• THIS, Tells You Everything You Need To Know About Brian Cashman’s Ability To Seed A Farm System

    Posted by on August 30th, 2013 · Comments (65)

    MLB journeyman Ty Wigginton has hit more home runs than the Yankees’ entire 1997-2013 draft portfolio.

    I wonder if the Yankees GM will now start reading Tom Verducci the riot act?

    Comments on THIS, Tells You Everything You Need To Know About Brian Cashman’s Ability To Seed A Farm System

    1. Garcia
      August 30th, 2013 | 4:59 pm

      That is insane! Bottom line, I will be surprised if Cashman is the GM of the Yankees on 11/1/2013.

      I really hope Girardi is back, I’ve grown to really like him this year. I just wish he’d stop snorking like a pig when he laughs.

    2. August 30th, 2013 | 5:32 pm

      Girardi is not Maddon or Showalter. But, he’s not the Yankees problem. In fact, look at the Yankees Pythagorean W-L: 66-67

      Girardi has the team performing better than that – with 70 wins.

      I would have no problem with him coming back.

      That said, a new GM is probably going to want his own MGR.

      And, if Girardi is smart, he’ll get out of town after this season.

      If you think this year is bad, next year is going to be worse.

    3. Sweet Lou
      August 30th, 2013 | 8:24 pm

      NYY center fielder Curtis Granderson has more strike outs than the Yankees’ entire 1997-2013 draft portfolio.

    4. EHawk
      August 30th, 2013 | 8:37 pm
    5. Evan3457
      August 30th, 2013 | 9:00 pm

      Sweet Lou wrote:

      NYY center fielder Curtis Granderson has more strike outs than the Yankees’ entire 1997-2013 draft portfolio.

      Not even close.
      In fact Austin Jackson has more K’s than Curtis all by himself, albeit in considerably more PA.

    6. August 30th, 2013 | 9:57 pm

      @ EHawk:
      That was an interesting read. Too bad it only had the word “Cashman” mentioned in it once.

    7. August 30th, 2013 | 10:49 pm

      I think what many of us want is an accounting for the current state of the Yankee on field baseball product. The age on this team is an obscenity, and the minor league system is virtually devoid of major league ready talent. Cashman has to be held accountable for this mess. The Yankees charge among the highest ticket prices, concession prices, parking prices, their cable network (YES) charges $2.99 per subscriber, the highest regional sports network charge in the country. Steve is right, this club is on the verge of collapse. It’s time for Hal to justify to the fans who are paying the highest prices in the country why there is no day of reckoning for the baseball executive responsible for the baseball product.

    8. LMJ229
      August 30th, 2013 | 11:00 pm

      @ Joseph Maloney:
      Well said!

    9. August 31st, 2013 | 8:18 am

      @ LMJ229:
      Ditto.

    10. KPOcala
      August 31st, 2013 | 11:47 am

      I would have thought that the proverbial room full of monkeys, throwing darts would have done as well. Wow.

    11. August 31st, 2013 | 12:13 pm

      @ KPOcala:
      Anyone with a subscription to Baseball America and an IQ of 100 would have done better.

    12. August 31st, 2013 | 3:12 pm

      @ Steve L.: Nick Swisher! (That seems to be the thing Cashman acolytes reflexively shout out when it comes to any criticism of him, so I figured I’d throw it out there, too!)

    13. August 31st, 2013 | 7:19 pm

      @ lisaswan:
      LOL. Soooo true.
      Hey, wasn’t that Youk signing this off-season genius? Yeah, people have forgotten him already.
      That’s the Cashman MO: Heads, he wins. Tails, someone else loses.
      Never his fault.
      Always take the credit for the one or two that actually work out. Sweep the other one hundred that failed under the rug.

    14. Evan3457
      August 31st, 2013 | 8:29 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      @ lisaswan:
      LOL. Soooo true.
      Hey, wasn’t that Youk signing this off-season genius? Yeah, people have forgotten him already.
      That’s the Cashman MO: Heads, he wins. Tails, someone else loses.
      Never his fault.
      Always take the credit for the one or two that actually work out. Sweep the other one hundred that failed under the rug.

      As opposed to acquiring what other thirdbaseman that was out there? Look at the records of all the candidates this year. They’re all terrible.

