• Jack Clark Fingers Albert Pujols, Justin Verlander & Shawn Green

    Posted by on August 9th, 2013 · Comments (17)

    Crazy, or, not so crazy?

    Comments on Jack Clark Fingers Albert Pujols, Justin Verlander & Shawn Green

    1. PHMDen
      August 9th, 2013 | 1:16 pm

      “Jack The Ripper” is great. No surprise suspicions of Pujols can be substantiated or confirmed, or that Verlander is believed to have juiced; I don’t have a lot of familiarity with Green.

      “Dale Murphy can’t get into the Hall of Fame, a quality guy and a great player and an MVP. He has to take a back seat to these creeps and lowlifes like (Mark) McGwire. It just makes me sick and I just can’t be a part of that anymore.”

      Beautiful.

    2. Mr. October
      August 9th, 2013 | 2:57 pm

      PHMDen wrote:

      “Jack The Ripper”

      He’s still “Jack The Ripper” in his new occupation, only in a different sense.

    3. OldYanksFan
      August 9th, 2013 | 4:40 pm

      Maybe Jack is mistaken, but I believe him. I kinda believed Canseco when he first came out with ‘Juiced’, and now it turns out that just about everything he said was true (including ARod juicing).

      The bottom line is that public people have little motivation to lie. They are in the public eye, and can be openly challenged. If they do lie, they will be called out on it. And there is always a little threat of liable.

      Meanwhile, players have every reason to lie. Is there a single player (while active) who admitted to using BEFORE they were caught? Little Giambi and Ken Caminiti spoke up when retired.

      I now feel it I believe every public accusation, I’ll probably be at least correct 75% of the time.

      Take a look at Green’s BRef. Anything look odd there?

    4. Tuttle
      August 9th, 2013 | 5:17 pm

      OldYanksFan wrote:

      Take a look at Green’s BRef. Anything look odd there?

      Not at all:

      1997: Age: 24; 135 G.; .287 AVG./ 15 HRs/ 063 RBIs; Salary: $00500000.00
      1999: Age: 25; 153 G.; .309 AVG./ 42 HRs/ 123 RBIs; Salary: $03125000.00
      2001: Age: 26; 161 G.; .297 AVG./ 49 HRs/ 125 RBIs; Salary: $12166667.00
      2003: Age: 27; 160 G.; .280 AVG./ 19 HRs/ 085 RBIs; Salary: $15666667.00
      2005: Age: 28; 158 G.; .286 AVG./ 22 HRs/ 073 RBIs; Salary: $07833333.00

      I don’t see anything odd. And even if there is something odd, try telling that to some idiot that says there’s nothing wrong with cheating in sports, professional or otherwise. Or it’s not cheating because they did not do anything that violated the code of rules for playing games. Or it’s cheating, but it’s not to be treated as cheating because MLB should have handled the problem differently or managed it better, or others cheated.

    5. Tuttle
      August 9th, 2013 | 5:21 pm

      Correction:
      1997: Age: 24; 135 G.; .287 AVG./ 16 HRs/ 053 RBIs; Salary: $00500000.00
      1999: Age: 26; 153 G.; .309 AVG./ 42 HRs/ 123 RBIs; Salary: $03125000.00
      2001: Age: 28; 161 G.; .297 AVG./ 49 HRs/ 125 RBIs; Salary: $12166667.00
      2003: Age: 30; 160 G.; .280 AVG./ 19 HRs/ 085 RBIs; Salary: $15666667.00
      2005: Age: 32; 158 G.; .286 AVG./ 22 HRs/ 073 RBIs; Salary: $07833333.00

    6. Tuttle
      August 9th, 2013 | 5:27 pm

      More on this:
      “Albert Pujols’ former trainer says he didn’t tell former St. Louis Cardinals slugger Jack Clark that Pujols took performance-enhancing drugs…
      Clark made the accusations on his radio show in St. Louis. Reached by ESPN.com’s T.J. Quinn on Friday, former trainer Chris Mihlfeld said: ‘I haven’t even talked to Jack Clark in close to 10 years. His statements are simply not true. I have known Albert Pujols since he was 18 years old, and he would never use illegal drugs in any way. I would bet my life on it and probably drop dead on the spot if I found out he has. As before, once again both Albert and myself have been accused of doing something we didn’t do.’”

      I believe Clark.

    7. Raf
      August 9th, 2013 | 6:28 pm

      “Cheating is baseball’s oldest profession. No other game is so rich in skullduggery, so suited to it or so proud of it.” – Thomas Boswell

    8. Ricketson
      August 9th, 2013 | 6:35 pm

      Tuttle wrote:

      And even if there is something odd, try telling that to some idiot that says there’s nothing wrong with cheating in sports, professional or otherwise. Or it’s not cheating because they did not do anything that violated the code of rules for playing games. Or it’s cheating, but it’s not to be treated as cheating because MLB should have handled the problem differently or managed it better, or others cheated.

      Raf wrote:

      “Cheating is baseball’s oldest profession. No other game is so rich in skullduggery, so suited to it or so proud of it.” – Thomas Boswell

      @ Tuttle:
      I see your point…

    9. Evan3457
      August 9th, 2013 | 7:00 pm

      I will say this for the steroid cheaters, as opposed to the fixers and gamblers, when they cheat for their own ends, they’re improving their performance, which, wittingly or not, means that they’re also helping their own team win, at least in the short term, before they sign huge long-term deals and their bodies break down.

    10. Ricketson
      August 9th, 2013 | 7:17 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      I will say this for the steroid cheaters, as opposed to the fixers and gamblers, when they cheat for their own ends, they’re improving their performance, which, wittingly or not, means that they’re also helping their own team win, at least in the short term, before they sign huge long-term deals and their bodies break down.

