• Is A-Rod’s Career Over?

    Posted by on January 30th, 2013 · Comments (14)

    From Bob Klapisch today -

    Say goodbye to Alex Rodriguez and whatever good memories you have of this disgraced slugger, assuming there are any left to conjure. A-Rod has been linked (again) to performance-enhancing drugs, as recently as last season, putting the finishing touches on his now-utterly trashed legacy — baseball’s all-time fraud.

    This is our hunch about Rodriguez’s career: It’s over, and not just because of the severity of his recent hip surgery. Rodriguez knows his reputation has been shredded — no one believes his denials, especially the Bombers. Their lawyers are already crawling all over the language of Rodriguez’s contract, looking for ways to void that absurd $275 million investment, of which he’s still owed $114 million.

    That would be reason enough to send A-Rod into hiding, but there’s an even more compelling reason to write him off now. It’s the psychological dependency on PEDs — he’s been hooked all along and was too weak to ever stop. Rodriguez may look like a bruiser, but don’t be fooled. He’s nothing without his syringes and pills and creams. He can’t compete without them.

    There’s no way out — the relationship with the Yankees and their fans is too toxic. Rodriguez was reportedly dumb enough to keep breaking the rules, but he’s savvy enough to know he’s used up the last of his equity. Just wait and see, A-Rod will find a doctor to say he’s medically unable to keep playing, like Albert Belle, whose own career ended in 2000 because of hip problems. This convenient detour will allow A-Rod to pocket the rest of his money and give the Yankees 85 percent reimbursement from their insurers.

    Dishonest or not, it would be the ultimate face-saver, and don’t think for a minute Yankee elders aren’t praying for this very road map. They’ve cursed themselves a hundred times over for that crazy contract, the one general manager Brian Cashman tried to block. Now, finally, there’s a way out.

    Will ownership try to void the deal in the meantime? They’re already dreaming about it. But the process will be long and meticulous; it’s the commissioner’s office, not the Yankees, who’ll be investigating. The feds are involved, too, according to one person familiar with the day’s developments. The Drug Enforcement Agency is sniffing around Biogenesis of America, the Coral Gables, Fla., anti-aging clinic that, according to the Miami New Times, was more like a drug factory for athletes — an East Coast BALCO. A-Rod was listed among its clientele. The government will eventually learn if the published claims are verifiable, whether A-Rod was trafficking in controlled or illegal substances.

    That would mean an immediate 50-game suspension per MLB’s drug policy, which could be actionable by the Yankees. So could proof that Rodriguez was being treated by a non-team physician without management’s knowledge or consent. That would be a loophole the Steinbrenner family would gladly blast right open.

    Has there ever been a player with a baseball resume like Alex Rodriguez who was run out of the game as an active player by shame? Maybe Joe Jackson…but, he didn’t quit out of shame…the commish banned him.

    Comments on Is A-Rod’s Career Over?

    1. #15
      January 30th, 2013 | 12:45 pm

      I think this article has it about right. A-Rod will likely look for a way to back out of the game with some large check in hand. Hopefully it’s signed by Joe Blow from the insurance company and not Hal.

      Think about it…. Even a 50 game suspension saves the Yankees ~ $8 million dollars!

    2. MJ Recanati
      January 30th, 2013 | 12:56 pm

      #15 wrote:

      I think this article has it about right. A-Rod will likely look for a way to back out of the game with some large check in hand. Hopefully it’s signed by Joe Blow from the insurance company and not Hal.

      Actually this article is simplistic nonsense. Finding a doctor to claim Rodriguez physically unable to play won’t result in the Yankees’ insurers paying out on Rodriguez’s contract. Insurers aren’t going to just roll over on a potential $97M settlement, they’re going to subject Rodriguez to a battery of tests from insurance-friendly doctors who will find every possible reason why Rodriguez can still play baseball.