    15. September 1st, 2013 | 7:19 am

      @ Evan3457: David Adams, the “best” the Yankee farm system had to offer at third, was terrible, but he wasn’t any worse than Youkilis was. And only Brian Cashman would think it was smart to replace a chronically injured third baseman with somebody who spent even more time on the DL in 2012 than A-Rod did, and to pay $12 million for the privilege.

      Incidentally, here’s how the Youkilis Yankeeography shakes out, barring a late-September return:

      $6,000,000 per homer
      $1,500,000 per RBI
      $1,500,000 per walk
      $521,739.13 per hit
      $101,694.92 per at bat
      $42,857.14 per game

    16. Evan3457
      September 1st, 2013 | 10:41 am

      lisaswan wrote:

      @ Evan3457: David Adams, the “best” the Yankee farm system had to offer at third, was terrible, but he wasn’t any worse than Youkilis was. And only Brian Cashman would think it was smart to replace a chronically injured third baseman with somebody who spent even more time on the DL in 2012 than A-Rod did, and to pay $12 million for the privilege.
      Incidentally, here’s how the Youkilis Yankeeography shakes out, barring a late-September return:
      $6,000,000 per homer
      $1,500,000 per RBI
      $1,500,000 per walk
      $521,739.13 per hit
      $101,694.92 per at bat
      $42,857.14 per game

      Actually, A-Rod spent more days on the DL in 2012 than Youkillis did, and that doesn’t include the post-season when A-Rod was incapacitated by the bad left hip. Youkillis played the same number of games as A-Rod in 2012.

      And now, let’s look at the legitimate alternatives…

      Placido Polanco .247/.300/.284; currently helping Marlins to the 2nd worst record in baseball…

      Chase Headley .240/.331/.368 AFTER a hot streak, would’ve cost the Yanks at least two top prospects to acquire to boot…

      Mark Reynolds: hit so poorly the Indians released him. Kevin Long helps him make a simple adjustment and he’s hitting well, at the moment.
      =======================
      Of these players, Reynolds was the only real alternative, but if they signed him, the Yankees would’ve been addressing their offensive shortcomings by signing the player with the highest career K rate in MLB history (for hitters with significant careers).

    17. September 1st, 2013 | 11:06 am

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Mark Reynolds: hit so poorly the Indians released him. Kevin Long helps him make a simple adjustment and he’s hitting well, at the moment.

      Um, sample size on Reynolds, please.
      It’s been 45 PA, for Pete’s sake.
      Besides, remember when the genius Long “fixed” Granderson…that really stuck/worked, right?

    18. Greg H.
      September 1st, 2013 | 11:08 am

      @ EHawk:
      I read this article as well, pretty interesting. Steve’s comment that “Cashman is only mentioned once” is par for the course – for some folks, everything is Cashman’s fault at all times. The idea that the owner is somehow responsible is a novel one.

      I find it pretty amusing that even with all that’s happened this year, and this team may still make the playoffs – people are so pissed at Cashman. Maybe Cashman should go, it wouldn’t bother me either way, but if a shakeup us in order, then it falls on Hal to conduct it properly and he’s ultimately responsible. And that would include the rest of the bozos floating around the big office.

      Steve L. wrote:

      If you think this year is bad, next year is going to be worse.

      I disagree that next year will be terrible, and by terrible I don’t mean “OMFG we might not make the playoffs.” I think the team won’t suck, it will be competitive and we’ll see many new faces making contributions. I look forward to the changes. Boston remade the team last year and is running away with the division. I wouldn’t have guessed it at the beginning of the season, but obviously it’s possible.

    19. September 1st, 2013 | 11:45 am

      @ Evan3457I stand corrected that they played the same amount of games in 2012. But the rest of my point stands — why replace one chronically injured player with someone who is even more chronically injured (Youkilis hasn’t played over 130 games since 2009.)

      Again, why couldn’t the Yankees just gone with David Adams? They ended up having to play him anyway, after the $12 million dollar man’s back started hurting again. (Imagine that — a player with a history of back problems ended up going on the DL because of his back!)

      Oh, and thanks for reminding me about A-Rod’s bad hip — the one where the MRI revealed that he had a tear in the left hip labrum in 2012, yet neither the team nor the medical staff informed him of this fact. Nice going, guys!

