• And, Yet, It’s A Game That No Yankees Fan Wants To Talk About The Day After…

    Posted by on July 31st, 2013 · Comments (12)

    Comments on And, Yet, It’s A Game That No Yankees Fan Wants To Talk About The Day After…

    1. 77yankees
      July 31st, 2013 | 8:22 pm

      Maybe because Joey LaRussa decided to pitch his 3rd or 4th best bullpen arm in the 9th inning when he has the greatest reliever ever out there.

      Again, who came up with this thesis of saving your closer on the road of a tie game? For what, a save situation that didn’t occur? Kind of like going to an auction with a million dollar checkbook and coming home with nothing.

    2. Raf
      July 31st, 2013 | 8:25 pm

      77yankees wrote:

      Maybe because Joey LaRussa decided to pitch his 3rd or 4th best bullpen arm in the 9th inning when he has the greatest reliever ever out there.

      While maddening, it seems to be accepted practice.

    3. MJ Recanati
      August 1st, 2013 | 8:54 am

      Raf wrote:

      While maddening, it seems to be accepted practice.

      Which, 10 years later, really reinforces Beane’s view that managers are essentially worthless. The “good” ones may not cost you as many games as the bad ones do but, in the end, they’re all stuck following one another in the same well-trod rut of conventional managing.

      It amazes me that even the so-called greats like Joe Maddon, Mike Scioscia, or Tony La Russa couldn’t summon up the courage to deploy their closers in high-leverage spots or on the road, etc.

    4. 77yankees
      August 1st, 2013 | 9:24 pm

      Today’s managers have become weaned to preserving their closers for save situations. When the game is tied in the 9th inning, the home manager will put his closer in, but the visiting manager will not. Doesn’t make sense.

      Never used to be that way. Know how you can tell? By the number of wins closers used to get. Sparky had 13 in his Cy Young award year of 1977. Goose had 10 wins (and 11 losses) the following year. Rags had 12 in 1985.

      I can’t remember the last pure MLB reliever to get double digit wins in a season. Anyone know?

    5. Kamieniecki
      August 1st, 2013 | 10:05 pm

      77yankees wrote:

      Never used to be that way. Know how you can tell? By the number of wins closers used to get. Sparky had 13 in his Cy Young award year of 1977. Goose had 10 wins (and 11 losses) the following year.

      Isn’t that because closers used to throw more than 1 inning fairly often? Lyle and Gossage had 137 and 143 IP in ’77 and ’78, respectively. Rivera hasn’t thrown more than 80.2 inn. since ’96.

    6. August 1st, 2013 | 10:11 pm

      77yankees wrote:

      I can’t remember the last pure MLB reliever to get double digit wins in a season. Anyone know?

      Matt Belisle in 2011 and Tyler Clippard in 2010.

    7. August 1st, 2013 | 10:12 pm

      last one to get more than 12 was Mark Eichhorn in 1986

    8. Kamieniecki
      August 1st, 2013 | 10:16 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Which, 10 years later, really reinforces Beane’s view that managers are essentially worthless.

      That would explain how the Yankees won 4 Series with Torre.

    9. Raf
      August 1st, 2013 | 10:39 pm

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      Isn’t that because closers used to throw more than 1 inning fairly often?

      That’s right.

      I think Tony LaRussa is credited with developing the modern closer with Dennis Eckersley, but I think even he threw more than one inning on occasion.

      Rivera hasn’t thrown more than 80.2 inn. since ’96.

      And even he has had 1+ inning saves, though Torre and Girardi usually saved those extended outings for the playoffs.

    10. MJ Recanati
      August 2nd, 2013 | 9:32 am

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      That would explain how the Yankees won 4 Series with Torre.

      LOL, I’m not sure I see Torre’s hand in those World Series titles as much as the narrative suggests.

    11. Kamieniecki
      August 2nd, 2013 | 1:32 pm

      Raf wrote:

      I think Tony LaRussa is credited with developing the modern closer with Dennis Eckersley, but I think even he threw more than one inning on occasion.

      He was. I think all closers since Eckersley have thrown more than one inning on occasion. La Russa was a great manager who would have employed use of a closer on the road and in a tie game if and when it made sense.

    12. Kamieniecki
      August 3rd, 2013 | 9:03 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      I’m not sure I see Torre’s hand in those World Series titles as much as the narrative suggests.

      I’m not sure I see Cashman’s hand in those World Series titles as mucb as some narratives suggest either.

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