• The Thin-Skinned GM Strikes Again

    Posted by on August 28th, 2013 · Comments (18)

    How many other baseball GMs really give a bleep about what some beat writer says in a blog?

    Comments on The Thin-Skinned GM Strikes Again

    1. Kamieniecki
      August 28th, 2013 | 4:20 pm

      How many other baseball GMs find it necessary to voice their objection to a move by ownership in an effort to improve an offense 14th in a league publicly, or are overruled in such a trade under the circumstances to begin with?

      If he kept his mouth shut, like every other professional GM would have, there’s no reason to read Matthews the riot act or remind people how strictly, “[t]his is what Hal (Steinbrenner) wants, and this is why we are doing it” should be interpreted a month later after the player has 11 HRs and 33 RBIs in 30 games.

    2. Corey
      August 28th, 2013 | 6:20 pm

      @ Kamieniecki:
      So you love the right handed Curtis Granderson and not the left handed version? That makes sense.

    3. Corey
      August 28th, 2013 | 6:20 pm

      Corey wrote:

      So you love the right handed Curtis Granderson and not the left handed version? That makes sense.

      This goes for most people here, sadly.

    4. Kamieniecki
      August 28th, 2013 | 7:25 pm

      @ Corey:
      First, it’s Kurtis Granderson. And seKond, I didn’t say I love the right-handed Kurtis Granderson, although I like him more than the left-handed Kurtis Granderson.

      I said Cashman is more concerned with picking up a right-handed Granderson and the trade working out in the long-term in favor of Epstein, or the right-handed Granderson not working out at all and Black becoming an excellent pitcher.

      If Cashman had a better track record, he might have kept his mouth shut; if he had a better feeling for how the trade would work out, he might have kept his mouth shut; if he had done a better job with $234 million building this team, the trade might not have been necessary. instead, what we read was:

      “This is what Hal wants, and this is why we are doing it… This is not something I’m public beforehand or after the fact…”

      Or “I wasn’t against the Soriano deal, I was against trading Black for Soriano.” Black-for-Soriano WAS the Soriano deal. And now we have this idiot feeling as if he has to remind Matthews he was intelligent enough to have considered Soriano an upgrade over Vernon Wells. Good for him.

      There are still people out there that support this idiot, sadly.

    5. Corey
      August 28th, 2013 | 7:51 pm

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      First, it’s Kurtis Granderson.

      very clever

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      Black-for-Soriano WAS the Soriano deal. And now we have this idiot feeling as if he has to remind Matthews he was intelligent enough to have considered Soriano an upgrade over Vernon Wells.

      this is a bit of an over reaction. I agree with Steve in that it’s shocking to see someone with the title of GM OF the Yankees caring about content in a blog. Aside from that, what he was pointing out wasn’t wrong.

    6. Kamieniecki
      August 28th, 2013 | 8:48 pm

      Corey wrote:

      very clever

      Thanks.
      Corey wrote:

      this is a bit of an over reaction. I agree with Steve in that it’s shocking to see someone with the title of GM OF the Yankees caring about content in a blog.

      @ Corey:
      It’s shocking Hal Steinbrenner has not reigned this individual in somewhat. What was he pointing out? That he thought Soriano would be an improvement over Wells at the time? The guy’s a joke…

    7. LMJ229
      August 28th, 2013 | 9:37 pm

      Brian Cashman:
      “I would say we are in a desperate time. Ownership wants to go for it. I didn’t want to give up a young arm [Corey Black]. But I understand the desperate need we have for offense. And Soriano will help us. The bottom line is this guy makes us better. Did ownership want him? Absolutely, yes. Does he make us better? Absolutely, yes. This is what Hal wants, and this is why we are doing it.”

      Sure sounds like Cashman was not in favor of this deal. He made it clear that “ownership” made the call. Maybe Cashman doesn’t understand the concept of a TRADE. You usually have to give up something of value to get something of value. What did he expect – to get Soriano for a bag of balls?

    8. Mr. October
      August 28th, 2013 | 10:04 pm

      He did trade Mary Bresnan for Louise Meanwell and $83,333.33/month alimony…

    9. Kamieniecki
      August 29th, 2013 | 5:42 pm

      What Matthews wrote:

      “This is what a lot of New York Yankees fans should be saying today: Sorry, Hal Steinbrenner, for criticizing the decision to bring Alfonso Soriano to the Yankees at the trade deadline.

