• THIS, Tells You Everything You Need To Know About Brian Cashman’s Ability To Seed A Farm System

    Posted by on August 30th, 2013 · Comments (65)

    MLB journeyman Ty Wigginton has hit more home runs than the Yankees’ entire 1997-2013 draft portfolio.

    I wonder if the Yankees GM will now start reading Tom Verducci the riot act?

    Comments on THIS, Tells You Everything You Need To Know About Brian Cashman’s Ability To Seed A Farm System

    1. Kamieniecki
      September 4th, 2013 | 7:31 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Of course, the first step in winning a title is to make the playoffs

      Exactly – it’s only a step; nothing more. the ALDS is also only a step; nothing more. It’s like getting Louise Meanwell’s phone number: it’s a step; nothing more.

      The next step is play better than .500 baseball, because the postseason is a tournament of “best of” series – that’s the problem Cashman has: building teams that can play .500 baseball against teams that win the AL Central or AL West. You can’t win a ring playing .500 baseball in the postseason, as you can’t give Louise Meanwell a ring without her phone number.

      Either that, or some of us are supposed to believe that the AL Central or AL West winning teams just happen to “get hot” against Cashman’s teams 6 out of every 7 years.

      We’re supposed to believe that the same guy who was one day putting on a UPS uniform, and the next day earning a $3 million/yr. salary working for his father’s friend, is the same guy who is so unlucky that in 6 out of every 7 years, the his postseason competition “gets hot” just before playing his team.

    2. Mr. October
      September 4th, 2013 | 8:42 pm

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      We’re supposed to believe that the same guy who was one day putting on a UPS uniform, and the next day earning a $3 million/yr. salary working for his father’s friend, is the same guy who is so unlucky that in 6 out of every 7 years, the his postseason competition “gets hot” just before playing his team.

      @ Kamieniecki:
      LOL…

      To me, it seems the entire reasoning behind the position that Cashman’s teams lose in the post-season because other teams get hot boils down to this: the teams that win in the post-season are the teams that get hot in the post-season.

      This is a classic example of post hoc ergo propter hoc.
      @ Evan3457:

    3. Evan3457
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:05 pm

      Sweet Lou wrote:

      The number of pennants won since 2004? 1.
      Starting with a team that came within innings of a pennant in 2004, Cashman’s won only 1 pennant since everyone in the baseball operations department began reporting to him sometime in 2005 – 1 pennant in 9 years with what was essentially a pennant winner to begin with! And how many billions spent?

      Right; exactly, the team that did won all the titles was mostly gone. Congratulations to you; you figured it out.

      You can’t say the team played well in the post-season and things just didn’t go their way – they have a .490 post-season W-L record in over 50 games played in that time.

      Not saying that, either.

      The biggest injury to this team in 2013 has been Cashman’s health.

      Silly, juvenile remark.

    4. Evan3457
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:09 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      And the team’s won only 1 pennant in that decade – what a coincidence! How many pennants did it win from 1996-2001, while winning 75.4% of its postseason games?

      As if such a team can be re-assembled and re-re-assembled at will.

      I just did: a .490 postseason winning percentage over 8 years with all of the billions spent proves just that.

      No, it doesn’t. But we’ve been through all this before.

      What was proven was that St. Louis is just one example of a franchise that has done much better since 2005, and has done so with less than half the money Cashman spent – I wrote nothing about any other franchise.

      Which is why I referred to the other two teams parenthetically. and proving one team has done better doesn’t prove Cashman is “a failure”.

      Anyone who wants to say Cashman has to spend more in the AL East can, but that doesn’t change the fact that he’s spent it on teams that have not been able to win more than 49% of their games AFTER the AL East was decided and against postseason competition over an EIGHT YEAR period – he’s had a lot of time AND a lot of money to spend to get that WPCT over .500 and has FAILED.

      Arbitrary criterion selected by you which proves…not much.

    5. Mr. October
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:09 pm

      rankdog wrote:

      A new GM will magically fix everything right? (last comment was sarcasm)

      Wrong. A new GM will fix everything not with magic, but a modicum of intelligence.

    6. Evan3457
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:23 pm

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      Of course, the first step in winning a title is to make the playoffs
      Exactly – it’s only a step; nothing more. the ALDS is also only a step; nothing more. It’s like getting Louise Meanwell’s phone number: it’s a step; nothing more.