    20. September 1st, 2013 | 11:47 am

      Greg H. wrote:

      I find it pretty amusing that even with all that’s happened this year, and this team may still make the playoffs – people are so pissed at Cashman.

      Well, given that two of the main reasons of the Yankees resurgence are due to Alfonso Soriano (Cashman made a stink about not wanting him) and Alex Rodriguez (Cashman made it clear he’s like him to be gone forever), that might be some of the reason Cashman isn’t exactly considered the second coming of Branch Rickey.

    21. Evan3457
      September 1st, 2013 | 12:30 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      Mark Reynolds: hit so poorly the Indians released him. Kevin Long helps him make a simple adjustment and he’s hitting well, at the moment.
      Um, sample size on Reynolds, please.
      It’s been 45 PA, for Pete’s sake.
      Besides, remember when the genius Long “fixed” Granderson…that really stuck/worked, right?

      I wasn’t making a big deal out of this. I don’t think Reynolds is really fixed. The point I was making was that Reynolds was frequently cited in the last off-season as an alternative at 3rd base. He hit so poorly for the Indians that they let him go. I don’t think Long’s “fix” will hold for long; Reynolds is what he is.

    22. Evan3457
      September 1st, 2013 | 12:31 pm

      lisaswan wrote:

      @ Evan3457I stand corrected that they played the same amount of games in 2012. But the rest of my point stands — why replace one chronically injured player with someone who is even more chronically injured (Youkilis hasn’t played over 130 games since 2009.)
      Again, why couldn’t the Yankees just gone with David Adams? They ended up having to play him anyway, after the $12 million dollar man’s back started hurting again. (Imagine that — a player with a history of back problems ended up going on the DL because of his back!)
      Oh, and thanks for reminding me about A-Rod’s bad hip — the one where the MRI revealed that he had a tear in the left hip labrum in 2012, yet neither the team nor the medical staff informed him of this fact. Nice going, guys!

      Assumes the team knew.

    23. Greg H.
      September 1st, 2013 | 12:34 pm

      @ lisaswan:
      I never said Cashman was good or bad. And I’m certainly not attempting to convince you or the other Cashman jury to acquit the guy – that’s a lost cause. My point is that so many are pissed with Cashman, when “as bad as it gets” means your team might not make the playoffs after pretty much the entire lineup was injured. Using every possible circumstance to take a shot at Brian Cashman (or anyone else for that matter) is boooring.

      If it’s time for Cashman to go (and perhaps it is) he should not be the only one in the organization to go. And, either way, next year the team will be competitive.

    24. KPOcala
      September 1st, 2013 | 1:22 pm

      @ Steve L.: Steve, looks like you are right about the Cashman Dynasty. For years I figured that the politics in that “Company” were the cause of problems. And that certainly figures into it… But, you know what Stengel would have said…….

    25. Sweet Lou
      September 1st, 2013 | 3:03 pm

      lisaswan wrote:

      Well, given that two of the main reasons of the Yankees resurgence are due to Alfonso Soriano (Cashman made a stink about not wanting him) and Alex Rodriguez (Cashman made it clear he’s like him to be gone forever), that might be some of the reason Cashman isn’t exactly considered the second coming of Branch Rickey.

      How does Soriano feel being the main reason for this resurgence against the backdrop of the problems with Alex Rodriguez when the same GM: 1. favored a trade of him for none other than Rodriguez in 2004; and 2 opposed a trade for him publicly in 2013?
      Does Cashman have an “uncomfortable relationship” with both Rodriguez and Soriano now, or is it still only with Rodriguez? The more uncomfortable relationships a GM has, the better of course…

    26. September 1st, 2013 | 5:55 pm

      Greg H. wrote:

      If it’s time for Cashman to go (and perhaps it is) he should not be the only one in the organization to go.

      No argument here! Hal Steinbrenner has gone too far in the other direction as his father when it comes to firing people. Like, why does Randy Levine still have a job?

    27. September 1st, 2013 | 5:58 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      lisaswan wrote:
      Assumes the team knew.

      If the team didn’t know, why weren’t they up in arms about not being told? If the team doctor didn’t know, how does he still have a job with the team?

