• A-Rod: Hip, Hip, Not Hooray…

    Posted by on December 3rd, 2012 · Comments (40)

    Via Bryan Hoch -

    The Yankees are concerned that Alex Rodriguez’s surgically repaired right hip may be damaged, according to a report in Monday’s New York Post.

    Citing a person with knowledge of the situation, the newspaper reported that Rodriguez recently visited Colorado-based specialist Dr. Marc Philippon after experiencing tightness in the hip.

    “It’s an issue,” the person told the Post. “A big issue.”

    Yankees general manager Brian Cashman mentioned Rodriguez’s hip on Sunday when speaking to reporters in Stamford, Conn., where he was participating in the city’s Heights and Lights holiday event.

    “He is always going to have hip issues to deal with. That’s just part of his winter program,” Cashman said.

    Rodriguez had hip surgery before the 2009 season and missed the first month of games, as Philippon repaired the right hip labrum, removed an impingement in the joint and drained a cyst.

    At the time, it was believed that Rodriguez would have a follow-up procedure after the ’09 season, but Philippon was so encouraged by Rodriguez’s progress as the Yankees charged to the World Series title that he said the slugger wouldn’t need the second operation.

    It is interesting to watch A-Rod turn into Juan Gonzalez before our very eyes…

    Update:  Big OUCH! for the Yankees and A-Rod.  He’s out until June of next year, maybe longer…

    Comments on A-Rod: Hip, Hip, Not Hooray…

    1. KPOcala
      December 3rd, 2012 | 11:53 am

      I wonder if A-Rod’s hip turns into an advantage. I don’t about the insurance coverage, but something like this could send him into retirement.
      Which just “MAY” be why Cashman is so coy about his plans. Think about guys like Britt Burns, Albert Belle, and Bo Jackson. When the hip is done, it’s cooked, and nothing brings it back. The Yanks could be waiting on the insurance people to make a pronouncement. Just speculatin’………

    2. KPOcala
      December 3rd, 2012 | 11:55 am

      Update: A-Rod to have surgery, will miss part of the season….

    3. December 3rd, 2012 | 12:42 pm

      Amazing to think the Yankees still owe this guy $114 million!

    4. December 3rd, 2012 | 12:52 pm

      Also, now, when does A-Rod get his 3,000th hit, in 2014?

    5. K-V-C
      December 3rd, 2012 | 12:58 pm

      Guess this explains why Cashman keeps saying he needs to shre up the infield. Just fu!!ing cut ties with A-Roid already.

    6. Raf
      December 3rd, 2012 | 1:32 pm

      Didn’t they gamble on the original surgery holding up? IIRC, they had the option to really shore everything up, but they didn’t for whatever reason (I think it was to get him back on the field quicker). So much for that.

    7. December 3rd, 2012 | 1:35 pm

      @ Raf:
      Different hip this time

    8. December 3rd, 2012 | 1:39 pm

      Mark my words: The Yankees will NEVER get more than 130 games out of A-Rod in any given season from this point forward.

    9. EHawk
      December 3rd, 2012 | 2:03 pm

      Last time Arod missed 2 months with this same injury…why now will he miss 6 months…also why are they waiting until January to do the surgery…why not do it right away?? Something doesn’t add up here.

    10. December 3rd, 2012 | 2:12 pm

      Supposedly, A-Rod wants to try and strengthen the area before the surgery.

    11. December 3rd, 2012 | 2:12 pm

      I just want to know how A-Rod is going to recover this time without the aid of Dr. Feelgood from Canada.

    12. Ricketson
      December 3rd, 2012 | 2:14 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      Supposedly, A-Rod wants to try and strengthen the area before the surgery.

      The hip has to be strengthened before surgery.

    13. EHawk
      December 3rd, 2012 | 2:18 pm

      @ Ricketson:
      Still it doesn’t explain why now it will take him 3 times longer to recover?

    14. Ricketson
      December 3rd, 2012 | 2:23 pm

      @ EHawk:

      I believe as Steve pointed out earlier, it is a different hip and different injury. I also agree with Steve in that if it wasn’t this, it would have been something else – he can not be counted on for more than 130 games each year for the duration of his contract.

    15. redbug
      December 3rd, 2012 | 2:27 pm

      IF the Yanks ever get 130 games from him, I’d be shocked.

