• Schilling: Red Sox Asked Me To Juice

    Posted by on February 7th, 2013 · Comments (4)

    Via WEEI:

    Curt Schilling, in a Wednesday interview on ESPN Radio, said toward the end of his tenure with the Red Sox he was encouraged to use performance-enhancing drugs by “members of the organization.”

    “At the end of my career, in 2008 when I had gotten hurt, there was a conversation that I was involved in in which it was brought to my attention that this is a potential path I might want to pursue,” Schilling told Colin Cowherd.

    Asked for more details, Schilling said the conversation occurred in the clubhouse and involved “former members of the organization — they’re no longer there. It was an incredibly uncomfortable conversation. Because it came up in the midst of a group of people. The other people weren’t in the conversation but they could clearly hear the conversation. And it was suggested to me that at my age and in my situation, why not? What did I have to lose? Because if I wasn’t going to get healthy, it didn’t matter. And if I did get healthy, great.

    “It caught me off guard, to say the least. That was an awkward situation.”

    Timing is everything. This was a year after the Mitchell Report was released. Then again, Manny and Big Papi didn’t make the report – and they were juicing as far back as 2003.

    Comments on Schilling: Red Sox Asked Me To Juice

    1. MJ Recanati
      February 7th, 2013 | 2:09 pm

      This doesn’t surprise me at all. Given that, it sort of answers the question Steve posed yesterday regarding Cashman’s seeming lack of awareness that Cervelli, Montero, Rodriguez and Cabrera were all allegedly working with Biogenesis Lab in Miami. It would seem to me that every organization knows (or has good reason to suspect) which of its players use banned substances and it wouldn’t surprise me to learn that teams encourage players to use PED’s.

      As I said yesterday, the upside is shared by both player and team but the downside is borne exclusively by the player. For that reason, the team has every reason to encourage players to use PED’s since the team has so little to risk overall.

    2. Raf
      February 7th, 2013 | 7:43 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      This doesn’t surprise me at all.

      Given his talk with Clemens? :D

    3. #15
      February 7th, 2013 | 9:54 pm

      I’ve said countless times the Mitchell report was a tainted study in that it pull at selected PED threads and ignored others, including among the team with financial ties to the studies primary author. This story not only makes that point, it throws gasoline on the fire. Remember, Mitchell is a politician… he’s worse that the PED users at telling it straight and an expert at covering his own hide. I read the whole report and was shocked at how much, and who, wasn’t discussed/investigated. To this day I wish MLB had given the report to the players union, told them this is what we’ve got, and if you don’t agree to a tough as nails testing program we are going to 1) publish the report, 2) investigate every other lead we have and publish them too, and 3) everyone found guilty will get a long suspension. Alternatively, if you agree to the strict testing any stern punishment we’ll 1) bury the report, 2) say that we all agree there was a huge problem and here’s what we are doing about it, and 3) since we can’t name everyone, we aren’t naming anyone. There would have been a huge outcry about a flawed study (there was anyway), the innocent would have been assumed guilty (they were/are anyway), and baseball might have moved forward (they clearly did not get it done via Mitchell).

    4. MJ Recanati
      February 8th, 2013 | 11:29 am

      #15 wrote:

      I’ve said countless times the Mitchell report was a tainted study in that it pull at selected PED threads and ignored others, including among the team with financial ties to the studies primary author. This story not only makes that point, it throws gasoline on the fire. Remember, Mitchell is a politician… he’s worse that the PED users at telling it straight and an expert at covering his own hide. I read the whole report and was shocked at how much, and who, wasn’t discussed/investigated.

      Couldn’t agree more. The Mitchell Report was a bought-and-paid-for hatchet job by a man with conflicts of interest out the ying-yang as a member of the board of both the Red Sox and ABC/Disney, ESPN’s parent company which is one of MLB’s biggest broadcast partners. Because MLB had no subpoena power, Mitchell basically called in a few favors and got to sit in (and ask questions) during federal interrogations of suspected PED suppliers. Worse yet, those suspects/witnesses were coerced into helping the MLB investigation even though Mitchell had no right to be there.

      #15 wrote:

      To this day I wish MLB had given the report to the players union, told them this is what we’ve got, and if you don’t agree to a tough as nails testing program we are going to 1) publish the report, 2) investigate every other lead we have and publish them too, and 3) everyone found guilty will get a long suspension. Alternatively, if you agree to the strict testing any stern punishment we’ll 1) bury the report, 2) say that we all agree there was a huge problem and here’s what we are doing about it, and 3) since we can’t name everyone, we aren’t naming anyone.

      What would’ve been the point of that since we already know that the owners used the Mitchell Report as their cover to absolve themselves of their complicity in the PED epidemic. Blaming the players is much easier for ownership/management than actually presenting a logical and balanced solution.

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