• May 29, 2013 – Time To Wake-Up & Realize Yanks W-L Record Is An Illusion

    Posted by on May 29th, 2013 · Comments (69)

    As of this morning, the New York Yankees are 30-21 in 2013. That’s a winning percentage of .588 (over those 51 games).

    That overall mark is good for second place in the A.L. East (one game back of Boston) and the third best winning percentage in the American League.

    When a Yankees fan sees this, they go “Yeaaaaaa!”

    However, look inside the numbers. To date, the Yankees have played the Toronto Blue Jays nine times and the Kansas City Royals three times. Both of those teams have not done well this season, so far. Check out these numbers:

    The Blue Jays are 22-30 and in last place in the A.L. East. They have a “winning” percentage of .423 this season. The Royals are 21-28 and in last place in the A.L. Central. They have a “winning” percentage of .429 this season.

    Basically, Toronto and Kansas City are the among the worst teams in the league this season (along with the Astros, Twins and Mariners). Got it?

    O.K., the Yankees, this season to date, are 11-1 when playing the Blue Jays and Royals.

    Do the math from there. This means the Yankees are 19-20 this season when they don’t have the benefit of beating up on the crappy Jays and Royals. And, that’s not good.

    Sure, there have been injuries. No A-Rod, Jeter, Teixeira yet this season. And, Granderson’s just about been out the whole year. Also, Youkilis, Pettitte, Nunez, Chamberlain, Nova and Cervelli got hurt. But, that’s just an excuse.

    Vernon Wells got off to a good start this season (before hitting the skids recently). In addition, Travis Hafner, Robinson Cano, Brett Gardner and Lyle Overbay have done as well as reasonable expected – if not better. Further, on the pitching side, could the Yankees bullpen be any better than shown this year? And, in the rotation, Hiroki Kuroda has been lights-out, CC Sabathia has been not terrible and David Phelps has been solid. Therefore, it’s not like the Yankees are going out there with a Miami Marlins or Houston Astros type roster. There’s no excuse for being a game under five-hundred when not facing the crap teams in the league…other than the fact that they are not playing well.

    In summary, that’s it. The New York Yankees are not playing well this season, even if their won-loss record is 30-21. And, it’s time to wake-up and realize that in Yankeeland.

    Comments on May 29, 2013 – Time To Wake-Up & Realize Yanks W-L Record Is An Illusion

    1. Mr. October
      June 2nd, 2013 | 8:49 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Doubly moronic. Nobody brags about their “pennant winning rings”. Nobody. You are selectively using pennants because the Yankees have won so many divisions and won so few pennants lately.

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Evading the point. Not a surprise.

      Less “moronic” than crediting Cashman with three world championships from 1998-2000 for which he has three rings. The “point” is that rings are not awarded for division titles, they are awarded for pennants and world championships. And since John Cashman’s son “wrested” his almost complete “control of the universe” in 2005, there has been only one such ceremony in The Bronx.
      Evan3457 wrote:

      You have to set the bar at pennant, because otherwise, your anti-Cashman tirades are laughable on their face.

      What’s laughable on its face is calling one pennant and one world championship in nine years with $200-30 mil. spent each season and an interminable game of musical chairs in the front end of the rotation “spectacular success.”

    2. June 2nd, 2013 | 11:17 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      Less “moronic” than crediting Cashman with three world championships from 1998-2000 for which he has three rings. The “point” is that rings are not awarded for division titles, they are awarded for pennants and world championships. And since John Cashman’s son “wrested” his almost complete “control of the universe” in 2005, there has been only one such ceremony in The Bronx.

      Amen. And, that one ring in 2009 was fuel by the Stein Bros. checkbook and A-Rod being full on Canadian PEDs.