      Meaningless response.

      The next step is play better than .500 baseball, because the postseason is a tournament of “best of” series –

      Thank you, Captain Obvious.

      that’s the problem Cashman has: building teams that can play .500 baseball against teams that win the AL Central or AL West.

      Or, they beat one such team, then lose to another, which has happened in 2 of the 7 years. Or they beat two such teams, on their way to winning against an NL team, which happened once.

      You can’t win a ring playing .500 baseball in the postseason, as you can’t give Louise Meanwell a ring without her phone number.

      Thanks again, Cap’n.

      Either that, or some of us are supposed to believe that the AL Central or AL West winning teams just happen to “get hot” against Cashman’s teams 6 out of every 7 years.

      Or we’re supposed to believe that most years, the post-season isn’t a crapshoot among teams that are close in ability.

      We’re supposed to believe that the same guy who was one day putting on a UPS uniform, and the next day earning a $3 million/yr.

      The next day, or 20 years later with nothing happening in between, same thing.

      salary working for his father’s friend,

      The guy who hired him is the same guy who promoted him several times. Either George was an idiot, too, or George saw something worth promoting and rewarding. Your choice.

      is the same guy who is so unlucky that in 6 out of every 7 years, the his postseason competition “gets hot” just before playing his team.

      …is one way to put it. The other way is that the teams have won 5 of 11 series against teams about as good, most of those years. I mean, it’s not like this every happens to other very good teams over a long stretch of time, like say, the Braves losing 10 of 18 series and winning no titles from 1996 through 2005. No sirree, the Yanks are unique.

    7. Evan3457
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:24 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      Kamieniecki wrote:
      We’re supposed to believe that the same guy who was one day putting on a UPS uniform, and the next day earning a $3 million/yr. salary working for his father’s friend, is the same guy who is so unlucky that in 6 out of every 7 years, the his postseason competition “gets hot” just before playing his team.
      @ Kamieniecki:
      LOL…
      To me, it seems the entire reasoning behind the position that Cashman’s teams lose in the post-season because other teams get hot boils down to this: the teams that win in the post-season are the teams that get hot in the post-season.
      This is a classic example of post hoc ergo propter hoc.
      @ Evan3457:

      Not my argument. It is, however, another straw man.

    8. Evan3457
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:26 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      rankdog wrote:
      A new GM will magically fix everything right? (last comment was sarcasm)
      Wrong. A new GM will fix everything not with magic, but a modicum of intelligence.

      Maybe. Maybe not.

    9. Mr. October
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:36 pm

      @ Evan3457:
      Evan3457 wrote:

      As if such a team can be re-assembled and re-re-assembled at will.

      I’ll settle for re-assembled. How many more years and billions of dollars do you think Cashman might need?

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Arbitrary criterion selected by you which proves…not much.

      @ Evan3457:
      “Arbitrary?” I “selected” that criterion on the basis of Cashman’s own words from an Oct., 2005 press conference…

      8 years proves “not much?” How many more years do we need? The average human life expectancy is only 78.7 years…

    10. Mr. October
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:46 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      [A new GM will fix everything not with magic, but a modicum of intelligence] Maybe. Maybe not.

      @ Evan3457:
      You’re right: it will take more than a modicum of intelligence to clean up the mess Cashman will leave behind…

    11. Kamieniecki
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:59 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      I mean, it’s not like this every happens to other very good teams over a long stretch of time, like say, the Braves losing 10 of 18 series and winning no titles from 1996 through 2005. No sirree, the Yanks are unique.

      @ Evan3457:
      The Braves won 1 world championship and 2 pennants from 1995-2004, losing both Series to Michael’s Yankees. Is there some reason you picked 1996-2005? Did Schuerholz announce in Oct., 1996, “I’m the general manager, and everybody within the baseball operations department reports to me… That’s not how it has operated recently.”

    12. Evan3457
      September 5th, 2013 | 5:06 am

      Mr. October wrote:

      @ Evan3457:
      Evan3457 wrote:
      As if such a team can be re-assembled and re-re-assembled at will.
      I’ll settle for re-assembled. How many more years and billions of dollars do you think Cashman might need?

