• PED Heat Continues On A-Rod

    Posted by on February 21st, 2013 · Comments (16)

    Via the Daily News -

    While all eyes have been on Anthony Bosch’s Biogenesis anti-aging clinic in South Florida, Major League Baseball investigators have quietly revisited the scene of another performance-enhancing drug scandal: Buffalo.

    Sources familiar with MLB’s investigation into Bosch and his ties to two dozen or more players say investigators are looking at testimony provided to federal authorities by Alex Rodriguez and others in regard to the prosecution of Toronto physician Anthony Galea.

    “We’ve been in Buffalo and we continue to be in Buffalo,” an MLB official told the Daily News.

    Galea pleaded guilty in December of 2011 to bringing unapproved drugs, including human growth hormone and Actovegin, into the United States and served a year of supervised release. He had been indicted in October of 2010 by a federal grand jury in Buffalo on five charges that alleged he distributed performance-enhancing drugs — including HGH — to professional athletes in the United States. Rodriguez, Carlos Beltran, Jose Reyes, Carlos Delgado and Tiger Woods were among his clients.

    According to court papers, Galea’s assistant Mary Anne Catalano told investigators she witnessed Galea inject athletes with a mixture of substances. Catalano was arrested in 2009 after her car was stopped at the Peace Bridge border crossing in Buffalo, and authorities found human growth hormone and other drugs in her Nissan. Catalano told investigators that Galea had entered the United States on numerous occasions between July of 2007 and September of 2009 to treat 23 MLB and NFL athletes in New York, Tampa and other cities.

    The New York Times reported in 2010 that Galea had injected Rodriguez with a cocktail of drugs on at least one occasion, although its ingredients were not known.

    During the investigation into Galea, MLB interviewed Rodriguez, who told investigators he had not received performance-enhancing drugs from Galea. If baseball finds that Rodriguez testified differently to a grand jury or other federal investigators, it can move toward disciplining the embattled Yankee third baseman. Investigators are interested in what Galea testified to, as well, as he was negotiating his plea agreement. There are three sealed documents in the case file.

    MLB hopes to gain cooperation from federal agents who might be able to help them in their investigation of the burgeoning Bosch scandal. The Daily News first reported on Jan. 26 that Bosch was under investigation by MLB and the Drug Enforcement Administration for providing illegal drugs to at least 20 baseball players and to others through his Miami clinic, and that Rodriguez was an associate of Bosch’s.

    …If baseball finds that Rodriguez testified differently to a grand jury or other federal investigators, it can move toward disciplining the embattled Yankee third baseman…

    It looks like MLB, perhaps with the Yankees urging them, really wants to nail A-Rod anyway they can and burn him at the stake.

    Comments on PED Heat Continues On A-Rod

    1. MJ Recanati
      February 21st, 2013 | 8:33 am

      77yankees wrote:

      It looks like MLB, perhaps with the Yankees urging them, really wants to nail A-Rod anyway they can and burn him at the stake.

      I’ve added the emphasis in order to pose the question: to what end? I understand why MLB wants to bust Rodriguez and every other PED user. I don’t think it makes any sense — and thus I dispute your assertion — that the Yankees would seek to penalize their own player. The Yankees are better with Rodriguez than without him, even in his declining state. Unless the Steinbrenners want to buy another Kentucky Derby horse for the $8.6M they’d save by not paying Rodriguez 50 games’ worth of salary, I just don’t see the motivation here.

    2. February 21st, 2013 | 8:43 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      I’ve added the emphasis in order to pose the question: to what end?

      If A-Rod is banned from baseball, for some reason, I have to think the Yankees would then try and void the $114 million they owe him.

    3. MJ Recanati
      February 21st, 2013 | 8:46 am

      Steve L. wrote:

      If A-Rod is banned from baseball, for some reason, I have to think the Yankees would then try and void the $114 million they owe him.

      Alex Rodriguez will not be banned from baseball. There’s a non-zero chance that he’s suspended for 50 games but that’s the extent of it.

      The Yankees have no grounds to void his contract. People need to stop dreaming.

    4. Garcia
      February 21st, 2013 | 10:10 am

      How is this even legal? MLB is a private company, under what grounds can they get sealed information that the federal government has collected?

      I don’t care if they implicate ARod based on the agreements of the CBA, but to use the federal government to get you information is not right to me.

      If baseball finds that Rodriguez testified differently to a grand jury or other federal investigators, it can move toward disciplining the embattled Yankee third baseman.

      Whether you hate ARod or not, how the hell does a government case give baseball the right to suspend ARod based on him lying under oath? The government can go after him for perjury, but under what grounds does baseball have to get access to this information to then use against one of its employees. I can understand if ARod was a police officer, or a federal officer why this information would be valuable. You can’t have someone that’s supposed to arrest folks lying under oath. All ARod does is swing at dopey balls for a living.

      This makes absolutely no sense to me.

    5. Garcia
      February 21st, 2013 | 10:12 am

      Steve,
      How does this not bother you?

      There are three sealed documents in the case file.

      MLB hopes to gain cooperation from federal agents who might be able to help them in their investigation of the burgeoning Bosch scandal.

