• Goose Craps On 2012 Yankees

    Posted by on December 2nd, 2012 · Comments (35)

    Your mother was a hamster and your father smelt of elderberries!

    Via Chris Elsberry with a H/T to BBTF

    And according to [Rich] Gossage, the 2012 Yankees didn’t have a clue.

    “I’ve never seen a team of great players, or at least `name’ players fall apart like they did in the playoffs. I’m just shaking my head,” Gossage told the Bird. “I’m shocked as I’m pretty sure they’re shocked. I’ve never seen a whole lineup go into a slump as they did. I didn’t think there was a great urgency in their demeanor, in the dugout or anywhere else. I didn’t see anyone throw a helmet or break a bat or anything. It just didn’t seem like there was any urgency.”

    The Yankees beat the Baltimore Orioles — barely — in the American League Divisional Series, but that lack of offense that first appeared against the O’s doomed them against the Detroit Tigers in the ALCS. Alex Rodriguez had just three hits in 25 total postseason at-bats and was benched. Robinson Cano had three hits in 40 at-bats. Curtis Granderson went 3-for-30 and Nick Swisher just 5-for-30. As a team, New York hit .188 in the postseason and just .157 in the ALCS, scoring six runs.

    And watching from his television set in Colorado Springs, Colo., Gossage couldn’t believe what he was seeing.

    “It just didn’t seem like the enthusiasm as a team was there,” he said. “I saw him (Rodriguez) smiling a lot in the dugout and just kind of nonchalanting everything … he wasn’t acting like a real team guy. I just didn’t like the demeanor of the whole team. (Nick) Swisher was smiling and laughing … I wanted to see somebody fire a bat at something or have someone get in someone’s face once in a while. That’s what you need sometimes.”

    Like the treatment that Gossage — or any other Yankee player got — when a teammate or teammates didn’t think that player was giving his all.

    “When I was a young kid and you did something out of line, you might as well not go back into the dugout because there were going to be about 10 guys waiting for you,” Gossage said. “That’s why you never pulled the crap that they pull now. If you don’t run out a ground ball … I’ll tell you, money is dictating the way these managers and the front office are treating these guys. I don’t see anyone getting on anybody because they’re afraid. They’ve got so much money tied up in these guys that if they get on him, he’s going to go in the tank. It’s a disservice. It’s tough love, that’s what it’s called; that’s not happening anymore.

    “(Derek) Jeter’s the captain and I think it’s up to Jeter a lot of times to shake things up and I don’t know if they didn’t do that, maybe they did. I’m not there and I’m not hands-on, but somebody needed to put a foot up everyone’s (butt) and get them going.”

    Gossage said he was glad he got to play “the old-school way.”

    “Managers weren’t afraid to get into someone’s face,” he said. “Today, these guys (managers) tip-toe around these players because they’re making so much money. Back in the day, no one was afraid … Billy (Martin) wasn’t, George wasn’t, Thurman (Munson) wasn’t.

    “… I’ll tell you something that’s missing in the game today, there’s no one passing the torch to tell these young kids how to act. I see certain things on the Yankees, guys not wearing hats, guys pulling stuff that never would have been pulled when George was around. You acted like a Yankee. We set the tone. We were a classy organization and a classy bunch of guys and I think that’s something that’s slipping through the cracks with the Yankees and with a lot of ball clubs across the board. No one’s passing the torch.”

    But, what about HOPE WEEK!?!?

    Comments on Goose Craps On 2012 Yankees

    1. Raf
      December 2nd, 2012 | 12:50 pm

      If there were a group of players that knew how to act, it was the Yankees of the late 70′s…

      puh-leeze

    2. JeremyM
      December 2nd, 2012 | 8:31 pm

      I guess he missed the DS versus Baltimore where the Orioles were worse or the World Series where the Tigers were just as bad as the Yankees were in the ALCS. I’m not happy with how things went either but give me a break.

