• Stan The Man – How Great He Was…

    Posted by on January 19th, 2013 · Comments (9)

    Stan Musial passed away.

    When he retired from the game, he was the second greatest player in National League history (at that time).  And, he was a tick away from being the best.

    Spanning Multiple Seasons or entire Careers, Playing in the NL, From 1901 to 1963, sorted by greatest WAR Position Players

    Rk Player WAR/pos From To Age G PA R H HR RBI BB BA OBP SLG
    1 Rogers Hornsby 124.0 1915 1933 19-37 2192 9343 1566 2895 298 1555 1018 .359 .434 .578
    2 Stan Musial 123.4 1941 1963 20-42 3026 12717 1949 3630 475 1951 1599 .331 .417 .559
    3 Honus Wagner 110.0 1901 1917 27-43 2298 9640 1414 2766 78 1375 836 .325 .392 .462
    4 Mel Ott 104.0 1926 1947 17-38 2730 11348 1859 2876 511 1860 1708 .304 .414 .533
    5 Willie Mays 94.5 1951 1963 20-32 1691 7337 1258 2033 406 1179 791 .315 .389 .588
    6 Eddie Mathews 78.4 1952 1963 20-31 1792 7799 1220 1834 422 1166 1155 .280 .387 .535
    7 Hank Aaron 70.6 1954 1963 20-29 1511 6582 1077 1898 342 1121 541 .320 .375 .572
    8 Arky Vaughan 70.5 1932 1948 20-36 1817 7722 1173 2103 96 926 937 .318 .406 .453
    9 Paul Waner 69.8 1926 1944 23-41 2540 10756 1626 3151 113 1308 1088 .333 .404 .474
    10 Frankie Frisch 68.0 1919 1937 20-38 2311 10099 1532 2880 105 1244 728 .316 .369 .432
    11 Johnny Mize 64.4 1936 1949 23-36 1508 6396 1019 1781 315 1158 764 .320 .405 .577
    12 Duke Snider 63.8 1947 1963 20-36 2052 8048 1243 2081 403 1316 949 .298 .382 .545
    13 Pee Wee Reese 63.1 1940 1958 21-39 2166 9470 1338 2170 126 885 1210 .269 .366 .377
    14 Richie Ashburn 60.2 1948 1962 21-35 2189 9736 1322 2574 29 586 1198 .308 .396 .382
    15 Jackie Robinson 58.7 1947 1956 28-37 1382 5804 947 1518 137 734 740 .311 .409 .474
    16 Zack Wheat 56.5 1909 1926 21-38 2322 9721 1255 2804 131 1210 632 .317 .367 .452
    17 Sherry Magee 55.8 1904 1919 19-34 2087 8545 1112 2169 83 1176 736 .291 .364 .427
    18 Ernie Banks 54.4 1953 1963 22-32 1500 6346 879 1617 353 1026 521 .283 .344 .535
    19 Billy Herman 52.5 1931 1947 21-37 1922 8639 1163 2345 47 839 737 .304 .367 .407
    20 Joe Medwick 52.4 1932 1948 20-36 1984 8143 1198 2471 205 1383 437 .324 .362 .505
    21 Bill Terry 52.1 1923 1936 24-37 1720 7108 1120 2193 154 1078 537 .341 .393 .506
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 1/19/2013.

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    Comments on Stan The Man – How Great He Was…

    1. Raf
      January 19th, 2013 | 10:40 pm

      Jeez. Not a good start to 2013 for MLB.

    2. KPOcala
      January 19th, 2013 | 11:10 pm

      Amazing, playing that many years, hitting with power and average. Almost unreal. I’m thinking that only Ted Williams was in his class, having long careers, high batting averages, with boom-boom power…..

    3. Ricketson
      January 19th, 2013 | 11:34 pm

      If I had a few dollars for every time I heard Bill White say that Stan Musial was the best hitter he had ever seen as I watched Yankees games growing up…

    4. Evan3457
      January 20th, 2013 | 1:48 am

      KPOcala wrote:

      Amazing, playing that many years, hitting with power and average. Almost unreal. I’m thinking that only Ted Williams was in his class, having long careers, high batting averages, with boom-boom power…..

      Bill James comparing Musial to Williams in his first Historical Baseball Abstract:
      “If I had to choose between the two of them, I’d take Musial in left field, Musial on the base paths, Musial in the clubhouse, and Williams only with the wood in his hand. And Stan Musial could hit a little, too.”

    5. Evan3457
      January 20th, 2013 | 1:51 am

      WAR rates Hornsby as a tick better than Musial, but Hornsby was a crappy teammate and a general horse’s ass, so I’d take Musial over Hornsby any day of the week. He was the all-time MLB leader in MVP Award Shares until Barry Bonds’ needle came along.

      In my mind, Musial is the greatest player in NL history until at least the advent of Willie Mays.

    6. KPOcala
      January 20th, 2013 | 12:28 pm

      @ Evan3457: I still have that book, thanks for jogging the memory! Great book!

    7. 77yankees
      January 20th, 2013 | 3:38 pm

      Remember watching one of those Cardinal playoff games at Busch Stadium in the mid-80s on TV with my father, and someone hit a foul that bounced into the seats down the 3B line that was caught by Musial in the front row, who held it up to a loud cheer, and then tossed it 20 rows up into the crowd, and remember how Vin Scully remarked how Stan “just made someone’s day”.

      In a time where it seems mandatory to have to be hated by someone, it’s sad to see legends pass on who seemingly were hated by no one. RIP, Stan.

    8. Raf
      January 20th, 2013 | 6:06 pm

      77yankees wrote:

      In a time where it seems mandatory to have to be hated by someone, it’s sad to see legends pass on who seemingly were hated by no one. RIP, Stan.

      Excellent point.

    9. danb
      January 21st, 2013 | 1:13 am

      @ 77yankees:
      Right on, hated by no one, My Dad watched him play against our Tigers, and he always told me that Stan Musial was the greatest and nicest man he ever saw play. And I would say, “what about Hank Greenberg or Al Kaline or Charlie Gehringer or Ty Cobb” I’d always try to put a Great Tiger ahead of Stan Musial. And, my Dad is a Tiger fan all the way. And, he’s in Florida for the winter(Mi. snowbird) And, you know what, he’s absolutely right. Stan “The Man” Musial is the greatest post Babe Ruth. My father saw Greenberg, said he was great but Stan was the best, his favorite ball player. So I called him, he is in the hospital recovering from dehydration from the flu. And you know what he tells me in a very hoarse voice before I had the chance to say anything, he says Stan Musial just passed, he was tearing, I said I was tearing also and told him he was right, Stan was the Greatest. Player and Man. R.I.P. Stan Musial!

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