• Report: A-Rod Got PEDs From Anthony Bosch

    Posted by on January 29th, 2013 · Comments (34)

    How do you say Tic Tac’s in Spanish?

    Via the Miami New Times -

    This week, New Times takes you inside Biogenesis, an anti-aging clinic in Coral Gables run by Miami entrepreneur Anthony Bosch. His name is familiar to sports fans because he and his father, Dr. Pedro Bosch, were probed by authorities in 2009 when Manny Ramirez was suspended for violating baseball’s drug rules.

    An extraordinary cache of Bosch’s records suggests that Bosch has been supplying performance-enhancing drugs to some of the biggest names in sports, including Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez. Click through for a full look at all of A-Rod’s appearances in Bosch’s files.

    First, a word about the records. New Times reviewed a wide range of Biogenesis files, from a neatly kept spreadsheet of patients dated June 2012 to folders of loose documents. There are also daily logs of visitors and, most important, Tony Bosch’s personal notebooks from 2009 through 2012.

    In all, we reviewed 256 pages of handwritten notes from Bosch, a half-dozen full patient files, and more than 100 pages of other business documents from Biogenesis.

    How did we authenticate the records? New Times called dozens of numbers from client lists and Bosch’s personal notebooks. Virtually everyone we spoke with acknowledged their involvement with the clinic or politely declined to comment. There wasn’t a single denial. We also spoke to six clients who confirmed that their information — as recorded in the records — was accurate. Two former Biogenesis employees described intimate details of the clinic and its business.

    Bosch’s personal notebooks also check out in every other respect. Scrawled numbers to diagnostic clinics reach diagnostic clinics. Details about Bosch’s family life, business plans, and debts match public records.

    Alex Rodriguez appears 16 times in the documents we reviewed. His name is recorded as “Alex Rod” or “Alex R.” or by his nickname at the clinic, “Cacique.” This is particularly interesting because on ESPN, he acknowledged using PEDs but said he stopped in 2003.

    It’s also important to note that Rodriguez’s cousin, Miami resident Yuri Sucart, frequently appears in the same records on the same days as Rodriguez. Sucart has been identified in the past as Rodriguez’s source for performance-enhancing drugs.

    Now, to the records. We have redacted names that don’t appear multiple times in the records or who couldn’t be confirmed outside the records in some way. Also left out are regular clients whose names we did not believe to be newsworthy. More records will be posted on Riptide over the next few days.

    First, Biogenesis’s client list as of June 2012 includes a number of ballplayers, as well as their nicknames used by Bosch in his personal notebooks. A-Rod was “Cacique”:

    Here’s what the Yankees and A-Rod have to say about this news.

    Comments on Report: A-Rod Got PEDs From Anthony Bosch

    1. January 29th, 2013 | 1:02 pm

      The Editor of the Miami New Times is on the MLB Network right now.

    2. January 29th, 2013 | 1:04 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      The Editor of the Miami New Times is on the MLB Network right now.

      He says that they did 3 months of research on this and made 50 phone calls, as well as checking court records and talking to employees at the clinic – and the findings were, that the names in these records, all were legit that these players did business with Bosch.

    3. January 29th, 2013 | 1:06 pm

      A-Rod’s got some history going now: Angel Presinal, Anthony Galea and Anthony Bosch.

    4. January 29th, 2013 | 1:11 pm

      MLB’s statement on this one:

      “We are always extremely disappointed to learn of potential links between players and the use of performance-enhancing substances. These developments, however, provide evidence of the comprehensive nature of our anti-drug efforts. Through our Department of Investigations, we have been actively involved in the issues in South Florida. It is also important to note that three of the players allegedly involved have already been disciplined under the Joint Drug Program.

      “The recommendations of the Mitchell Report have once again played a critical role in Major League Baseball’s ongoing efforts against performance-enhancing drugs. MLB implemented all of the recommendations made by Senator Mitchell in 2007, several of which emphasized the significance of installing proactive investigative services.

      “The establishment of our Department of Investigations has represented a critical advance in these comprehensive efforts. In the years since its formation, DOI’s work has proven pivotal to bringing to light information regarding the use of performance-enhancing substances. Furthermore, DOI has built strong working relationships with federal and local law enforcement authorities. These relationships are crucial because only law enforcement officials have the capacity to reach those outside the game who are involved in the distribution of illegal performance-enhancing drugs.

      “Vigilance remains the key toward protecting the integrity of our game. We have the best and most stringent drug testing policy in professional sports, we continue to work with our doctors and trainers to learn what they are seeing day-to-day and we educate our players about the game’s unbending zero-tolerance approach. We remain fully committed to following all leads and seeking the appropriate outcomes for all those who use, purchase and are involved in the distribution of banned substances, which have no place in our game.

