• Brett Gardner & Robbie Cano Have 32 XBH This Season

    Posted by on July 1st, 2013 · Comments (9)

    Gritty, gutty…and the Yankees best slugger?

    Rk Player XBH Year Age G PA R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO GDP SB BA OBP SLG
    1 Brett Gardner 32 2013 29 81 346 45 89 20 5 7 31 28 70 5 11 .286 .346 .450
    2 Robinson Cano 32 2013 30 81 349 44 88 15 0 17 48 36 49 11 5 .287 .364 .502
    3 Lyle Overbay 28 2013 36 72 258 24 58 18 1 9 34 14 56 9 0 .240 .280 .434
    4 Vernon Wells 18 2013 34 75 286 29 60 8 0 10 31 15 47 5 4 .223 .262 .364
    5 Travis Hafner 18 2013 36 63 231 27 45 5 1 12 35 27 60 2 2 .223 .320 .436
    6 Ichiro Suzuki 14 2013 39 75 286 27 72 7 2 5 18 15 30 5 12 .270 .307 .367
    7 Jayson Nix 10 2013 30 72 263 23 55 7 1 2 20 21 69 3 11 .237 .305 .302
    8 Kevin Youkilis 9 2013 34 28 118 12 23 7 0 2 8 8 31 4 0 .219 .305 .343
    9 Brennan Boesch 6 2013 28 23 53 6 14 2 1 3 8 2 9 2 0 .275 .302 .529
    10 Francisco Cervelli 6 2013 27 17 61 12 14 3 0 3 8 8 9 1 0 .269 .377 .500
    11 Eduardo Nunez 5 2013 26 27 95 9 16 4 1 0 4 8 16 0 2 .200 .290 .275
    12 Chris Stewart 5 2013 31 51 160 16 36 2 0 3 11 13 25 6 3 .259 .325 .338
    13 David Adams 5 2013 26 31 112 7 19 3 0 2 9 7 29 3 0 .186 .252 .275
    14 Zoilo Almonte 4 2013 24 11 37 3 10 3 0 1 5 3 6 0 2 .303 .351 .485
    15 Mark Teixeira 4 2013 33 15 63 5 8 1 0 3 12 8 19 1 0 .151 .270 .340
    16 Austin Romine 3 2013 24 29 65 6 9 3 0 0 2 0 17 4 1 .145 .159 .194
    17 Curtis Granderson 2 2013 32 8 31 5 7 1 0 1 1 2 6 1 1 .250 .323 .393
    18 Chris Nelson 2 2013 27 10 37 3 8 2 0 0 2 1 11 3 0 .222 .243 .278
    19 Reid Brignac 1 2013 27 17 45 1 5 1 0 0 0 1 17 3 0 .114 .133 .136
    20 Ben Francisco 1 2013 31 21 50 4 5 0 0 1 1 5 11 0 0 .114 .220 .182
    21 Corban Joseph 1 2013 24 2 7 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 .167 .286 .333
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 7/1/2013.

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    Comments on Brett Gardner & Robbie Cano Have 32 XBH This Season

    1. EHawk
      July 1st, 2013 | 10:32 am

      Interesting stat with Gardner is his Strikeouts! He’s at team high 70 K’s already…which at this pace he will smash his career high of 101. Not a stat you like to see from your lead off hitter. Besides that he is having a solid season.

    2. July 1st, 2013 | 11:28 am

      Stat-heads will tell you that a strikeout is no different than any other kind of out. (I don’t agree – but, that’s what they say.)

    3. EHawk
      July 1st, 2013 | 12:08 pm

      Not true at all…its the least productive out you can make…unless you hit into a DP. I mean how can a strikeout be the same as if you got 2nd and 3rd with no outs and hit a grounder to the right side to bring in a run? With a K no one advances. You never like to see your lead off guy strike out a ton but Gardner does a decent job and seeing a lot of pitches. Maybe he is just making up for Granderson while he’s out!

    4. July 1st, 2013 | 12:23 pm

      EHawk wrote:

      Maybe he is just making up for Granderson while he’s out!

      LOL

    5. Evan3457
      July 1st, 2013 | 12:40 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      Stat-heads will tell you that a strikeout is no different than any other kind of out. (I don’t agree – but, that’s what they say.)

      They’re not. On average, 100 K’s costs a team about 2 runs vs. 100 outs of other kinds. That seems low, but 100 K’s don’t include about 3 GIDP per 100 outs made, and GIDP are really run-killers. Also most flyouts don’t move any runners, and almost no pop outs move runners as well. Line drive outs on the infield also move no runners, although a tiny fraction account for line drive double plays as well.

    6. Evan3457
      July 1st, 2013 | 12:40 pm

      Oh, also OOB (outs on base), especially caught stealing, are far more detrimental than K’s, because they not only cost an out, but also cost a runner on base.

    7. July 1st, 2013 | 12:55 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      On average, 100 K’s costs a team about 2 runs vs. 100 outs of other kinds.

      Run Expectancy tables disagree.

    8. MJ Recanati
      July 1st, 2013 | 1:16 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      un Expectancy tables disagree.

      Looks to me like an out costs 0.603 runs when going from runners on 2nd/3rd with zero outs to runners on 2nd/3rd and one out.

      http://beyondthescorecard.blogspot.com/2013/04/tom-tangos-run-expectancies.html

    9. Evan3457
      July 1st, 2013 | 3:47 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      On average, 100 K’s costs a team about 2 runs vs. 100 outs of other kinds.
      Run Expectancy tables disagree.

      Not quite on point. For example: with bases empty, no difference between a K and any other type of out. And bases empty takes up about 55% of all plate appearances. Only a small percentage of outs with runner on first only result in the runner moving up. All of those are grounders with the runner moving, or difficult groundball plays, or an extremely rare very deep flyball tag up and move to 2nd. That’s another 15000 PA this year, or about 16% of plate appearances. Finally, almost no outs made with runners in scoring position and two outs result in any runs being scored. That’s another 7000 PA this season, or about.

      Adding it all up (based on this seasons’ stats) over 75% of outs are made in situations where the type of out (K or non-K) makes no difference at all.

      The study whose result I cited is not based on run expectancy tables, but matched sets of teams who have similar stats other than K’s. 100 more outs as K’s compared to other outs results in an average loss of two runs.

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