      While we’re at it, GM Brian Cashman might want to offer his apologies as well, after saying publicly that he was against the deal.

      Because now, a little more than a month into his second go-round with the Yankees, Soriano doesn’t just look like a bargain, he looks like a steal.”

    10. Mr. October
      August 29th, 2013 | 8:33 pm

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      This is what a lot of New York Yankees fans should be saying today: Sorry, Hal Steinbrenner, for criticizing the decision to bring Alfonso Soriano to the Yankees at the trade deadline.
      While we’re at it, GM Brian Cashman might want to offer his apologies as well, after saying publicly that he was against the deal.

      Cashman has a point: he didn’t criticize the decision to bring Alfonso Soriano to the Yankees, he criticized the decision to trade Black. But that’s what he had in mind from the beginning: to not be in a position that makes him look bad, no matter how the trade turned out, and to be able to call out a Wallace Matthews on something unfavorable written – which he did, and had the second paragraph removed from the blog. This is what Hal Steinbrenner is paying $3 million/year for: phone calls to a beat writer to parse words about a deal that’s kept the team out of the AL East cellar.

    11. Evan3457
      August 29th, 2013 | 9:50 pm
    12. LMJ229
      August 29th, 2013 | 11:58 pm

      I just don’t get Cashman’s desire to go public to voice his objections to trades/signings. These are organizational decisions. So he was on the losing end of a 2-1 consensus. Get over it and don’t act like a 2-year old throwing a temper tantrum when he doesn’t get his way.

    13. Evan3457
      August 30th, 2013 | 4:08 am

      LMJ229 wrote:

      I just don’t get Cashman’s desire to go public to voice his objections to trades/signings. These are organizational decisions. So he was on the losing end of a 2-1 consensus. Get over it and don’t act like a 2-year old throwing a temper tantrum when he doesn’t get his way.

      In the blog post I cited above, Axisa says a possible reason is that Cashman might formally have taken one stance while in negotiations, and been overruled by those above him in the organization. Therefore, he possibly asked for and got permission from those above to make that public. Obviously, they don’t consider it a firing offense, or he’d have been fired for it.

    14. Mr. October
      August 30th, 2013 | 10:33 am

      As soon as I come across a sentence of the nature of “He’s been the GM of the New York Yankees for a long ass time,” I generally stop reading. The reason Cashman went public is that he’s a less-than-mediocre GM that still has a better reputation than he deserves – and he knows it.

      In that “long ass time,” he had the opportunity to arrive at Jul. 26, 2013 with a team better than 14th in offense in the AL and better than 4th place in the AL East and did not, and it cost the team a very good prospect.

      It was a lot easier to GM teams built by Michael, wasn’t it? If you’re such a great GM, either take your talents elsewhere, or “shut the f*** up.” Let’s see if you can build teams with a better postseason winning pct. than .490 with a lot less money…

    15. August 31st, 2013 | 2:47 pm

      I just want to know in what work situation where people would choose to show up their boss because they didn’t want to make a competing organization’s people feel bad. That is what we are supposed to believe with Brian Cashman.

      P.S. If Cashman really was not against the trade for Alfonso Soriano, then why didn’t he read, in the words of Wallace Matthews, the “riot act” to Joel Sherman a month ago for writing that he opposed the trade?

    16. Evan3457
      August 31st, 2013 | 8:27 pm

      lisaswan wrote:

      I just want to know in what work situation where people would choose to show up their boss because they didn’t want to make a competing organization’s people feel bad. That is what we are supposed to believe with Brian Cashman.

      That’s not what Axisa’s blogpost is saying, entirely. Read it again.

    17. September 1st, 2013 | 7:13 am

      @ Evan3457: Well, that theory doesn’t make any sense, nor is there a scintilla of evidence to back it up.

    18. Mr. October
      September 1st, 2013 | 7:22 pm

      lisaswan wrote:

      I just want to know in what work situation where people would choose to show up their boss because they didn’t want to make a competing organization’s people feel bad.

      @ lisaswan:
      What competing organization’s people did Cashman supposedly not want to make feel bad? That theory doesn’t make any sense.

      lisaswan wrote:

      If Cashman really was not against the trade for Alfonso Soriano, then why didn’t he read, in the words of Wallace Matthews, the “riot act” to Joel Sherman a month ago for writing that he opposed the trade?

      Soriano hadn’t hit 12 HRs and knocked in 35 RBIs in only 33 games a month ago…

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