    3. December 2nd, 2012 | 10:21 pm

      The Goose is right. Guys, burying your heads in the sand is not the answer. There is something wrong with this team. There is a need for hard-nosed players who want to win and GM who can put that type of team together. One issue that is never mentioned here, Cashman did not want to sign Soriano, the family overruled him. There would have been no 95 wins without him.

    4. Raf
      December 2nd, 2012 | 10:55 pm

      I thought, ‘All right, what’s the worst thing that can happen here?’ And my answer was, ‘I’ll be home in Colorado tomorrow looking at the mountains.’ – Goose Gossage.

      Joseph Maloney wrote:

      One issue that is never mentioned here, Cashman did not want to sign Soriano, the family overruled him. There would have been no 95 wins without him.

      I seriously doubt that, given the number of closers that got hurt last season. The Giants and Reds made the playoffs without their primary closer. The Tigers demoted theirs in the playoffs.

      Not to mention the Yankees won 97 games last year despite Soriano sucking.

      Gossage wrote:

      We were a classy organization and a classy bunch of guys…

      Gossage must have a different definition of classy than is normally accepted.

    5. redbug
      December 3rd, 2012 | 7:29 am

      One thing he’s right about (not that they all did in his time either) is run out ground balls. Only one who consistently does it is Jeter. I think it was Cano who cost us a run last fall. What’s so damn hard about it??

    6. MJ Recanati
      December 3rd, 2012 | 11:18 am

      Goose runs his mouth because he knows that, if he’s not talking, no one is thinking about him. It’s common among ex-jocks to bloviate endlessly just so they still feel relevant. Curt Schilling is the same way (and just wait until he ages another 20 years and folks don’t remember his playing days, he’ll never shut up).

      Goose can talk because it’s a free country. Fortunately, because it’s a free country, we can choose to ignore him.

    7. McMillan
      December 3rd, 2012 | 1:22 pm

      Joseph Maloney wrote:

      One issue that is never mentioned here, Cashman did not want to sign Soriano, the family overruled him. There would have been no 95 wins without him.

      “I’ve lost my starting catcher and I’m at least down an everyday outfielder… Santa’s pushing me to deliver another quality, championship-caliber run;” “I’,” “my,” and “me -” but when the team is less-than-successful, it is because of the Steinbrenners’ interference, the responsibility of a player(s), such as Rodriguez, or the result of a case of “Yankees Flu” afflicting the teams bats. Was it Brian Cashman that said, “I was against the Soriano signing before I was for it?” I thought it was John Kerry.

    8. McMillan
      December 3rd, 2012 | 1:36 pm

      Raf wrote:

      I seriously doubt that, given the number of closers that got hurt last season. The Giants and Reds made the playoffs without their primary closer. The Tigers demoted theirs in the playoffs.

      Its a shame Soriano remained on the roster in 2012. Had he not, the team almost certainly would have gotten better results in the innings Soriano pitched than the results that came with his 2 – 1 record, 2.26 E.R.A., 69-S.O.s-in-67-I.P., 42-save performance last year. And with those better results could only have come more wins.

    9. McMillan
      December 3rd, 2012 | 1:43 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Goose runs his mouth because he knows that, if he’s not talking, no one is thinking about him. It’s common among ex-jocks to bloviate endlessly just so they still feel relevant.

      Yes. Richard Michael Gossage is retired at a young age and living in one of the most affluent and scenic areas of the country, and he not sleeping at night because of thoughts that no one on WasWatching.com is thinking about him, and that he is no longer relevant with those people.

    10. McMillan
      December 3rd, 2012 | 1:51 pm

      Raf wrote:

      Gossage must have a different definition of classy than is normally accepted.

      I think his definition of classy includes having given 100% of yourself to your profession and when you deposit your paycheck, and gratitude.

    11. Ricketson
      December 3rd, 2012 | 2:38 pm

      @ McMillan:

      “That’s why you never pulled the crap that they pull now. If you don’t run out a ground ball …” Or if you didn’t give 100% on a ball hit into right field in Fenway Park, you had Martin to answer to in the dugout immediately – Paul Blair came out to replace you before the inning even ended – and even if you’re name was Reggie Jackson. Martin had his flaws, and in looking at the replay, I wouldn’t say that Jackson “loped” on the play. But as Gossage said, he’s “old school.” And he’s a good guy that still has a love for the game. He sounds more and more like an Old-Timer; God bless him.