      “We are in the midst of an active investigation and are gathering and reviewing information. We will refrain from further comment until this process is complete.”

    5. January 29th, 2013 | 1:14 pm

      Ken Rosenthal, on the MLB Network, just now, said that the information in the reports on A-Rod is very clear. And, that MLB will need more information on this – and, if they get it, then they will take action on the players.

    6. January 29th, 2013 | 1:23 pm

      Mike Francesa just said that A-Rod hired one of the top lawyers in the United States to make sure the Yankees don’t try and void his contract.

    7. January 29th, 2013 | 1:26 pm

      A-Rod has hired Roy Black, per Pete Abe.

    8. redbug
      January 29th, 2013 | 1:30 pm

      @ Steve L.: “A-Rod’s got some history going now: Angel Presinal, Anthony Galea and Anthony Bosch.”

      Don’t forget cousin Yuri Sucart

    9. redbug
      January 29th, 2013 | 1:31 pm

      @ Steve L.: “A-Rod has hired Roy Black, per Pete Abe.”

      It’d be great if the Yanks can get out of the contract.

    10. January 29th, 2013 | 1:31 pm

      Say A-Rod doesn’t play at all this season.

      This means, from July 25, 2012 until Spring Training 2014, he would have played in 28 big league games. That’s 28 games over a period of 19 months. Rust, anyone?

    11. January 29th, 2013 | 1:33 pm

      redbug wrote:

      It’d be great if the Yanks can get out of the contract.

      If they ALL are smart, A-Rod, the Yankees, MLB, and the MLBPA get together and work out a settlement, to make all parties happy, in lieu of running up legal bills.

    12. KPOcala
      January 29th, 2013 | 1:36 pm

      NO WAY!!!

    13. January 29th, 2013 | 1:43 pm

      Jon Heyman, on WFAN, just said this could drag on for a while. But, he talked to some baseball people who said this could be the end of us seeing A-Rod as a major league baseball player.

    14. January 29th, 2013 | 1:50 pm

      Mike Francesa: A-Rod has now put himself at a level with Mark McGwire.

      Jon Heyman: It’s lower. He’s in Lance Armstrong territory.

    15. Garcia
      January 29th, 2013 | 2:02 pm

      I’m not sad.

    16. Scout
      January 29th, 2013 | 2:31 pm

      The penalty for drug use is suspension, not voiding a contract. It may be a different matter if A-rod perjured himself in a legal proceeding along the way, but I’m not aware of that. His agent is Scott Boras; Scott Boras’s clients do not walk away and leave money on the table. Sorry, folks, Hank Steinbrenner’s gift to Yankee fans isn’t going quietly into the night….

    17. #15
      January 29th, 2013 | 2:41 pm

      What an ugly turn in an already ugly saga. Wonder if his hip just got “terminal” and the insurance company will carry the load. With or without a contract payout, if they guy has half a brain he’s got to have $50-100 million banked. He’ll never have to worry about a financial thing for the rest of his life and, hopefully, he just fades away.

      If he was juicing, then: 1) he’s done as a sports star and hopefully as a Yankee, and no one will ever care about his stats (if anyone even still cares), 2) baseball’s testing program is a sham, 3) the players union will go silent and will get rolled in the next PED clause of the CBA, and 4) it’s time for the fine for testing positive to move to permenant ineligibility from the game.

    18. January 29th, 2013 | 2:46 pm

      I have wonder how pissed baseball is at A-Rod right now? If this is all true, it means that he continually sees himself as being above the game and the rules, by using PEDs. It’s like Pete Rose. He’s saying “FU” to the establishment and the rules and doing whatever he wants, no matter that he’s been called on the carpet before and warned.

      That said, there’s little that baseball can do to him, under the rules, right now. Maybe they are hoping for the DEA to do something with him? But, that’s a joke. We saw how the Feds handled Bonds and Clemens. It’s a waste of tax money.

    19. MJ Recanati
      January 29th, 2013 | 3:21 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      I have wonder how pissed baseball is at A-Rod right now? If this is all true, it means that he continually sees himself as being above the game and the rules, by using PEDs. It’s like Pete Rose. He’s saying “FU” to the establishment and the rules and doing whatever he wants, no matter that he’s been called on the carpet before and warned.

      A-Rod isn’t the only one that “continually sees himself as being above the game and the rules” if you consider that A-Rod is neither the only MLB player listed in this report, nor the only MLB player to be entwined in the PED issue since it began. The entire universe of MLB players has been warned — both officially by MLB and the union and unofficially by public opinion and the media — about PED use and yet players continue to use them because the testing regimen isn’t strong enough to catch all but the dumbest users.