      There was some major league screwup there. And it sure explains why A-Rod doesn’t trust anybody connected with the team anymore when it comes to injury diagnoses.

    28. Sweet Lou
      September 1st, 2013 | 6:19 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Not even close.
      In fact Austin Jackson has more K’s than Curtis all by himself, albeit in considerably more PA.

      Great strike out by Granderson in the 7th inning today, forcing the Oriole reliever to throw a lot of pitches.

    29. Evan3457
      September 1st, 2013 | 6:54 pm

      Sweet Lou wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      Not even close.
      In fact Austin Jackson has more K’s than Curtis all by himself, albeit in considerably more PA.
      Great strike out by Granderson in the 7th inning today, forcing the Oriole reliever to throw a lot of pitches.

      Irrelevant to the point, but thanks for the straw man.

    30. Mr. October
      September 1st, 2013 | 6:57 pm

      lisaswan wrote:

      Again, why couldn’t the Yankees just gone with David Adams? They ended up having to play him anyway, after the $12 million dollar man’s back started hurting again.

      @ lisaswan:
      Nonsense. The team needed a third baseman until Rodriguez was healthy. If the team went with Adams and Youk had a productive year elsewhere with a one-year contract, you could have justifiably criticized the GM for going with Adams with Rodriguez’s health and return date uncertain, and Youkilis having been willing to accept a one-year deal. Keppinger wanted a multi-year deal, Chavez preferred to play in Arizona – Youkilis was the right decision.
      There are a lot of moves you can criticize Cashman for; Youkilis isn’t one of them.

    31. Mr. October
      September 1st, 2013 | 7:01 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Irrelevant to the point, but thanks for the straw man.

      @ Evan3457:
      You’re the King of the Straw Men: “Spending the most money doesn’t guarantee a World Series title” – no one ever said it did.

    32. September 1st, 2013 | 7:20 pm

      Mr. October, I can assure you — I NEVER would have second-guessed Brian Cashman for not signing Youkilis. I was loudly against the signing all along, and I predicted that Youk would be on the DL by Memorial Day. Actually, he was first on the DL a month earlier! And I said at the time that the Yanks should see what Adams can do instead of signing Youkilis.

      And the idea of Youk having a “productive” year anywhere, given his age and track record, makes me chuckle!

    33. Mr. October
      September 1st, 2013 | 7:26 pm

      @ lisaswan:
      Well, if you’re on the record as having been against the signing all along, and predicting Youkilis would be on the DL by Memorial Day, then you certainly got it right, and I can’t argue with you… I was for the Youkilis signing “at the time.”

    34. Evan3457
      September 1st, 2013 | 8:04 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      Irrelevant to the point, but thanks for the straw man.
      @ Evan3457:
      You’re the King of the Straw Men: “Spending the most money doesn’t guarantee a World Series title” – no one ever said it did.

      Rubbish. That’s the very heart of the argument that Cashman is a failure as a GM.

    35. September 1st, 2013 | 10:06 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      lisaswan wrote:Again, why couldn’t the Yankees just gone with David Adams? They ended up having to play him anyway, after the $12 million dollar man’s back started hurting again. @ lisaswan:
      Nonsense. The team needed a third baseman until Rodriguez was healthy. If the team went with Adams and Youk had a productive year elsewhere with a one-year contract, you could have justifiably criticized the GM for going with Adams with Rodriguez’s health and return date uncertain, and Youkilis having been willing to accept a one-year deal. Keppinger wanted a multi-year deal, Chavez preferred to play in Arizona – Youkilis was the right decision.
      There are a lot of moves you can criticize Cashman for; Youkilis isn’t one of them.

      What’s nonsense is the notion that one of the highest paid individuals in the United States of America should not be held accountable for solving the 3rd base problem this team entered 2013 with by investing 12 million dollars in the broken down body of Youkilis. It doesn’t matter what you or I thought of the move at the time, no one is paying us 3 million a year for that opinion. Brian Cashman had no answers in the minor league system, Brian failed to swing any trades to meet the infield needs of the club so his solution was Youkilis. It failed and it cost 12 million! And what’s even more alarming is the need for infielders who can play at the major league level will be even greater next year. How can ownership effectively deal with the implications of the Cano negotiations? The Yankees should be a model organization, and what they have instead is Brian Cashman.