    12. McMillan
      December 3rd, 2012 | 2:40 pm

      @ Ricketson:

      I would be interesting to watch Robinson Cano play for Martin.

    13. LMJ229
      December 3rd, 2012 | 4:51 pm

      Raf wrote:

      If there were a group of players that knew how to act, it was the Yankees of the late 70′s…
      puh-leeze

      Yeah but they knew how to win.

    14. Raf
      December 3rd, 2012 | 7:02 pm

      LMJ229 wrote:

      Yeah but they knew how to win.

      Only in 1977 & 1978. They suffered amnesia in 1976 & from 1979-81 :P

    15. Raf
      December 3rd, 2012 | 7:03 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      I think his definition of classy includes having given 100% of yourself to your profession and when you deposit your paycheck, and gratitude.

      Describes Mickey Rivers to a tee ;)

    16. Evan3457
      December 3rd, 2012 | 7:40 pm

      Old Ballplayers Never Die.

    17. Evan3457
      December 3rd, 2012 | 7:41 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      Joseph Maloney wrote:
      One issue that is never mentioned here, Cashman did not want to sign Soriano, the family overruled him. There would have been no 95 wins without him.
      “I’ve lost my starting catcher and I’m at least down an everyday outfielder… Santa’s pushing me to deliver another quality, championship-caliber run;” “I’,” “my,” and “me -” but when the team is less-than-successful, it is because of the Steinbrenners’ interference, the responsibility of a player(s), such as Rodriguez, or the result of a case of “Yankees Flu” afflicting the teams bats. Was it Brian Cashman that said, “I was against the Soriano signing before I was for it?” I thought it was John Kerry.

      I don’t believe I’ve ever heard Cashman say any of that himself.

    18. Evan3457
      December 3rd, 2012 | 7:42 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      Raf wrote:
      I seriously doubt that, given the number of closers that got hurt last season. The Giants and Reds made the playoffs without their primary closer. The Tigers demoted theirs in the playoffs.
      Its a shame Soriano remained on the roster in 2012. Had he not, the team almost certainly would have gotten better results in the innings Soriano pitched than the results that came with his 2 – 1 record, 2.26 E.R.A., 69-S.O.s-in-67-I.P., 42-save performance last year. And with those better results could only have come more wins.

      Soriano had a big year, no doubt.
      No doubt the $10 million plus spent on using a 2nd closer in the 7th inning, largely ineffectively, in 2011, could’ve been used better in helping that team. That’s one year in Levine’s favor, and one in Cashman’s favor.

    19. Evan3457
      December 3rd, 2012 | 7:44 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      Raf wrote:
      Gossage must have a different definition of classy than is normally accepted.
      I think his definition of classy includes having given 100% of yourself to your profession and when you deposit your paycheck, and gratitude.

      Well, that’s a good definition of “professional” and “team player”. It’s possible to be both of those things, and still not be “classy”.

    20. McMillan
      December 3rd, 2012 | 8:03 pm

      Raf wrote:

      McMillan wrote:
      I think his definition of classy includes having given 100% of yourself to your profession and when you deposit your paycheck, and gratitude.
      Describes Mickey Rivers to a tee

      “Ain’t no sense worrying: If you have no control over something, ain’t no sense worrying about it -you have no control over it anyway. If you do have control, why worry? So either way, there ain’t no sense worrying.”
      -Mickey Rivers

      “Pitching is 80% of the game and the other half is hitting and fielding”
      -Mickey Rivers

      “We’ll do all right if we can capitalize on our mistakes.”
      -Mickey Rivers

      “My goals are to hit .300, score 100 runs, and stay injury-prone.”
      -Mickey Rivers

      “I’m going to double my limit.”
      -Mickey Rivers’ response to a 1975 interview question asking him how many bases he was going to steal that season.