    3. Raf
      June 2nd, 2013 | 11:57 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      And, that one ring in 2009 was fuel by the Stein Bros. checkbook

      Yeah, let’s not act like the Yankees weren’t spending before that;
      http://www.nytimes.com/1995/12/31/sports/notebook-budget-what-yankees-budget.html

    4. LMJ229
      June 3rd, 2013 | 12:27 am

      Raf wrote:

      Yeah, let’s not act like the Yankees weren’t spending before that;
      http://www.nytimes.com/1995/12/31/sports/notebook-budget-what-yankees-budget.html

      While it may be true that the Yankees have always outspent every other ML team, I believe the gap between them and the rest of the league has been consistently larger than years past during Cashman’s reign.

    5. Greg H.
      June 3rd, 2013 | 1:21 am

      Those of us on this site that defend Cashman don’t necessarily do so because we’re “Cashman Fans.” I will speak for myself only, but I defend him here because most of the arguments made against him here are not logical, and/or they smell like spoiled Yankee fans.

      The most common thread is the old “the more you spend, the better the team should be,” and if you spend the most, and your team doesn’t win a world series, then the GM is an idiot. This has ben proven patently false, mostly by the Yankees themselves, but more recently by quite a few other teams, like the Red Sox, Phillies, Dodgers, Angels, Blue Jays, Marlins, et al.

      The second most ridiculous premise is the idea that “nothing matters except world series rings.” Really? Well it’s been demonstrated irrefutably that making the playoffs dramatically increases the team’s chances of winning the world series by 100% over those teams that do not make the playoffs. So if the goal of every team is to win the world series, then the primary goal of all teams must be to make the playoffs. And the Yankees, under their current leadership, make the playoffs more than any other team.

      No one here is contending that Cashman is the best GM. But he is not a bad GM, and he’s not an idiot. By any objective measure, he’s in the top third. But most importantly, his teams usually make the playoffs, which says to me that he gives the team a chance to win it all every year. When fans take that for granted, that’s acting spoiled.

    6. Raf
      June 3rd, 2013 | 8:53 am

      LMJ229 wrote:

      Raf wrote:
      Yeah, let’s not act like the Yankees weren’t spending before that;
      http://www.nytimes.com/1995/12/31/sports/notebook-budget-what-yankees-budget.html
      While it may be true that the Yankees have always outspent every other ML team, I believe the gap between them and the rest of the league has been consistently larger than years past during Cashman’s reign.

      You may want to take a look at the salary structure of the game since then. Take a look at payroll vs revenue. Account for the fact that the Yankees have been in the hunt since 1993.

    7. LMJ229
      June 3rd, 2013 | 9:55 am

      Greg H. wrote:

      The most common thread is the old “the more you spend, the better the team should be,” and if you spend the most, and your team doesn’t win a world series, then the GM is an idiot. This has been proven patently false, mostly by the Yankees themselves, but more recently by quite a few other teams, like the Red Sox, Phillies, Dodgers, Angels, Blue Jays, Marlins, et al.

      If this philosophy has been proven patently false, then why are all of the Yankee teams consistently built on spending? And isn’t that exactly how we won the World Series in 2009 – the only World Series fully attributable to Cashman? If you truly believe that championship teams are not built via the highest payroll how can you defend a GM that consistently outspends every other team?

    8. MJ Recanati
      June 3rd, 2013 | 11:24 am

      LMJ229 wrote:

      If this philosophy has been proven patently false, then why are all of the Yankee teams consistently built on spending?

      Because until the recent changes to the CBA and the sudden infusion of cash that other teams have received through renegotiated media rights deals, that was an advantage that the Yankees had over nearly every other team in the game. Why would the Yankees not use such an advantage for as long as it was available to them?

      LMJ229 wrote:

      And isn’t that exactly how we won the World Series in 2009 – the only World Series fully attributable to Cashman?

      The Yankees had as much money coming off the books in 2008 as they added in 2009. To argue that the 2009 World Series was purely about spending misses the point. It was about replacing outgoing players — Giambi, Mussina, Pavano, Abreu — with new ones.

    9. Raf
      June 3rd, 2013 | 11:31 am

      @ LMJ229:
      If this philosphy is true, why haven’t the teams mentioned by Greg H. won more?