      Steve L. wrote:

      That said, there’s little that baseball can do to him, under the rules, right now. Maybe they are hoping for the DEA to do something with him? But, that’s a joke. We saw how the Feds handled Bonds and Clemens. It’s a waste of tax money.

      Indeed. Short of a positive test or being caught in possession of PED’s, there is next to nothing that baseball can do about this. The various federal agencies can (and most likely will) try to pin something on Rodriguez but public sentiment for that course of action is incredibly low and the government’s success rate is abhorrent.

    20. January 29th, 2013 | 3:25 pm

      Ian O’Connor rings in with this:

      The narrative sounded plausible back then. In 2009, A-Rod copped to the steroid use reported in Sports Illustrated, experienced an epiphany or three after undergoing career-threatening hip surgery, and listened as two men (longtime friend Gui Socarras and Yankees PR man Jason Zillo) shouted at him during an intervention at a Tampa diner. Rodriguez supposedly returned to the Yankees a new man, and exorcised his postseason ghosts and goblins by leading his team to a championship.

      But if it’s proven Rodriguez did buy PEDs from Biogenesis, the clinic the New Times describes as “the East Coast version of BALCO,” his 2009 narrative will end up sounding as real as Manti Te’o’s girlfriend.

      “If this story is true,” said the baseball official, “how is that performance (in 2009) real? Alex had struggled in the postseason in the past and all of a sudden he performed at a superhuman level in ’09. How does that happen?”

      Maybe Rodriguez will come up with new answers for baseball investigators, just like Lance Armstrong came up with new answers for Oprah Winfrey. Either way, this much is clear:

      The same man who once upstaged the World Series by opting out of his contract has upstaged Super Bowl week by allegedly opting out of his responsibility as a clean athlete … again.

      The Yankees aren’t ready to comment on the specifics of this case, but there’s nobody in the organization who would dispute the fact that A-Rod now represents the worst investment they’ve made, 2009 title or no 2009 title. Carl Pavano for $40 million, A.J. Burnett for $82.5 million, and Kei Igawa for $20 million have nothing on Rodriguez for $275 million.

      Same goes for other people in other places. Mike Hampton for $121 million with the Rockies? Eddy Curry for $60 million with the Knicks. Albert Haynesworth for $100 million with the Redskins? Oliver Perez for $36 million with the Mets? Gilbert Arenas for $111 million with the Wizards?

      In the end, Alexander Emmanuel Rodriguez outplayed them all. He should take a victory lap around the bases for that.

      http://espn.go.com/new-york/mlb/story/_/id/8894217/latest-taint-makes-alex-rodriguez-contract-total-waste

    21. January 29th, 2013 | 4:22 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      A-Rod isn’t the only one that “continually sees himself as being above the game and the rules” if you consider that A-Rod is neither the only MLB player listed in this report, nor the only MLB player to be entwined in the PED issue since it began. The entire universe of MLB players has been warned — both officially by MLB and the union and unofficially by public opinion and the media — about PED use and yet players continue to use them because the testing regimen isn’t strong enough to catch all but the dumbest users.

      I know what you mean, but, seriously, after what happened in 2009, and what A-Rod said after it, to get caught again, is really rubbing it in the face of game and the fans. It’s up there with Rafael Palmeiro and the finger. It’s up there with Manny getting busted TWICE. It’s up there with Pete Rose swearing for a million years that he never bet on baseball and then coming out and saying that he did it. Call it stupid. Call it big balls. Call it whatever. It’s a whole ‘nother level than a guy like Melky Cabrera or Bartolo Colon.

    22. Garcia
      January 29th, 2013 | 5:10 pm

      @ Steve L.:
      Is it really whole ‘nother level? Or is he just a liar? I tend to think it’s the latter.

      He’s not someone you can trust when words start coming out of his mouth. With respect to all the other things, e.g. HOF, his standing in baseball, how he’s perceived by his fans (if he even has any), none of that really matters any more. He’s not anything special. He’s not someone people come to the ballpark to see. He’s about as significant as 24th man on the bench.

      ARod = Where a once promising baseball career goes to die a gruesome and dishonorable death.

      ARod’s baseball career: dead on arrival, 1/29/2013. RIP

    23. MJ Recanati
      January 29th, 2013 | 5:12 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      I know what you mean, but, seriously, after what happened in 2009, and what A-Rod said after it, to get caught again, is really rubbing it in the face of game and the fans. It’s up there with Rafael Palmeiro and the finger. It’s up there with Manny getting busted TWICE. It’s up there with Pete Rose swearing for a million years that he never bet on baseball and then coming out and saying that he did it. Call it stupid. Call it big balls. Call it whatever. It’s a whole ‘nother level than a guy like Melky Cabrera or Bartolo Colon.