      “That felt good. I hadn’t hit off a lefty in two months.”
      -Mickey Rivers’ post game comment after hitting a double off of Boston Red Sox right handed pitcher Bob Stanley

      “Me and George and Billy are two of a kind.”
      -Mickey Rivers, on his relationship with George Steinbrenner and Billy Martin

      “No wonder you’re all mixed up. You got a white man’s first name, a Spanish man’s second name and a black man’s third name.”
      -Mickey made this comment to Reginald Martinez Jackson in July of 1977

      “Out of what, a thousand?”
      Mickey Rivers, responding to teammate Reggie Jackson’s claim he had an IQ of 160

      “You’d better stop readin’ and writin’ and start hittin’! ”
      -Mickey Rivers’ quip back at Reggie Jackson when Jackson told Rivers, in front of reporters, that he should learn how to read and write

      What was the name of that dog on ‘Rin Tin Tin?’”
      -Mickey Rivers

      “I felt alone out there, like I was on a desert island. I felt like Gilligan.”
      -Mickey Rivers’ response to playing left field for the first time

      “The wind was blowin’ about 100 degrees”
      -Mickey Rivers’ response to the wind in the outfield at Chicago’s Comiskey Park

      “He’s so ugly. He made fly balls curve foul.”
      -Mickey Rivers on former Major Leaguer Danny Napoleon’s looks

    21. McMillan
      December 3rd, 2012 | 8:16 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      I don’t believe I’ve ever heard Cashman say any of that himself.

      “Cashman… was clueless as to how the team completely collapsed offensively in the playoffs, getting unceremoniously swept in 4 games by the Detroit Tigers in the ALCS. He expressed confusion as to how a team that earned the top record in the A.L. could only muster six runs in the series…

      “You could take snapshots at any time during the regular season and we had I think 2 or 3 four-game losing streaks during the regular season. We had what I’ve been calling ‘the Yankee flu’ that spread through our offense.”

      Rodriguez hit .273 vs. Min. in ’10, .190 vs. Tex. in ’10, .111 vs. Det. in ’11, .125 vs. Bal. in ’12, and .111 vs. Det. in ’12. Martin hit .176 vs. Det. in 2011, .176 vs. Bal. in ’12, and .143 vs. Det. in ’12;
      in 9 playoff series, Teixeira has hit higher than .200 only 3 times, and .222 overall (under contract to age 37); in 11 playoff series, Swisher has hit higher than .250 only 2 times, and .169 in overall. He is one of the worst hitters in postseason history statistically. Granderson hit .232 for the season and struck out a club-record 195 times.

    22. McMillan
      December 3rd, 2012 | 8:23 pm

      Raf wrote:

      LMJ229 wrote:
      Yeah but they knew how to win.
      Only in 1977 & 1978. They suffered amnesia in 1976 & from 1979-81

      A world championship in 1977 and 1978 was winning, but A.L. Pennants in 1976 and 81, and an A.L. East crown in 1981, was not? What happened to “making it to the playoffs is what counts?”

    23. McMillan
      December 3rd, 2012 | 9:30 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      No doubt the $10 million plus spent on using a 2nd closer in the 7th inning, largely ineffectively, in 2011, could’ve been used better in helping that team. That’s one year in Levine’s favor, and one in Cashman’s favor.

      “Levine said that the club is running a ‘$5 billion’ business and the team has a ‘sacred obligation’ to its fans. He, like Cashman, played down any potential rift in the organization.”

      The G.M. assumed the title of G.M. in 1998, but he can not be judged by his record before 2005. The G.M. was against the Rodriguez signing, but the team signed Rodriguez anyway, and the team wins its only world championship in a decade with Rodriguez’s offense. The G.M. was against the Soriano signing, but the team signed Soriano anyway and Soriano put up a 2-1 record, 2.26 E.R.A., 42 saves, and the team makes it to the postseason with it H.O.F. closer sidelined by 2 games over Bal.. Steinbrenner moves, Levine moves, Cashman moves… What is the record other than playoff appearances in 7 of 8 seasons with payrolls exceeding the no. 2 teams by tens-of-millions of dollars each year that makes Cashman a good G.M.?

