | 11:12 am

      Steve L. wrote:

      They really don’t care about having a first rate, top notch, talent producing system. They just care about making money.

      The system has been producing talent; Kennedy, Jackson, Coke, Montero, Clippard, Cabrera, Gardner, Robertson, etc, etc, have been performing for the Yanks or other franchises.

    8. MJ Recanati
      November 9th, 2012 | 11:48 am

      Steve L. wrote:

      think that the Yankees front office is too full of people trying to protect their jobs: Levine, Trost, Cashman, Afterman, etc…They really don’t care about having a first rate, top notch, talent producing system. They just care about making money.

      That just doesn’t make logical sense.

      First, if self-preservation is the only motivation in the front office then better results from the farm system — the one glaring laggard in the overall operation — would be part of that.

      Second, making money comes from winning. If the Yankees have (correctly, althoug somewhat disappointingly) determined that they can continue to win without maximizing the organizational talent pipeline then that’s their choice. It may not be a choice I understand or necessarily agree with but it certainly doesn’t mean they’re picking “money” over “winning” since they’re doing plenty of both. They’re just not doing it in the way I would personally do it.

    9. 77yankees
      November 9th, 2012 | 3:21 pm

      The man is 72 – maybe he just doesn’t want the grind that would come with being in such a position for the Yankees.

      Raf wrote:

      The system has been producing talent; Kennedy, Jackson, Coke, Montero, Clippard, Cabrera, Gardner, Robertson, etc, etc, have been performing for the Yanks or other franchises.

      Yep, people can point to the draft busts, but EVERY team has prospects that flame out too.

    10. MJ Recanati
      November 9th, 2012 | 4:22 pm

      77yankees wrote:

      Yep, people can point to the draft busts, but EVERY team has prospects that flame out too.

      Absolutely. People need to remember this.

      77yankees wrote:

      The man is 72 – maybe he just doesn’t want the grind that would come with being in such a position for the Yankees.

      Not only that but maybe there’s something to be said for working in the same organization as your son. I remember an NFL defensive coordinator named Monte Kiffin left his cushy job in the pros to go work on his son Lane’s staff at Tennessee about a half-decade ago. Sometimes older guys that are well-established don’t mind leaving a familiar job just for the joy of working with their kids.

    11. Kamieniecki
      October 2nd, 2013 | 9:57 pm

      Raf wrote:

      Kennedy, Jackson, Coke… Clippard… [and Cashman] have been performing for… other franchises.

      Agreed.

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