    36. September 1st, 2013 | 10:45 pm

      lisaswan wrote:

      Like, why does Randy Levine still have a job?

      Via the Times back in 2009:

      Levine’s career has been a succession of increasingly public apprenticeships: to Arnold I. Burns, the deputy attorney general in the Reagan Justice Department; to Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani, as the labor commissioner and a deputy mayor; and to Steinbrenner, as a personal lawyer and, since 2000, as the team’s president.

      Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/29/sports/baseball/29levine.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

      As big Stein’s personal lawyer, for all those years, I suspect that Levine has enough dirt on the Steinbrenner family to keep himself employed for years…

    37. September 1st, 2013 | 11:10 pm

      @ Mr. October: Yup! Here is one of my many posts on Youkilis:

      http://subwaysquawkers.blogspot.com/2012/12/youk-yuck-why-yankees-signing-kevin.html

    38. September 1st, 2013 | 11:12 pm

      @ Steve L.: Yep, but at a certain point, don’t they have enough on him? (StubHub, handling of A-Rod situation, etc.?) At any rate, I’m a fan of keeping people in a job a long time *if* they can still excel at the job. Not for any other ancillary reasons!

    39. Mr. October
      September 2nd, 2013 | 1:47 pm

      Joseph Maloney wrote:

      What’s nonsense is the notion that one of the highest paid individuals in the United States of America should not be held accountable for solving the 3rd base problem this team entered 2013 with by investing 12 million dollars in the broken down body of Youkilis.
      It doesn’t matter what you or I thought of the move at the time, no one is paying us 3 million a year for that opinion. Brian Cashman had no answers in the minor league system, Brian failed to swing any trades to meet the infield needs of the club so his solution was Youkilis. It failed and it cost 12 million! And what’s even more alarming is the need for infielders who can play at the major league level will be even greater next year. How can ownership effectively deal with the implications of the Cano negotiations? The Yankees should be a model organization, and what they have instead is Brian Cashman.

      @ Joseph Maloney:
      In a press conference in 2005 Cashman said, “I’m the general manager, and everybody within the baseball operations department reports to me… That’s not how it has operated recently.” “Recently” – that is, from a time recent to Oct., 2005, until Sep., 2013, Cashman’s had the “autonomy of his peers,” and hundreds-of-millions-of-dollars more to spend than those peers, and the organization is in the condition it’s in today.

      In 2005, Posada was 33 years old, and 6 years from retirement, and the catcher in 2013 is Stewart who is hitting .216; in 2012, it was Martin, who hit .211. One of the highest paid individuals in the United States of America should be held accountable for not having a better solution for Posada’s replacement with 6 years to plan for it.

      Since 2005, the team has won only .490 percent of its postseason games, compared to .754 percent of its postseason games from 1996-2000. One of the highest paid individuals in the United States of America should be held accountable for this poor performance with the highest payrolls in MLB history.

      Cashman has failed to swing any trades to meet the team’s infield needs, or otherwise; What trades has the “skilled swordsman” swung in 15+ years worth speaking of?

      What’s even more alarming than the alarming need for infielders is the need for a starting rotation next year and beyond; Sabathia is under contract with an AAV of $24 mil. and a vesting option in 2017; Kuroda will be a free agent and 39 yrs. old; Pettitte will retire for a second or third time; Hughes is Hughes and will be a free agent; and Pineda is more suited for the pen.

      But just for the sake of discussion, and forgetting Cashman was the GM and responsible for the problem at third, the question was who was the best option at third in Feb., 2012?

      lisaswan wrote:

      Yup! Here is one of my many posts on Youkilis:
      http://subwaysquawkers.blogspot.com/2012/12/youk-yuck-why-yankees-signing-kevin.html
      lisaswan

      @ lisaswan:
      I believed you…

    40. Mr. October
      September 2nd, 2013 | 1:57 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Rubbish. That’s the very heart of the argument that Cashman is a failure as a GM.

      @ Evan3457:
      Rubbish.

      The very heart of the argument that Cashman is a failure as a GM is that the team has not won more than 49% of its postseason games since 2005 with the highest payrolls in MLB history each season and in all of those years.