      2012: $209,792,900
      2011: $207,047,964
      2010: $213,359,389
      2009: $201,449,189
      2008: $209,081,577
      2007: $189,639,045
      2006: $194,663,079
      2005: $208,306,817

    24. Raf
      December 3rd, 2012 | 9:35 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      Raf wrote:
      LMJ229 wrote:
      Yeah but they knew how to win.
      Only in 1977 & 1978. They suffered amnesia in 1976 & from 1979-81
      A world championship in 1977 and 1978 was winning, but A.L. Pennants in 1976 and 81, and an A.L. East crown in 1981, was not? What happened to “making it to the playoffs is what counts?”

      Don’t ask me, ask LMJ229 & Goose Gossage. :P

    25. Evan3457
      December 4th, 2012 | 2:00 am

      McMillan wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      I don’t believe I’ve ever heard Cashman say any of that himself.
      “Cashman… was clueless as to how the team completely collapsed offensively in the playoffs, getting unceremoniously swept in 4 games by the Detroit Tigers in the ALCS. He expressed confusion as to how a team that earned the top record in the A.L. could only muster six runs in the series…
      “You could take snapshots at any time during the regular season and we had I think 2 or 3 four-game losing streaks during the regular season. We had what I’ve been calling ‘the Yankee flu’ that spread through our offense.”
      Rodriguez hit .273 vs. Min. in ’10, .190 vs. Tex. in ’10, .111 vs. Det. in ’11, .125 vs. Bal. in ’12, and .111 vs. Det. in ’12. Martin hit .176 vs. Det. in 2011, .176 vs. Bal. in ’12, and .143 vs. Det. in ’12;
      in 9 playoff series, Teixeira has hit higher than .200 only 3 times, and .222 overall (under contract to age 37); in 11 playoff series, Swisher has hit higher than .250 only 2 times, and .169 in overall. He is one of the worst hitters in postseason history statistically. Granderson hit .232 for the season and struck out a club-record 195 times.

      None of which addresses what I said.

    26. Evan3457
      December 4th, 2012 | 2:01 am

      McMillan wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      No doubt the $10 million plus spent on using a 2nd closer in the 7th inning, largely ineffectively, in 2011, could’ve been used better in helping that team. That’s one year in Levine’s favor, and one in Cashman’s favor.
      “Levine said that the club is running a ‘$5 billion’ business and the team has a ‘sacred obligation’ to its fans. He, like Cashman, played down any potential rift in the organization.”
      The G.M. assumed the title of G.M. in 1998, but he can not be judged by his record before 2005. The G.M. was against the Rodriguez signing, but the team signed Rodriguez anyway, and the team wins its only world championship in a decade with Rodriguez’s offense. The G.M. was against the Soriano signing, but the team signed Soriano anyway and Soriano put up a 2-1 record, 2.26 E.R.A., 42 saves, and the team makes it to the postseason with it H.O.F. closer sidelined by 2 games over Bal.. Steinbrenner moves, Levine moves, Cashman moves… What is the record other than playoff appearances in 7 of 8 seasons with payrolls exceeding the no. 2 teams by tens-of-millions of dollars each year that makes Cashman a good G.M.?
      2012: $209,792,900
      2011: $207,047,964
      2010: $213,359,389
      2009: $201,449,189
      2008: $209,081,577
      2007: $189,639,045
      2006: $194,663,079
      2005: $208,306,817

      Which, again, doesn’t really address what I said about the Soriano signing.

      2012 looks good for Levine, bad for Cashman.
      2011 is the other way around.

    27. McMillan
      December 4th, 2012 | 12:57 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Which, again, doesn’t really address what I said about the Soriano signing.

      Cashman is the G.M., not Levine.

      What is Cashman’s record that indicates he is one of the better G.M.’s in baseball, and not one of the lesser ones, other than the playoff appearances in 7 of 8 seasons?