    16. Ricketson
      December 3rd, 2012 | 2:49 pm

      redbug wrote:

      IF the Yanks ever get 130 games from him, I’d be shocked.

      1 more season maybe, and 2 or 3 at most.

    17. December 3rd, 2012 | 3:21 pm

      It will be interesting to see the reaction of the fans, media, team and front office if A-Rod comes back next season and hits .260 with no power.

    18. Ricketson
      December 3rd, 2012 | 3:44 pm

      @ Ricketson:

      Whether or not it turns out to be true that he had been playing with an injury in the postseason in 2012 and did not use this as an excuse for his poor performance or in response to all of the negative publicity and treatment that he received, there can be no reaction to any player coming back from this type of surgery at the age of 38 and not hitting… What was he supposed to do? Decline the money the team offered him in the final years of his contract?

    19. McMillan
      December 3rd, 2012 | 4:04 pm

      @ Ricketson:

      “The biggest question… is how, if Rodriguez was as injured as they now say he is back in the playoffs, no one affiliated with the Yankees said anything. Instead, Rodriguez was allowed to dangle like a pinata all Oct., with everyone taking a whack.”

      http://hardballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/12/03/brian-cashman-is-going-to-give-a-rods-eulogy-at-230pm-eastern/

    20. December 3rd, 2012 | 4:10 pm

      Anyone else wonder how things would be different if the MLBPA has allowed A-Rod to go to Boston and/or if Aaron Boone didn’t like to play basketball?

    21. MJ Recanati
      December 3rd, 2012 | 5:11 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      It will be interesting to see the reaction of the fans, media, team and front office if A-Rod comes back next season and hits .260 with no power.

      You’ve been asking this question, or some form of it, for quite some time now. The answer is always the same:

      If Rodriguez was despised by a large segment of the fans (and by the entirety of the New York media) while he was winning MVP’s and was performing at an elite level from 2004-2008 then he’s already seen what it’ll be like for him when he’s not performing. To be hated when you’re at your best should prepare you quite well for being hated when you’re at your worst.

    22. MJ Recanati
      December 3rd, 2012 | 5:12 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      Anyone else wonder how things would be different if the MLBPA has allowed A-Rod to go to Boston and/or if Aaron Boone didn’t like to play basketball?

      Nope. The Yankees were lucky to get Rodriguez when they did. Aaron Boone sucked and we should be thankful that he was pushed out by the far better player.

    23. Garcia
      December 3rd, 2012 | 6:13 pm

      At least all the talk of Jeter’s BMI are not cause for Yankee fans to worry.
      http://blogs.thescore.com/mlb/2012/12/03/fat-jeter-we-hardly-knew-ye/

      BTW, I feel bad for ARod…but I don’t feel bad for the Yanks. Strange. They put themselves in this position, a lot of things can be blamed on ARod – our planet’s warming is one thing I solely put on ARod’s shoulder, all his fault – but him signing a ridiculous contract is not his fault. The Yanks had this coming. The chicken is definitely coming home to roost. Suck it Hank! Suck it Randy!

    24. Raf
      December 3rd, 2012 | 6:55 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      @ Raf:
      Different hip this time

      Thx!

      Ricketson wrote:

      I also agree with Steve in that if it wasn’t this, it would have been something else

      Like a broken wrist?

      Steve L. wrote:

      It will be interesting to see the reaction of the fans, media, team and front office if A-Rod comes back next season and hits .260 with no power.

      Rodriguez has been here since the 2004 season. We know what we’re going to get WRT fan reaction.

      Steve L. wrote:

      Anyone else wonder how things would be different if the MLBPA has allowed A-Rod to go to Boston and/or if Aaron Boone didn’t like to play basketball?

      Not really, though it would’ve been interesting to see Sheffield play 3b, as he volunteered. IIRC, they were looking to go with Mike Lamb and Tyler Houston (?) before the Rodriguez deal went through.

