• Bosch Went To MLB After A-Rod Refused To Pay Hush $

    Posted by on June 6th, 2013 · Comments (7)

    Via the Daily News -

    The owner of the South Florida anti-aging clinic at the center of baseball’s latest doping scandal asked embattled Yankee star Alex Rodriguez for financial help after Major League Baseball filed a lawsuit that alleged he had sold performance-enhancing drugs to Major League Baseball players.

    When Rodriguez rebuffed Anthony Bosch’s request for money, believed to be in the hundreds of thousands, the self-styled “biochemist” turned to a strange bedfellow — MLB.

    “A-Rod refused to pay him what he wanted,” said a source. “Baseball was worried about that.”

    MLB reached an agreement this week for Bosch’s cooperation in its long-running investigation into one of the biggest drug scandals in baseball history and plans to meet with him on Friday.

    The Daily News reported Wednesday that baseball was concerned Bosch might turn to players for financial help if MLB didn’t lock him into an agreement to testify.

    “They were afraid someone else would pay him,” said the source. “Bosch is the only guy that can provide them with what they need.”

    Bosch is expected to provide MLB with enough dirt to suspend Rodriguez and nearly two dozen other players, sources familiar with the Biogenesis case have told The News, including Milwaukee Brewers outfielder Ryan Braun, who has had a target on his back since he successfully appealed a positive drug test last year.

    According to one source familiar with the investigation, Bosch and his lawyer, Susy Ribero-Ayala, told MLB that Bosch will provide them with damaging information about his past dealings with A-Rod and Braun, including that he “treated” the Brewers slugger when the player was a student at the University of Miami.

    How crazy is this? A-Rod actually does the right thing and then it works against him in the end. Karma for everything else?

    Comments on Bosch Went To MLB After A-Rod Refused To Pay Hush $

    1. MJ Recanati
      June 6th, 2013 | 8:39 am

      Interesting development. If true, that works both for and against Rodriguez in that his attorneys can paint Bosch as desperate for cash and willing to lie once his attempt at extortion failed.

      Not saying it’s a fair characterization of the situation but it would certainly be a plausible argument for Rodriguez’s team to use against Bosch, especially if they think they can go the Clemens/McNamee route and sue Bosch for libel and defamation.

    2. Evan3457
      June 6th, 2013 | 12:17 pm

      If A-Rod were smart, he wouldn’t have waited for Bosch to come to him, he would have given him money through one or more intermediaries.

      As I told you, nothing would happen to A-Rod unless Bosch ratted him out.

    3. Mr. October
      June 6th, 2013 | 12:47 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      If A-Rod were smart…

      Which, of course, he isn’t…

    4. LMJ229
      June 6th, 2013 | 1:11 pm

      I would think A-Rod was more concerned with getting caught paying off Bosch than “doing the right thing”.

    5. MJ Recanati
      June 6th, 2013 | 2:10 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      If A-Rod were smart, he wouldn’t have waited for Bosch to come to him, he would have given him money through one or more intermediaries.

      Problem is, with MLB threatening a lawsuit against Bosch, A-Rod’s hush money would’ve been a bottomless pit of payoffs. One could argue that Rodriguez not proactively paying Bosch off allows him to make the argument that Bosch is a compromised witness with a low degree of credibility AND avoids having to subsidize the entirety of Bosch’s legal defense.

    6. MJ Recanati
      June 6th, 2013 | 2:12 pm

      LMJ229 wrote:

      I would think A-Rod was more concerned with getting caught paying off Bosch than “doing the right thing”.

      Perhaps this isn’t about “doing the right thing” and is instead a more long-term strategy of self-interest.

      Any payoffs going from Rodriguez to Bosch would’ve been discovered which would’ve made Rodriguez look complicit in a cover-up. As the saying goes, the cover-up is almost always worse than the crime itself.

    7. Zero PSI
      June 6th, 2013 | 3:39 pm

      I’m struggling to understand how MLB is going to make the case that an alleged extortionist and alleged drug dealer has enough credibility to cause them to suspend 20 players. He better have physical evidence beyond some handwritten memos. Or there better be another witness that corroborates his story.

      This isn’t he said vs. he said where somebody – an arbitrator – will have to decide which witness is more credible. Unless one of the players admits guilt this is going to be 20 players saying this didn’t happen against the word of Mr. Bosch.

      Maybe I’m naive but I think it’s a bit soon to be discussing the impact of the a suspension on Arod’s career – particularly a 100 game suspension. The union can’t possibly roll over on that point, can it?

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.