      If the Yankees think they’re getting out from under this contract anytime soon, they’re delusional. There’s no precedent for a voided contract, even for suspicion of PED use (Barry Bonds, Jason Giambi). There’s also no precedent for a voided contract for a player seeking his own medical treatments (Carlos Beltran, Carl Pavano). The only way out is either retirement by Rodriguez (not happening) or a negotiated buyout (where Rodriguez has all the leverage to simply say no).

      #15 wrote:

      Think about it…. Even a 50 game suspension saves the Yankees ~ $8 million dollars!

      $8,641,975.31 to be exact. But that money doesn’t go anywhere except the owner’s pocket — it doesn’t offer relief for luxury tax purposes — so there’s actually no benefit to Yankees fans whatsoever.

    3. MJ Recanati
      January 30th, 2013 | 12:58 pm

      #15 wrote:

      Think about it…. Even a 50 game suspension saves the Yankees ~ $8 million dollars!

      It’s also worth noting that a player can serve his suspension while on the disabled list. Since we already knew that Rodriguez would miss at least the first three months of the season, all a suspension would amount to would be unpaid leave.

    4. #15
      January 30th, 2013 | 3:57 pm

      @ MJ Recanati:
      Guess we’ll see how it unfolds. I do think we are in a different time than when Giami, Bonds, Sosa, etc… got “famous”. Some of their actions occured before the rules were well-defined. Not the case if A-Rod was using in 2009, right after his heartfelt teepee pow-wow at Legends Field. There is less tolerance in the fan base and the media. Plus, the daggers will be out for A-Rod (and the Yankees) on this.

      $8.6 million not in A-Rod’s pocket.???? How can that not be a good thing. The time off (I seriously doubt the investigation will be wrapped up before July) also makes his performance milestones even less likely to ever be reached.

    5. MJ Recanati
      January 30th, 2013 | 4:30 pm

      #15 wrote:

      I do think we are in a different time than when Giami, Bonds, Sosa, etc… got “famous”. Some of their actions occured before the rules were well-defined. Not the case if A-Rod was using in 2009, right after his heartfelt teepee pow-wow at Legends Field. There is less tolerance in the fan base and the media. Plus, the daggers will be out for A-Rod (and the Yankees) on this.

      We might be in a different time than 5-10 years ago with Bonds/Giambi but the fact remains that terminating a contract is no easy feat. If it were, then all the guys that have been busted for PED’s would’ve had their contract status threatened. Moreover, between the players union and Rodriguez himself filing suit, it’s doubtful the Yankees really want to open that rainstorm of shit upon themselves.

      #15 wrote:

      8.6 million not in A-Rod’s pocket.???? How can that not be a good thing.

      I guess I just don’t see why this matters. If the money isn’t going back to the fans or back into the team, what difference does it make if Rodriguez or Steinbrenner end up with it? Why celebrate something that doesn’t change anything for fans or for the team?

    6. #15
      January 30th, 2013 | 5:22 pm

      I think the difference is A-Rod will be the focus of intense mockery and ridicule and may look for an exit, albiet with a nice payout (but short of $114 million), either through insurance or the Yankees. As far as the insurance goes, it will be difficult to prove, or disprove, how much pain he is in. For a guy that has been so hyper image aware, it will be very tough to stomach being the face of PED’s for the next 5 years. No tearful confession will absolve him at this point. He used up his one chip on the topic in 2009. The all-time records and the associated incentives no longer matter. I think if he was offered ~ $60 million to go away… he’d go. He’d be buying distance from the media for his money. He might try to hide it under the cover of retirement because he didn’t want to hurt the team, etc…

      The 8.6 million is still available to the organization, as opposed to in A-Rod’s pocket. They can use it in future years (post 2014, for example) if they so choose.

    7. Raf
      January 30th, 2013 | 5:34 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      I guess I just don’t see why this matters.

