• DEA & MLB Investigating A-Rod Miami Based Advisor

    Posted by on January 26th, 2013 · Comments (10)

    Via the Daily News -

    The Drug Enforcement Administration and Major League Baseball are investigating a Miami-area man named Anthony Bosch — who has worked closely with Alex Rodriguez — for Bosch’s possible links to performance-enhancing drugs, sources have told the Daily News. The sources asked not to be identified because of the ongoing probe.

    Bosch, a well-known figure among current and former Latin ballplayers in South Florida, has advised the embattled Yankee superstar on nutrition, dietary supplements and training, a source familiar with Miami-area anti-aging centers told The News.

    The source said Rodriguez and Bosch consulted with at least one other expert about blood test results. Bosch, records show, has been affiliated with a number of Miami-area medical companies and clinics.

    Major League Baseball investigators have turned over information about Bosch and his father, physician Pedro Publio Bosch, to federal investigators, sources have told the Daily News. Bosch and his father had already come under scrutiny from MLB and the DEA in 2009 for their links to Manny Ramirez after the then-Dodgers slugger was suspended that year for 50 games for using a banned substance.

    The Daily News reported in June of 2009 that the DEA initiated an administrative review of Pedro Bosch because investigators suspected he wrote a prescription for the banned drug used by Ramirez, who was banned for violating MLB’s drug policy that year.

    Anthony Bosch was described by the Daily News and other media outlets in 2009 as being well-known in Latin-American circles, his relationship with players dating as far back as the early 2000s when he attended parties with players and attended games in New York and Boston.

    Sources involved in the probe have told The News that MLB and federal investigators are trying to determine if Anthony Bosch and his father are involved in supplying banned substances to ballplayers.

    Rodriguez cut ties to controversial Canadian doctor Anthony Galea not long after American and Canadian law-enforcement agencies launched investigations into the Toronto sports physician and human growth hormone proponent in 2009. That was when American authorities found HGH and other drugs in his assistant’s car as she tried to cross the border. Galea, who said he treated A-Rod with a blood-spinning technique called platelet-rich plasma therapy (PRP), was indicted on five drug-related counts in October of 2010, but the U.S. government agreed to drop four of the charges if he complied with a plea agreement and cooperated with prosecutors pursuing other investigations.

    The indictment said Galea traveled to the United States more than 100 times between 2007 and 2009 to treat more than 20 patients in their homes and in hotel rooms.

    Galea pleaded guilty in July of 2011 to transporting misbranded and unapproved drugs into the United States. He was sentenced to a year of supervised release in December of 2011.

    Calls placed to Anthony Bosch’s telephone numbers in Miami weren’t returned, nor were calls to Pedro Bosch’s Coral Gables area clinic.

    Major League Baseball declined comment, as did the Yankees. Rodriguez’s lawyer, Jay Reisinger, declined comment.

    According to sources familiar with the Miami investigation, MLB is concerned about a widespread ring of suppliers of synthetic testosterone, human growth hormone and other drugs to players who have sought to circumvent MLB’s collective drug-testing program through difficult-to-detect performance-enhancing drugs that players administer through patches or creams or gels on their palms or elbows or under their arms.

    Hmmmmm…

    Could a possible 50-game suspension TBA for A-Rod be the reason why Brian Cashman is now hinting that he may not play at all in 2013?

    Comments on DEA & MLB Investigating A-Rod Miami Based Advisor

    1. Evan3457
      January 26th, 2013 | 9:15 am

      Probably not.

      As I mentioned in the thread below, he isn’t “now hinting” anything. He said three weeks ago, and he also mentioned it as a possibility when the surgery was announced at the Winter Meetings in December:

      https://twitter.com/eboland11/status/294941031839981568

      Follow

      “Erik Boland

      ,This A-Rod story isn’t really news. From time surgery announced at winter meetings Yankees have proceeded as if missing season a possibility.

    2. January 26th, 2013 | 12:34 pm

      AROD is the Yankee version of “Peck’s Bad Boy”, it never ends.

    3. January 26th, 2013 | 12:43 pm

      I have to wonder, if there’s anything that comes out of this, like a suspension, then it puts A-Rod in the class of Manny Ramirez and Rafael Palmeiro…and, then, he faces the potential of having to wait a very long time to get into Cooperstown.

      Don’t get me wrong, I think all these guys get in, in time – like Bonds, Clemens, etc. But, it’s going to take time for the world to get their head around the fact that they used, the numbers are what they are, and you can’t leave out a whole generation of ballplayers.

    4. Evan3457
      January 26th, 2013 | 8:24 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      I have to wonder, if there’s anything that comes out of this, like a suspension, then it puts A-Rod in the class of Manny Ramirez and Rafael Palmeiro…and, then, he faces the potential of having to wait a very long time to get into Cooperstown.
      Don’t get me wrong, I think all these guys get in, in time – like Bonds, Clemens, etc. But, it’s going to take time for the world to get their head around the fact that they used, the numbers are what they are, and you can’t leave out a whole generation of ballplayers.