      “gain cooperation”, WTF!!!!

    6. Garcia
      February 21st, 2013 | 10:16 am

      I was arrested in my 20s, I was never convicted, and the case was thrown out of court. The information from the arrest is sealed since there was no conviction. I would be eff’ing damned if my employer tried to get that sealed information opened.

      Unless I was going for a job where that information needed to be opened up, like a federal position, needed top-level clearance, police officer, etc. Other than that, I don’t see how MLB can request this information to use against one of its employees’.

    7. MJ Recanati
      February 21st, 2013 | 11:17 am

      Garcia wrote:

      I don’t see how MLB can request this information to use against one of its employees.

      You’re absolutely right that MLB shouldn’t have the right but we all know that powerful people in high places are more than happy to scratch eachothers’ backs. We’ve already seen Senator George Mitchell use his influence so that he could “sit in” on federal questioning of Kirk Radomski (the PED dealer that used to be a Mets clubhouse attendant) so this is really more of the same.

      The Feds are interested in the topic of PED’s and have shown a willingness to spend inordinate amounts of time and money on the subject. If they feel that cooperation with MLB will help them in that cause, they’ll gladly share information in order to get PED users busted (in the hopes that busting users leads to getting to dealers/distributors).

      It’s shameful on the part of the government that they’d share information and it’s unethical on MLB’s part that they’d ask for access to information that they shouldn’t otherwise have. Nevertheless, it’s been done before and will be done again.

    8. throwstrikes
      February 21st, 2013 | 12:28 pm

      US Attorneys office in Buffalo has already told MLB they won’t help them. Short of them getting someone to give them illegal info it’s just the Daily News and MLB blowing smoke.

    9. MJ Recanati
      February 21st, 2013 | 1:09 pm

      throwstrikes wrote:

      Short of them getting someone to give them illegal info

      That’s where MLB can dust off their lackey, Senator George Mitchell.

    10. #15
      February 21st, 2013 | 5:04 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      77yankees wrote:

      Unless the Steinbrenners want to buy another Kentucky Derby horse for the $8.6M they’d save by not paying Rodriguez 50 games’ worth of salary, I just don’t see the motivation here.

      Ummmm…. 8.6 million bucks is 8.6 million bucks, especially when he isn’t even on the field.

      One other angle on this…. As I understand the rule, it’s 50 games for the first violation, 100 games for the second violation, and I don’t recall where it goes from there. Could A-Rod have two latent violations (at different points in time with different Dr.s)? That might give them grounds for effectively suspending him for ~ 150 games, or ~ a year. ~ $25 million bucks is $25 million bucks.

    11. Evan3457
      February 21st, 2013 | 9:22 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Alex Rodriguez will not be banned from baseball. There’s a non-zero chance that he’s suspended for 50 games but that’s the extent of it.
      The Yankees have no grounds to void his contract.

      Bingo.

    12. MJ Recanati
      February 22nd, 2013 | 9:04 am

      #15 wrote:

      Ummmm…. 8.6 million bucks is 8.6 million bucks, especially when he isn’t even on the field.

      I don’t get your point. It’s not like the team will reinvest that money back into the roster and they’re sure as heck not giving fans any piece of that money either. All that money represents is a potential discount to the owners on their 2013 operating costs, nothing more.

    13. MJ Recanati
      February 22nd, 2013 | 9:07 am

      #15 wrote:

      As I understand the rule, it’s 50 games for the first violation, 100 games for the second violation, and I don’t recall where it goes from there. Could A-Rod have two latent violations (at different points in time with different Dr.s)? That might give them grounds for effectively suspending him for ~ 150 games, or ~ a year. ~ $25 million bucks is $25 million bucks.

      No. Rodriguez has never been suspended so he wouldn’t automatically jump to the third strike when he hasn’t even had “strike one” levied against him.

      As I said, there’s a chance he’s suspended for 50 games for being a first-time offender under MLB’s substance policy. That’s the realistic maximum penalty Rodriguez will face here and nothing more.

    14. February 22nd, 2013 | 9:51 am

      I think the difference here may be that A-Rod would not be judged/punished under the CBA PED test rules, but, rather, under the commish’s call (as he sees fit) for lying to the league during an investigation (if, what he told Bud’s boys was different from what he told the Feds under oath).

    15. February 22nd, 2013 | 9:52 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      All that money represents is a potential discount to the owners on their 2013 operating costs, nothing more.

      Or, in other words, increasing their profit. Which, I believe, would interest the team, every time.

    16. #15
      February 22nd, 2013 | 10:33 am

      @ MJ Recanati:
      Do the math…. 8.6 million in A-Rod’s pocket while he’s sitting, or 8.6 million in the Yankees pocket while he’s sitting???

      What point is there to not get? It doesn’t matter if it goes to player development, a much needed new hot tub in the Tampa trainers room, towels in the executive washroom, Hank’s hay barn, Cano’s pocket, or new indoor-outdoor carpet in Jessica’s portcullis… they’d want the money.

      If the Bosch stuff has legs, I do think there are several path’s to A-Rod getting trimmed for more than a 50 game suspension, either for multiple PED threads or lying to fed/MLB investigators.

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.