      Nonsense. You’re supposed to be a baseball fan since the 1960s. And despite the fact you remind me of Felix Unger, you’re too knowledgable about the game and have too much of an appreciation of its rich history and traditions to hold an opinion that the use of PEDs can be condoned in any way.

    11. Evan3457
      August 10th, 2013 | 2:48 am

      Ricketson wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      I will say this for the steroid cheaters, as opposed to the fixers and gamblers, when they cheat for their own ends, they’re improving their performance, which, wittingly or not, means that they’re also helping their own team win, at least in the short term, before they sign huge long-term deals and their bodies break down.
      Nonsense. You’re supposed to be a baseball fan since the 1960s. And despite the fact you remind me of Felix Unger, you’re too knowledgable about the game and have too much of an appreciation of its rich history and traditions to hold an opinion that the use of PEDs can be condoned in any way.

      Once again, you’re reading things into what I’ve said that aren’t there. I’m not condoning it. If MLB can prove A-Rod did everything they say he did, then his suspension is pretty much right on the nose, and I hope the arbitrator upholds it. Not just because it would help the Yankees next year, but because if what A-Rod is accused of doing is true, it’s a direct assault on the JDA, and covering up, lying about and getting others to do PEDS is a much more serious set of actions than merely using PEDs.

      The point I was trying to make was this: compared to the Black Sox, and the other players banned for attempting to fix games, or those who bet against, or even on their own teams, such as Pete Rose, the use of PEDs is not as direct a challenge to the integrity of the game. It IS a direct challenge to the integrity of the record book, but that’s not the game per se. It IS a direct challenge to the integrity of the Hall of Fame, but that’s also not the game, per se. (Besides, that one goes out the window the moment the first player not known or suspected as a steroid user comes out and admits it. There would then be no rationale for keeping the rest of the “cheaters” out. Gaylord Perry already deflowered the virgin once. A second deflowering and it’s all over.)

      It is well-known that amphetamine use, which is also illegal, and also now banned under the basic agreement, was in common use in clubhouses as far back as at least the 60′s. Just re-read Ball Four. Now, maybe Roger Maris was too much of a boy scout to need or want to use “greenies” or “dexi-coffee”, but if you think Mickey Mantle never used those to get over his myriad hangovers so he could play as often as he managed despite his injuries…well, I’m sorry; that stretches credulity beyond the breaking point.

    12. Ricketson
      August 10th, 2013 | 11:45 am

      Ricketson wrote:

      Felix Unger

      I meant Frank Burns.
      Evan3457 wrote:

      I’m not condoning it… The point I was trying to make was this: compared to… players banned for attempting to fix games, or those who bet against, or even on their own teams… the use of PEDs is not as direct a challenge to the integrity of the game. It IS a direct challenge to the integrity of the record book, but that’s not the game per se. It IS a direct challenge to the integrity of the Hall of Fame, but that’s also not the game, per se. (Besides, that one goes out the window the moment the first player not known or suspected as a steroid user comes out and admits it. There would then be no rationale for keeping the rest of the “cheaters” out. Gaylord Perry already deflowered the virgin once. A second deflowering and it’s all over.)
      It is well-known that amphetamine use… in common use in clubhouses [in] the 60′s…

      You’re condoning it to a extent.

      “Besides, that one goes out the window the moment the first player not known or suspected as a steroid user comes out and admits it. There would then be no rationale for keeping the rest of the “cheaters” out.”

      Ridiculous. There would be a rationale for removal of that person from the H.O.F. And more ridiculous to compare Perry to Bonds; Or “Pud” Galvin.

    13. Evan3457
      August 10th, 2013 | 12:56 pm

      Ricketson wrote:

      “Besides, that one goes out the window the moment the first player not known or suspected as a steroid user comes out and admits it. There would then be no rationale for keeping the rest of the “cheaters” out.”
      Ridiculous. There would be a rationale for removal of that person from the H.O.F. And more ridiculous to compare Perry to Bonds; Or “Pud” Galvin.

      The Hall has no expulsion mechanism; once a player is in there, he’s in there to stay.

      You’re right; Perry got away with it, and is well-liked, nobody shuns him, but he cheated for a large part of his career. Bonds, not so much.

    14. Ricketson
      August 10th, 2013 | 1:29 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      The Hall has no expulsion mechanism; once a player is in there, he’s in there to stay.
      You’re right; Perry got away with it, and is well-liked, nobody shuns him, but he cheated for a large part of his career. Bonds, not so much.

      Wrong again, Aristotle3457.

    15. Evan3457
      August 10th, 2013 | 2:04 pm

      Ricketson wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      The Hall has no expulsion mechanism; once a player is in there, he’s in there to stay.
      You’re right; Perry got away with it, and is well-liked, nobody shuns him, but he cheated for a large part of his career. Bonds, not so much.
      Wrong again, Aristotle3457.

      Yawn.

    16. 77yankees
      August 10th, 2013 | 7:57 pm

      So now Jack Clark, who took more called third strikes in one season than any Yankee I can ever recall, has gone down swinging this time: No job, and he’s going to get sued.

      http://sports.yahoo.com/news/clark-co-host-fired-radio-153046008–mlb.html

    17. Mr. October
      October 14th, 2013 | 7:02 pm

      Jack Clark wants double PED polygraph with Albert Pujols

      “Someone is lying. And Jack Clark is ready to prove it’s not him.

      Clark, the former Cardinal who recently was sued for defamation for accusing Albert Pujols of using steroids, is willing to take a lie-detector test if Pujols does as well, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

      Clark’s lawyer sent a letter to Pujols’ legal team on Monday making the offer…”

      http://nypost.com/2013/10/14/jack-clark-wants-double-ped-polygraph-with-albert-pujols/

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