      The very heart of the argument that Cashman is a failure as a GM is not that spending the most money should guarantee a World Series title every year, and Cashman has not won more than 1 World Series title since 2005, therefore he is a failure, as you misrepresent it, your heinous.

    41. Evan3457
      September 2nd, 2013 | 6:02 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      Rubbish. That’s the very heart of the argument that Cashman is a failure as a GM.
      @ Evan3457:
      Rubbish.
      The very heart of the argument that Cashman is a failure as a GM is that the team has not won more than 49% of its postseason games since 2005 with the highest payrolls in MLB history each season and in all of those years.
      The very heart of the argument that Cashman is a failure as a GM is not that spending the most money should guarantee a World Series title every year, and Cashman has not won more than 1 World Series title since 2005, therefore he is a failure, as you misrepresent it, your heinous.

      Nope.

      The common attack on Cashman is that he’s an idiot; the worst GM in the history of MLB.

      The common defense of Cashman is that except for 2008, the Yanks have made the post-season every year of his reign as GM, even though the vast majority of the talent he inherited from Michael/Watson has been gone for over a decade now.

      The common counter of that defense, is that given the money the Yanks have spent in each of those seasons, the Yanks should have won more than 1 pennant and 1 World Series in those 9, going on 10, seasons.

      If this counter is NOT saying that spending all that money should guarantee pennants and World Series titles, it IS saying that it should guarantee more playoff series victories, and because the team has not accomplished that, Cashman is a failure.

      My description of that argument is correct as given, and your calling a mispresentation, much less heinous, is childish.

    42. Mr. October
      September 2nd, 2013 | 7:59 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      @ Evan3457:
      The common attack on Cashman is that he’s an idiot; the worst GM in the history of MLB.

      That’s not an attack – he is an idiot. I don’t recall anyone writing that he’s the worst GM in the history of MLB either, although he might be – thanks for the straw man.

      Evan3457 wrote:

      the vast majority of the talent he inherited from Michael/Watson has been gone for over a decade now.

      Another straw man: the vast majority of that talent was not gone from 1998-2001. Have any of: Jeter, Pettitte, Posada, Rivera, Williams, etc. been gone for over a decade now?

      Evan3457 wrote:

      If this counter is NOT saying that spending all that money should guarantee pennants and World Series titles, it IS saying that it should guarantee more playoff series victories, and because the team has not accomplished that, Cashman is a failure.

      Correct.

      Cashman is a failure given the team’s .500 postseason winning pct. since 2005 and the resources spent in that time, and the current state of the team in 2013.
      If the team’s winning pct. was greater and more postseason series were won, and the current state of the team was better, he wouldn’t be considered the failure he is by most. You finally got it…

      Mr. October wrote:

      You’re the King of the Straw Men: “Spending the most money doesn’t guarantee a World Series title” – no one ever said it did.

      Mr. October wrote:

      The very heart of the argument that Cashman is a failure as a GM is not that spending the most money should guarantee a World Series title every year, and Cashman has not won more than 1 World Series title since 2005, therefore he is a failure, as you misrepresent it, your heinous.

      Evan3457 wrote:

      My description of that argument is correct as given, and your calling a mispresentation, much less heinous, is childish.

      I meant, “Your Highness,” as in the “King of Straw Men.” “Your Kingdom for an Edit button…”

    43. Evan3457
      September 3rd, 2013 | 10:37 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      the vast majority of the talent he inherited from Michael/Watson has been gone for over a decade now.
      Another straw man: the vast majority of that talent was not gone from 1998-2001. Have any of: Jeter, Pettitte, Posada, Rivera, Williams, etc. been gone for over a decade now?

      Yeah, this reply is 100% wrong.

      In 2001, the key players on the Yankees, aside from Jeter, Pettitte, Posada, Rivera and Williams were, Martinez, Knoblauch, O’Neill, Brosius, Clemens, Mussina, El Duque Hernandez, Stanton, and Mendoza.

      By 2004, all but Mussina and El Duque were gone, and Pettitte had left as well, not to return for 5 years. By 2004, Bernie was already in deep decline. By any objective measure, the large majority of the key players of the 1996-2001 teams had left or declined. Jeter, Posada, and Mariano were still there and going strong, and that’s three great players, but not nearly the majority of the value of the team that won 4 titles and 5 pennants in 6 years.