    25. KPOcala
      December 3rd, 2012 | 7:33 pm

      If any of you guys have been around someone immediately following hip surgery you understand that anything could happen from here going forward. As I wrote above, hips are not like other parts of the body, and sometimes athletes never come back. For example, if this hip pain, which seems to have been going on for some time now, turns out to be “avascular necrosis”, aka, “Bo Jackson’s Injury”…Sayonara. He’ll be looking forward to a hip replacement. Hopefully that’s not the case, but the probability is >0…

    26. Evan3457
      December 3rd, 2012 | 7:48 pm

      Well, at least there’s a possible cause of his suckitude in the playoffs, which is somewhat better than no cause except loss of bat speed, for which no surgery will suffice.

    27. December 3rd, 2012 | 8:49 pm

      The amazing thing is, if you heard the Cashman presser today, is that A-Rod complained of an issue with his RIGHT hip when Girardi PH for him in the ALDS. And, the Yankees had it checked, MRI, and it was fine. So, then, A-Rod sees his Colorado doctor and the RIGHT hip is checked, and it’s still fine. But, the doctor checks the other hip, the LEFT one, and then sees a tear in there – but, again, A-Rod never, ever, complained of an issue with his LEFT hip.

      This makes me think of all those old ballplayers who said they were better off before all the tools that are available today – because they never knew what was wrong with them, they just went out and played.

      I mean, really, no discomfort, no pain…

      …and, yet, now, he needs to have it operated on.

      It almost sounds like this is an elective procedure.

    28. Garcia
      December 3rd, 2012 | 8:52 pm

      @ Steve L.:
      Didn’t think of it that way, I think you’re on to something. Makes sense to me.

    29. December 3rd, 2012 | 9:13 pm

      It’s paint by the numbers time. This is a 37 year old player facing major surgery. His time at third is basically done. Maybe he can play in the field once or twice a week but as of now the Yankees going forward have no third baseman. What they have is a declining player who might be able to DH assuming he can hit (and that is an assumption). When a team gets old stuff like this happens.

    30. Raf
      December 3rd, 2012 | 9:41 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      The amazing thing is, if you heard the Cashman presser today, is that A-Rod complained of an issue with his RIGHT hip when Girardi PH for him in the ALDS. And, the Yankees had it checked, MRI, and it was fine. So, then, A-Rod sees his Colorado doctor and the RIGHT hip is checked, and it’s still fine. But, the doctor checks the other hip, the LEFT one, and then sees a tear in there – but, again, A-Rod never, ever, complained of an issue with his LEFT hip.

      It’s possible that something could’ve happened between then and now. It could be any number of things.

    31. EHawk
      December 3rd, 2012 | 10:38 pm

      Maybe he hurt it when he was Hanging and Banging with Torrie Wilson this offseason!

    32. KPOcala
      December 4th, 2012 | 12:14 am

      @ Steve L.:
      I once had a physical therapist, with a PhD tell me that he wouldn’t want to look at his MRI, that it would basically get into his head. Saying that, however, my wife, in her early forties, started having hip/groin pain. Three years different specialists in different fields couldn’t figure it out. Next thing you know, her hip, near the socket had a stress fracture, leading to surgery. During surgery the femur went into a spiral fracture leaving her with a 14 inch titanium rod in her leg. I’ve talked to enough physicians and surgeons to learn that when hip issues crop up, all bets are off. Everything about the A-Rod news, including Cashman’s slow movements in the market so far, are, IMHO, ominous. Just a perspective, and a gut feeling…….

    33. KPOcala
      December 4th, 2012 | 12:22 am

      From Chad Jennings LoHud blog, “Ken Rosenthal reports that Rodriguez’s pain was so severe in the postseason that he spent a night in the hospital. It’s worth noting that Rodriguez and Joe Girardi were asked many, many times about Rodriguez’s health in the postseason and they always said he was fine.”

      Well, that would explain why he moved and swung the way he did. I hope to hell that his hip hasn’t gone into the “avascular necrosis” thing. Career ending, and I would think that the Yanks have at least part of that contract insured. I wonder (this speculation is in very poor taste, I understand) if the Yankees would get salary cap relief? A-Rod hasn’t been one of my favorites over the years, but I’d hate to see him go out like this……….

    34. December 4th, 2012 | 2:29 pm

      Is anyone else perturbed at the way Cashman has handled this entire situation?

      McMillan’s link speaks to what I feel is a flaw in how Cashman handled things: “Classic Cashman: asked about why this is just coming up now, he said “no one asked me a specific question about his hip.” Rather, he said, he was asked if A-Rod would be used as a DH, or if he was going to start or what.