      Well, considering that such a team might never be assembled again, by anyone, the question’s pretty much moot. Until somebody does it again.
      The competitive conditions of the game have changed dramatically in last 15 years, by design of MLB.

      “Arbitrary?” I “selected” that criterion on the basis of Cashman’s own words from an Oct., 2005 press conference…

      Source, please. I’ll want to take a look at the exact quote.

      8 years proves “not much?” How many more years do we need? The average human life expectancy is only 78.7 years…

      Not really. Most teams go decades without winning it all, during good management and bad. Even the Orioles and Mets have gone without winning it all, despite having had high payrolls for multiple years in a row.

    13. Evan3457
      September 5th, 2013 | 5:11 am

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      The Braves won 1 world championship and 2 pennants from 1995-2004, losing both Series to Michael’s Yankees. Is there some reason you picked 1996-2005? Did Schuerholz announce in Oct., 1996, “I’m the general manager, and everybody within the baseball operations department reports to me… That’s not how it has operated recently.”

      And, as you well know, that autonomy no longer exists, and really, it lasted all of 2 seasons, when Hank apparently overruled Cashman to re-sign Rodriguez. So if you can pick the seasons you want, I’ll pick the seasons I want. Fair’s fair.

      After all, in the two years preceding Cashman’s “autonomy”, teams that were at least half his design won 3 post-season series, and lost 2, won 15 post-season games and lost 13, and won one pennant.

    14. Evan3457
      September 5th, 2013 | 5:12 am

      Mr. October wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      [A new GM will fix everything not with magic, but a modicum of intelligence] Maybe. Maybe not.
      @ Evan3457:
      You’re right: it will take more than a modicum of intelligence to clean up the mess Cashman will leave behind…

      More than likely, it will take a return of the free spending after the 2014 season in the short run, after the luxury tax reset, to return to contention, and in the mid-term run, a little better luck in developing the prospects they do have for contention in the long run.

      Regardless of who winds up being the GM, if not Cashman.

    15. Mr. October
      September 5th, 2013 | 9:37 am

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Well, considering that such a team might never be assembled again, by anyone, the question’s pretty much moot. Until somebody does it again.
      The competitive conditions of the game have changed dramatically in last 15 years, by design of MLB.

      This team is 25-26 in the postseason since 2005 spending $200-30 mil. each year not because of so-called dramatic changes to the competitive environment, or bad luck – it has a .490 postseason winning pct. in 51 postseason games because of bad general management. Period.

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Source, please. I’ll want to take a look at the exact quote.

      Look it up yourself.

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Not really. Most teams go decades without winning it all, during good management and bad. Even the Orioles and Mets have gone without winning it all, despite having had high payrolls for multiple years in a row.

      Cashman can’t be one of the worst GMs in baseball because the Mets have gone without winning it all with high payrolls for multiple years – Excellent point.

      Evan3457 wrote:

      After all, in the two years preceding Cashman’s “autonomy”, teams that were at least half his design won 3 post-season series, and lost 2, won 15 post-season games and lost 13, and won one pennant.

      LOL. That’s 100% correct: since 1998 the team has been in steady decline. From three World Series titles, to two pennants, to nothing from 2004-09 until $423 million was spent on free agents. Four years and zero pennants later, the team is right back where it was in 2008, only now it has a 290 lb. albatross earning $24 mil. per year until 2017 at the front of its rotation, and nothing after him.

      The Sabathia contract is one of the worst in baseball at this point – $96 million committed to a pitcher 33-year old pitcher currently 13-11 with a 4.86 ERA and more innings in his arm than any other pitcher over the last six seasons. Whom are we blaming for the Sabathia contract? Steinbrenner? Trost? Levine?

      “‘CC is the ace of our pitching staff…’ Yankees general manager Brian Cashman said in a statement… ‘We are excited that he will be wearing the pinstripes for many years to come.'”

      Less than two years later:

      “‘That contract might not be a disaster of A-Rod-ian proportions, but unless Sabathia finds a way to turn it all round, it might turn out to be the next-worst thing,…. Sabathia has three years left on his contract, plus a vesting option for 2017 that the Yankees can avoid only if Sabathia has a left shoulder injury. All told, the Yankees are likely to be on the hook for $96MM after this season.”

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