    10. LMJ229
      June 3rd, 2013 | 2:06 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Why would the Yankees not use such an advantage for as long as it was available to them?

      They should certainly use every advantage available to them. But I think that’s the point people are trying to make who believe that the Yankees spending should equate to championships. If the Yankees have the “advantage” shouldn’t they win more than the lesser, disadvantaged teams?
      Raf wrote:

      @ LMJ229:
      If this philosphy is true, why haven’t the teams mentioned by Greg H. won more?

      Because it isn’t true. But it’s the philosophy the Yankees have always subscribed to as you well know.

    11. MJ Recanati
      June 3rd, 2013 | 2:31 pm

      LMJ229 wrote:

      But I think that’s the point people are trying to make who believe that the Yankees spending should equate to championships. If the Yankees have the “advantage” shouldn’t they win more than the lesser, disadvantaged teams?

      LMJ229 wrote:

      Because it isn’t true.

      You not only answered your own question, you pointed out why the “people…who believe that the Yankees spending should equate to championships” don’t really understand the issue.

      I guess I don’t really understand what your point is. The Yankees have been spending since the day the Steinbrenner family took over the team in 1973. Until recently, the system was designed to encourage that kind of spending (or if not encourage, not offer much beyond token resistance against it). The Yankees have been spectacularly successful as a free-spending team, far more successful than other teams that spent lavishly. You can’t guarantee World Series success by spending, especially now that the playoffs have expanded and the regular season is becoming more meaningless.

    12. LMJ229
      June 3rd, 2013 | 3:20 pm

      @ MJ Recanati:
      Just so you know where I am coming from, I don’t subscribe to the theory that spending = championships. However, it seems to me that the Yankees do subscribe to this philosophy as evidenced by their payroll figures year in and year out. I think it makes them irresponsible in a way. It does not force them to develop players from within. They are always looking outside the organization to fill holes.

    13. Evan3457
      June 3rd, 2013 | 3:20 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      E
      Less “moronic” than crediting Cashman with three world championships from 1998-2000 for which he has three rings. The “point” is that rings are not awarded for division titles, they are awarded for pennants and world championships.

      I’m not giving Cashman sole credit for 1998-2000. Nobody here is, I think. Next.

      And since John Cashman’s son “wrested” his almost complete “control of the universe” in 2005, there has been only one such ceremony in The Bronx.

      Actually, he hasn’t had complete control since 2007, when Hank re-signed A-Rod over his head, and in the 2010-11 off-season, when Levine and co. shoved Soriano in over Cashman’s objections. Next.

      What’s laughable on its face is calling one pennant and one world championship in nine years with $200-30 mil. spent each season and an interminable game of musical chairs in the front end of the rotation “spectacular success.”

      I don’t think I’ve ever called Cashman’s record a “spectacular success”. Nice straw man, though. Next.

      Oh, and name the team that doesn’t turn over the front end of its rotation every 3 or 4 years at the latest. The Braves of the mid-late 90’s and early 00’s are the only one.

    14. Evan3457
      June 3rd, 2013 | 3:22 pm

      LMJ229 wrote:

      Raf wrote:

      Yeah, let’s not act like the Yankees weren’t spending before that;
      http://www.nytimes.com/1995/12/31/sports/notebook-budget-what-yankees-budget.html

      While it may be true that the Yankees have always outspent every other ML team, I believe the gap between them and the rest of the league has been consistently larger than years past during Cashman’s reign.

      Yes it is. Keeping Bernie, Jeter, Posada, Pettitte and Mariano around costs lots of money. So does signing 7-8 year free agents, which is what the market was for CC, Tex, A-Rod and Giambi.

    15. MJ Recanati
      June 3rd, 2013 | 3:27 pm

      LMJ229 wrote:

      However, it seems to me that the Yankees do subscribe to this philosophy as evidenced by their payroll figures year in and year out.

