• Ballplayers Dream: To Live & Play In Las Vegas

    Posted by on December 31st, 2012 · Comments (0)

    There’s only a 6.6 % total tax that state residents in Nevada pay as a percentage of per capita income…

    More on the whole state tax issue for baseball players via the AP last month -

    With baseball contracts worth as much as $275 million (Alex Rodriguez) and the major league minimum $480,000, tax policy affects every player who spends most of the season in the big leagues.

    All-Star shortstop Jose Reyes, who has a $10 million salary next year, was traded from the Miami Marlins to the Toronto Blue Jays. While Florida has no state income tax, Reyes remains a New York resident from his days with the Mets and had high taxes to begin with. Ontario’s provincial tax rises to 11.16 percent — on top of a Canadian federal level as high as 29 percent.

    Among states with big league teams, income tax rates go as high as 10.3 percent in California and 8.82 percent in New York. At the other end, Florida, Texas and Washington have no state income tax. The top rate in the District of Columbia is 8.95 percent.

    “I like ours; we’re a no-tax state,” Seattle Mariners general manager Jack Zdurienck said. “When we sit down with players, that’s a huge benefit. I think any player out there that has an opportunity to play in a no-tax state gets benefits, enormous benefits. We hope that weighs in our favor.”

    According to an analysis done by a tax lawyer on the staff of agent Scott Boras, a player with a $10 million salary and average deductions who plays in Florida and is a resident of that state will see his taxes rise from $3.45 million this year to $4.09 million next year under current law. If traded to the Blue Jays, that player’s 2013 tax would rise to $4.27 million. And if dealt to a California team, the tax would go up to $4.4 million.

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