      I suppose I see your point, except that I happen to believe that those who used in the past will continue to use in the future. For that reason, I don’t think Rodriguez is out of the ordinary. As you said, Manny got caught twice. I don’t think Manny did it out of disrespect to baseball or because he wanted to thumb his nose at authority. He did it because the incentives to use have never gone away and the testing regimen hasn’t improved much (if at all).

      Perhaps we’re in agreement in principle but we disagree on the meaning of the alleged findings.

    24. January 29th, 2013 | 5:25 pm

      @ Garcia:
      I hear what you are saying. The guy has been caught in so many lies now, it’s almost criminal. Then again, people say the same thing about Clemens and some others. Deny, deny, deny…

    25. Garcia
      January 29th, 2013 | 5:32 pm

      @ Steve L.:
      And I don’t trust Clemens at all. Do you?

    26. January 29th, 2013 | 5:37 pm

      @ Garcia:
      Clemens? I strongly suspect that he used PEDs – and got away with it because his accuser was a dirt bag and the government got schooled by his lawyer in court.

    27. Evan3457
      January 29th, 2013 | 5:59 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      Ian O’Connor rings in with this:

      But if it’s proven Rodriguez did buy PEDs from Biogenesis, the clinic the New Times describes as “the East Coast version of BALCO,” his 2009 narrative will end up sounding as real as Manti Te’o’s girlfriend.
      “If this story is true,” said the baseball official, “how is that performance (in 2009) real? Alex had struggled in the postseason in the past and all of a sudden he performed at a superhuman level in ’09. How does that happen?”

      You do realize this makes no sense whatsoever.

      He did PEDs in the postseason of 2009, and all the years since, but he has a superhuman performance only in the 2009 postseason, but not in 2010 and 2011.

      How does that add up? He stopped doing them in the post-season of 2010 and 2011? Why? He did them all last year, but still struggled? He got hurt last year? What?

    28. Evan3457
      January 29th, 2013 | 6:02 pm

      Well, it sure looks like he did PEDs again. But what if they investigate and he beats the rap? Then what?

      I guess we treat it like Clemens.

      But the whole Clemens thing brewed up after his retirement. A-rod is still active. If he beats the rap, and there’s no test showing he used, what can baseball do? What can the Yankees do?

      I’ll tell you what: not a damn thing, unless they buy out the rest of his deal. All of it. And then, baseball can blackball him, as they did with Bonds, but not officially, or it’s a collusion lawsuit.

    29. piplom
      January 29th, 2013 | 6:04 pm

      You’ll never stop A-rod, or anyone else, from taking steroids.You really want to stop PED’s? Make sure every contract signed includes a clause that it’s void if a player tests positive. Hit Steroid users where it will REALLY hurt–in their wallets.
      If a player doesn’t care about the game enough to play fair, why would he care if he risks a 50 game suspension? To them, it’s just a two month vacation–then they could go back and collect multi-million dollar paychecks for swinging a bat?

      In other words, it’s not about legacies or MVP trophies, and it most certainly isn’t about baseball. To quote another Yankee blogger, “It’s about the MONEY, Stupid!”

    30. Evan3457
      January 29th, 2013 | 6:51 pm
    31. JeremyM
      January 29th, 2013 | 8:02 pm

      If they can’t do the impossible (someone find Tom Cruise) then to me they will probably just have to eat the rest of the contract and move on. If he was on stuff over the last 3 years, it didn’t help much, and now he’s recovering from hip surgery. He’s done. Toast. I don’t think he will have another at bat in MLB but then again the A’s resigned Bartolo, so someone will probably give him a shot.

    32. Raf
      January 29th, 2013 | 9:47 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      “If this story is true,” said the baseball official, “how is that performance (in 2009) real? Alex had struggled in the postseason in the past and all of a sudden he performed at a superhuman level in ’09. How does that happen?”

      Good question. Another question; if he was juicing in 2005 & 2007, what happened in the postseason those years?

    33. Raf
      January 29th, 2013 | 9:50 pm

      Garcia wrote:

      Is it really whole ‘nother level? Or is he just a liar? I tend to think it’s the latter.

      Yep. Not the first, probably won’t be the last.

    34. Evan3457
      January 29th, 2013 | 10:41 pm

      Raf wrote:

      Good question. Another question; if he was juicing in 2005 & 2007, what happened in the postseason those years?

      ‘Zackly.

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