      I don’t think they equate spending to World Championships (though George was foolish enough to believe that one guaranteed the other). I think they equate spending to good business in terms of helping them build the YES brand which also helped finance the new stadium. Alos, obviously, spending helped keep the team competitive on an annual basis. It’s a lot easier to avoid the down years if you can maintain a healthy enough payroll but, as we’ve seen with other teams that spent lavishly, that doesn’t guarantee anything. Again, we’ve seen plenty of teams spend in the off-season and fail to even qualify for the playoffs. The Yankees have managed to avoid those kinds of seasons which tells me that they must be doing something right if so many other teams that spend heavily can’t even do that.

    16. MJ Recanati
      June 3rd, 2013 | 3:28 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      So does signing 7-8 year free agents, which is what the market was for CC, Tex, A-Rod and Giambi.

      Mussina too.

    17. Ricketson
      June 5th, 2013 | 8:13 pm

      Greg H. wrote:

      The most common thread is the old “the more you spend, the better the team should be,” and if you spend the most, and your team doesn’t win a world series, then the GM is an idiot.

      The more money a franchise spends on payroll, the better the team should be. Please quote the individual that posted a statement(s) maintaining that if a franchise spends the most money on payroll for a given year, and does not win a World Series, the G.M. of that franchise is therefore an idiot; please provide the quote or a specific reference to the post(s).
      Greg H. wrote:

      The second most ridiculous premise is the idea that “nothing matters except world series rings.

      Once again, please prove a specific reference to a post in which a commenter has maintained that nothing matters (e.g. an A.L. pennant) except a world championship.
      Greg H. wrote:

      No one here is contending that Cashman is the best GM. But he is not a bad GM, and he’s not an idiot. By any objective measure, he’s in the top third.

      Can you provide us with something of a more detailed explanation as to how you place this idiot amongst the top third of G.M.s in M.L.B.?Greg H. wrote:

      But most importantly, his teams usually make the playoffs, which says to me that he gives the team a chance to win it all every year. When fans take that for granted, that’s acting spoiled.

      A team that wins a division title and a team capable of winning a world championship are not necessarily the same. Fans expect the team to win more than one pennant in nine years when the organization outspends all other franchises by tens-of-millions, and in some cases hundreds-of-millions of dollars in each season – that is a reasonable expectation. If an organization is incompetent and fails to do so, fans have a right to express their discontent.

    18. Mr. October
      June 5th, 2013 | 8:20 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      I’m not giving Cashman sole credit for 1998-2000. Nobody here is, I think. Next.

      Some here have seemingly tried to.
      Evan3457 wrote:

      Actually, he hasn’t had complete control since 2007, when Hank re-signed A-Rod over his head, and in the 2010-11 off-season, when Levine and co. shoved Soriano in over Cashman’s objections. Next.

      Actually, I wrote “almost.”

    19. Ricketson
      June 5th, 2013 | 8:38 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      I don’t think I’ve ever called Cashman’s record a “spectacular success”. Nice straw man, though. Next.

      I believe it was Mary Jane that previoulsy referred to Cashman’s record as “spectacularly successful…”
      LMJ229 wrote:

      If this philosophy has been proven patently false, then why are all of the Yankee teams consistently built on spending? And isn’t that exactly how we won the World Series in 2009 – the only World Series fully attributable to Cashman?

      And the only World Series championship team with a payroll in excess of $200 million.
      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Again, we’ve seen plenty of teams spend in the off-season and fail to even qualify for the playoffs. The Yankees have managed to avoid those kinds of seasons which tells me that they must be doing something right if so many other teams that spend heavily can’t even do that.

      Please provide examples of some of these “plenty of teams” that have consistently failed to make the playoffs despite having had some of the highest payrolls in M.L.B. in each season, and continuity in terms of ownership and at the executive management levels.
      The Yankees have managed to avoid pennant-winning seasons in all years since 2005 with the exception of 2009 despite having had the highest payroll in M.L.B. each year by a substantial amount, which tells me they must be doing something wrong.

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