      You should; It’s Alex Rodriguez, fer cryin’ out loud! :P

    8. LMJ229
      January 30th, 2013 | 10:27 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      Has there ever been a player with a baseball resume like Alex Rodriguez who was run out of the game as an active player by shame? Maybe Joe Jackson…but, he didn’t quit out of shame…the commish banned him.

      I don’t see A-Rod just up and leaving. The guy has no shame.

    9. MJ Recanati
      January 31st, 2013 | 8:55 am

      LMJ229 wrote:

      I don’t see A-Rod just up and leaving. The guy has no shame.

      This has nothing to do with shame or decency or anything else contrived that people like to preach about from the top of their soapboxes. Rodriguez is owed $114M and the Yankees are contractually obligated to pay him his money. He’d be stupid to walk away from that; at the very least he owes it to himself and his family to force the Yankees into a settlement.

      To walk away would be against his best interests and that’s all there is to it. Anyone else in the same position would similarly not leave $114M on the table like that.

    10. January 31st, 2013 | 9:52 am

      Don’t forget that A-Rod has already made more money than most people could even dream about…

      He’s probably made enough money, to date, to set up the next four generations of his family to live a lavish life.

      That said, he might be willing to accept fifty cents on the dollar of that $114 in exchange for being able to walk away peacefully.

      He doesn’t need to be Warren Buffet rich. He can be Mike Bloomberg rich and still be way ahead of the game.

    11. MJ Recanati
      January 31st, 2013 | 10:08 am

      Steve L. wrote:

      Don’t forget that A-Rod has already made more money than most people could even dream about…He’s probably made enough money, to date, to set up the next four generations of his family to live a lavish life.That said, he might be willing to accept fifty cents on the dollar of that $114 in exchange for being able to walk away peacefully.He doesn’t need to be Warren Buffet rich. He can be Mike Bloomberg rich and still be way ahead of the game.

      I’ve never understood why people continue to repeat this. His accumulated wealth has nothing to do with it. He’s owed $114M and he’d be stupid to leave that kind of money on the table. Moreover, he has all the leverage in this situation to where he wouldn’t have to accept only 50% of the remaining value of his contract. He’s entitled to $114 and he won’t take much less than $100M of it at minimum.

      Bloomberg, Buffett and others are wealthy but do you see them putting the brakes on other revenue-generating endeavors? Of course not. Rodriguez worked for that money and the Yankees owe it to him. Plain and simple.

    12. January 31st, 2013 | 11:01 am

      Maybe it’s just me? I like to believe that some people out there, once they reach a wealth level where it’s fantasy level high, come to the conclusion that they have more money than can possibly be spent over the rest of their lifetime and that of their children, and then say “Do I really need any more money?”

    13. MJ Recanati
      January 31st, 2013 | 11:36 am

      Steve L. wrote:

      Maybe it’s just me? I like to believe that some people out there, once they reach a wealth level where it’s fantasy level high, come to the conclusion that they have more money than can possibly be spent over the rest of their lifetime and that of their children, and then say “Do I really need any more money?”

      It’s definitely just you. Everyone’s “wealth level equilibrium” is different and, for regular folks like us, we look at them and think “how much more?” For them, it’s no different than us, just with more zeroes. Everyone wants more, especially if it’s available to them, and especially if it’s guaranteed to them by contract.

    14. Garcia
      January 31st, 2013 | 11:52 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      It’s definitely just you. Everyone’s “wealth level equilibrium” is different and, for regular folks like us, we look at them and think “how much more?” For them, it’s no different than us, just with more zeroes. Everyone wants more, especially if it’s available to them, and especially if it’s guaranteed to them by contract.

      Exactly. If you don’t have a frame of reference, then you have no way of ever really knowing how you’d act. Plus you develop different needs, more expensive needs, and the only way to keep it up is by continuously bringing in more money.

      It’s the same cycle people fall-in today with a lot less money — the difference is that the cycle is in paying off the debt they’ve incurred.

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.