      Signing one of the best left-handed starters in baseball to a $161 mil. contract? No less than five of the worst contract signings in franchise history have come with Cashman as G.M.

      What is Cashman’s record that indicates he is one of the better G.M.’s in baseball, and not one of the lesser ones, other than the playoff appearances in 7 of 8 seasons? Levine is the president, he is not the G.M.

    28. McMillan
      December 4th, 2012 | 12:58 pm

      Raf wrote:

      Don’t ask me, ask LMJ229 & Goose Gossage.

      Got it.

    29. McMillan
      December 4th, 2012 | 1:07 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Well, that’s a good definition of “professional” and “team player”. It’s possible to be both of those things, and still not be “classy”.

      This makes no sense. But I don’t understand why any fan of the franchise would have a problem with Gossage or most of the people associated with the great teams of the 1970s either – so there was not a perfect human being amongst them. Are you one?

    30. McMillan
      December 5th, 2012 | 8:55 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      None of which addresses what I said.

      McMillan wrote:

      What is Cashman’s record that indicates he is one of the better G.M.’s in baseball, and not one of the lesser ones, other than the playoff appearances in 7 of 8 seasons?

      Apparently there is none.

    31. Evan3457
      December 5th, 2012 | 9:25 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      Which, again, doesn’t really address what I said about the Soriano signing.
      Cashman is the G.M., not Levine.
      What is Cashman’s record that indicates he is one of the better G.M.’s in baseball, and not one of the lesser ones, other than the playoff appearances in 7 of 8 seasons?
      Signing one of the best left-handed starters in baseball to a $161 mil. contract? No less than five of the worst contract signings in franchise history have come with Cashman as G.M.
      What is Cashman’s record that indicates he is one of the better G.M.’s in baseball, and not one of the lesser ones, other than the playoff appearances in 7 of 8 seasons? Levine is the president, he is not the G.M.

      I’m not arguing how good or bad Cashman is. You’re citing 2012 as evidence he’s awful. If you’re going to do that, then fairness demands you also acknowledge Soriano’s 2011 does as much to prove he was correct.

    32. Evan3457
      December 5th, 2012 | 9:28 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      Well, that’s a good definition of “professional” and “team player”. It’s possible to be both of those things, and still not be “classy”.
      This makes no sense. But I don’t understand why any fan of the franchise would have a problem with Gossage or most of the people associated with the great teams of the 1970s either – so there was not a perfect human being amongst them. Are you one?

      I don’t have a problem with them, and my only problem with Goose is that like a great many old ballplayers, they forget how hard the game is the moment they retire, and when they speak on the subject publicly, have nothing but disdain for most contemporary players. This has been going on almost as long as professional baseball has been played.

      Maybe it’s nothing to heavily criticize Gossage for, but it’s nothing to praise him for, either.

    33. Evan3457
      December 5th, 2012 | 9:28 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      None of which addresses what I said.
      McMillan wrote:
      What is Cashman’s record that indicates he is one of the better G.M.’s in baseball, and not one of the lesser ones, other than the playoff appearances in 7 of 8 seasons?
      Apparently there is none.

      In your opinion.

    34. Raf
      December 5th, 2012 | 9:34 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      I don’t have a problem with them, and my only problem with Goose is that like a great many old ballplayers, they forget how hard the game is the moment they retire, and when they speak on the subject publicly, have nothing but disdain for most contemporary players.

      I find it funny that Goose is chastising players now for having the same attitudes they had back then. Mickey Rivers always came to play? The Yankees of the late 70′s were a classy harmonious bunch? Reggie Jackson never watched his home runs? Riiiiiiiiiiiight! :)

    35. McMillan
      December 5th, 2012 | 10:42 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      You’re citing 2012 as evidence he’s awful.

      I am citing 1998-2012, and I have not said that he is an awful G.M., just that he is not a good G.M.

      Evan3457 wrote:

      This has been going on almost as long as professional baseball has been played.

      Agreed. And Gossage has always been a good guy, and a lot of people made the same observations.

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