      As I’ve said before, if a player voted in keeps silence until after his installation, then comes out and admits using steroids, the rationale for keeping these players crumbles and the wall comes a’tumblin’ down.

    5. LMJ229
      January 26th, 2013 | 9:47 pm

      Where there’s smoke there’s fire and A-Rod’s name just keeps coming up in all of these PED investigations. He may be able to avoid a suspension and he might even be able to get into the Hall of Fame but A-Rod’s enormous ego and conceit will not allow him to stop using some form of PED. His two biggest fears are getting old and becoming inconsequential, both of which he will not be able to escape.

    6. LMJ229
      January 26th, 2013 | 9:55 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      As I’ve said before, if a player voted in keeps silence until after his installation, then comes out and admits using steroids, the rationale for keeping these players crumbles and the wall comes a’tumblin’ down.

      I’ve no doubt that there are currently some players who are in the HOF who used PEDS. Their use was so rampant and PEDS date back to at least the early 80′s. However, I doubt anyone would get voted in and then “own up”. And, if by chance that did happen, I wouldn’t put it past the Commissioner to somehow expel him.

    7. Evan3457
      January 27th, 2013 | 1:50 am

      LMJ229 wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      As I’ve said before, if a player voted in keeps silence until after his installation, then comes out and admits using steroids, the rationale for keeping these players crumbles and the wall comes a’tumblin’ down.
      I’ve no doubt that there are currently some players who are in the HOF who used PEDS. Their use was so rampant and PEDS date back to at least the early 80′s. However, I doubt anyone would get voted in and then “own up”. And, if by chance that did happen, I wouldn’t put it past the Commissioner to somehow expel him.

      The Commisioner can’t expel anyone from the Hall. The Baseball Hall of Fame is not owned by MLB. The Hall of Fame takes strong suggestion from MLB, because MLB supplies most of the memorabilia the Hall gets possession (not to mention nearly all the players in the Hall), but the Hall has never had an expulsion mechanism, and if it invents one now, the players themselves will revolt, and that’s the end of the current Hall of Fame.

    8. Raf
      January 27th, 2013 | 2:29 am

      LMJ229 wrote:

      His two biggest fears are getting old and becoming inconsequential, both of which he will not be able to escape.

      Given how there are people who obsess over every single move of his, I’d say that he may get old, but I doubt he’ll become inconsequential.

    9. redbug
      January 27th, 2013 | 9:21 am

      @ Raf:

      I don’t think it’s obsessive to point out that Arod is often linked to PED’s and the fact that he has lied to the Yankees more than once.

      This reminder in today’s NY Times:

      In March 2009, Rodriguez had hip surgery to repair a torn labrum in Philippon’s offices in Vail, Colo., and he returned to action two months later. In that instance, Philippon recommended that the Yankees use a Toronto-based specialist named Mark Lindsay, who had worked with Galea, to oversee Rodriguez’s rehabilitation. But Rodriguez was quietly seen by Galea, too.

      Initially, Rodriguez maintained to the Yankees that he had not been treated by Galea. However, that assertion was later contradicted by Galea, who said in 2010 that he had treated Rodriguez but said he never gave him performance-enhancing drugs.

      “He had a damaged hip,” Galea said at the time. “He needed anti-inflammatories.”

      Philippon claimed that he did not know that Galea had treated Rodriguez and questioned Galea’s assertions that Rodriguez had an inflamed hip. “If that’s the case, I would be surprised because Alex never told me that his hip hurt,” Philippon had said.

      Shortly thereafter, Rodriguez was interviewed by baseball’s investigators about his relationship with Galea and made his denials that Galea had treated him with performance-enhancing drugs.

      This time, Philippon and Galea are not involved in Rodriguez’s care. But an overall uncertainty about Rodriguez remains, for baseball and the Yankees. What they know is this: that Rodriguez admitted in March 2009 that he had used performance-enhancing substances from 2001 to 2003, while he was a member of the Texas Rangers; that he has not played in more than 140 games since 2007; that he has hit fewer than 20 home runs and driven in fewer than 70 runs in each of the last two seasons; and that with 647 home runs, he still needs 116 more to surpass Bonds. And that questions about Rodriguez never seem to go away.

    10. Raf
      January 27th, 2013 | 12:24 pm

      redbug wrote:

      I don’t think it’s obsessive to point out that Arod is often linked to PED’s and the fact that he has lied to the Yankees more than once.

      It may not be, but I’m referring to Rodriguez making news for the most trivial and mundane things; nailing strippers, sunbathing in central park, clubbing, etc, etc, etc.

      Hence my observation that he probably will never be inconsequential; too many people have too much invested in him.

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.