      So you’re going to dangle A-Rod to be hit repeatedly by the media and fans to cover up an injury? I don’t know about you, but an ER visit, regardless of misdiagnosis (I’d assume you check both sides of the hip, even if there’s an issue on one, right?), implies pain that won’t go away after an off-day, correct? I mean, Cashman used A-Rod to the fullest extent, allowing his mistakes as well as Granderson, Cano, and Swisher go almost scot-free in the aftermath of the Tigers sweep.

      A-Rod has played through injuries in the past and the dude played through a practical tear in one of his hips from late September on. Baseball players do this all the time: Jeter with his ankle and Pineda with his arms being recent examples. It’s up to management to make that decision, to see how a player responds to playing, to see if they are “all arms, no legs”, and to take action and honest action at that.

      I’ve been a Cashman supporter for the most part, but his treatment of players has only grown to being something more ominous than just things being “strictly business”. Trying to blame the media for “not asking the right questions”? Please. You knew there was an injury, you knew A-Rod went to the ER, you know there was an issue, and yet, you use him to cover your own ass. Give me a break.

      I understand Cashman didn’t sign A-Rod, but I wonder if there is more tension between him and the rest of the higher ups. We shall see. This isn’t over.

    35. KPOcala
      December 4th, 2012 | 5:24 pm

      @ Brent:
      Brent, I think your mostly right. The checking of both hips would not be routine, however (although considering the money these guys make, the team is being penny-wise and pound foolish). Another point, Cashman can’t let his rivals know what’s going on with his player’s health. Doing so allows the other GM’s to come in like sharks smelling blood. I.E., while it may be cold, Cashman’s first duty is to the club, playing his cards close to the chest. And if I’m being paid, as a player, I keep my mouth shut, suck it up, knowing that the truth will usually come out in the wash….As I wrote above, I’ve (or rather my wife) went through some very serious hip issues. I can’t believe that the Experts wouldn’t have given the entire pelvic girdle a thorough going over to find the source of pain that would send an athlete to the hospital. IMHO, it’s indefensible incompetency of the team’s medical staff, bordering on malpractice…….

    36. MJ Recanati
      December 4th, 2012 | 6:23 pm

      KPOcala wrote:

      IMHO, it’s indefensible incompetency of the team’s medical staff, bordering on malpractice…

      I’ve come to accept that a team’s medical staff rarely has the player’s best interest at heart. Just look over at the NFL, where players get their brains scrambled like eggs and still get doctors to sign off sending them back out there. Similarly, team doctors will give a player all the meds he can handle, even if a responsible physician would never overprescribe medication.

    37. December 4th, 2012 | 6:54 pm

      KPOcala wrote:

      IMHO, it’s indefensible incompetency of the team’s medical staff, bordering on malpractice…….

      Great points. Let’s just say that I won’t be going to New York Presbyterian Hospital for hip check-ups in the next 20-40 years (I’m assuming NYPH because it’s the ‘official hospital of the New York Yankees’ and it’s pretty darn close to the Stadium).

    38. KPOcala
      December 4th, 2012 | 7:15 pm

      @ MJ Recanati: Absolutely. They’d give the player cobra venom if it would kill the pain for a few hours……

    39. McMillan
      December 4th, 2012 | 7:15 pm

      KPOcala wrote:

      Cashman’s first duty is to the club, playing his cards close to the chest.

      He could have both: 1. satisfied his duties and responsibilities to the club; and 2. made a public statement of some kind in support of Rodriguez in the wake of all of the criticism and negative publicity that was directed at Rodriguez personally after the Det. playoff loss in 2012; criticism that was more appropriately directed at the G.M. that put together the worst-hitting lineup in playoff history (.188) – Brian Cashman. But, not surprisingly, he did not make such as statement, even when he had knowledge that his player had been injured.

    40. McMillan
      December 5th, 2012 | 12:40 pm

      “Do I wonder whether it is?” Cashman repeated when asked about the possibility of steroid use contributing to the second hip operation on the team’s third baseman in four years. “It doesn’t matter what I wonder.” That’s how you support your players as a G.M.; and one that helped win a world championship for you in 2009, and helped get you and your ex-wife a contract extension in 2011.

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