      Cashman is a failure given the team’s .500 postseason winning pct. since 2005 and the resources spent in that time

      Opinion. Unprovable assertion.

      and the current state of the team in 2013.
      If the team’s winning pct. was greater and more postseason series were won, and the current state of the team was better, he wouldn’t be considered the failure he is by most.

      If this team fails to make the post-season, as appears likely at the moment, it will for the same reasons they didn’t make it in 2008. Massive frequency and duration of injuries through the lineup.

      I meant, “Your Highness,” as in the “King of Straw Men.” “Your Kingdom for an Edit button…”

      Childish trolling, again. Attacking my typos, I’m cut to the quick.
      Not.

    44. rankdog
      September 4th, 2013 | 3:57 am

      I think a lot of this is kick a dog when he is down type of stuff. While I have been in pro Cashman camp for years, I am leaving the camp. Not because of any fundamental change in Cashman, but there has been a clear change in management and way Yankees do business.

      The club is now being run like a middle tier market club. The Yankees no longer take risks on acquiring potential top tier talent (Solar, Puig, Darvish, ect) instead we take risks on guys pegged by the pro scouting department (Billy Eppler) such as Colon, Youk, Soriano, Wells ect. Every move is made with eye toward a spreadsheet and a balance.

      Cashman, by extension the people underneath him, are who are they are. The club hasn’t been able to develop low round draft picks into Major league starters. They are good at delivering a cheap bullpen and a few average to above average starters (Gardner, Yang, IPK, AJackson). Under the new management, the Yankees are to fill holes through the minor league system which has drafted in the lower half of the draft for a decade and half. This is not Cashman and crew’s strength.

      Nor was there a long term plan in place for this transition. Why sign ARod, CC ect to longer term contracts or pursue Cliff Lee if they were going to get under the cap with young cheap talent? Surely you can’t pin this BS change of direction on Cashman? (Of course you can because your blindly bias to all things Cashman)

      Here you go GM, stay competitive but only sign one year contracts so we can cut salary next year. I expect you fill in the holes with minor league talent.

      If this is the future of this club they will need to find a GM/staff with a different skill set. The current GM/staff do not fit the new ownership’s mandate.

      Blaming Cashman for the clubs determination to meet a balance sheet ahead of putting the best talent on the field is folly. The club is ignoring its biggest advantage in leveraging its financial might to acquire talent. This is the after effect of the death of King George. We no longer have an owner with balls or a commitment to winning. We have owners hanging on to the club to make as much money as possible before selling off for insane amounts of money. But hey go ahead and lay the blame on the GM. A new GM will magically fix everything right? (last comment was sarcasm)

    45. Raf
      September 4th, 2013 | 7:06 am

      rankdog wrote:

      The Yankees no longer take risks on acquiring potential top tier talent (Solar, Puig, Darvish, ect) instead we take risks on guys pegged by the pro scouting department (Billy Eppler) such as Colon, Youk, Soriano, Wells ect.

      The Yanks can do both. FWIW, the Yanks did make an offer on Jorge Soler, and it looks like they’ll be in on Rakuten’s Masahiro Tanaka, so I wouldn’t say they’re not willing to take risks.

    46. MJ Recanati
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:20 am

      Raf wrote:

      I wouldn’t say they’re not willing to take risks.

      I actually don’t agree. They’re far more risk-averse in all facets of their player development than they should be, and the high-profile misses with Igawa, Cole, and Brackman haven’t helped that trend towards conservative management.

    47. Mr. October
      September 4th, 2013 | 3:06 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Yeah, this reply is 100% wrong.
      In 2001, the key players on the Yankees, aside from Jeter, Pettitte, Posada, Rivera and Williams were, Martinez, Knoblauch, O’Neill, Brosius, Clemens, Mussina, El Duque Hernandez, Stanton, and Mendoza.

      No, your’s is, as is usually the case.

      The entire starting lineup in 2001 preceded Cashman, as did the entire bullpen for the most part. Cashman’s most significant contribution to the rotation was getting approval for $88.5 mil. to sign Mussina.

      And you arbitrarily chose the year 2001, when I referred to 1998-2001 as a whole. In 2000 for example, the last year for which Michael should be credited with a world championship, players not acquired by Cashman included:

      Posada
      Martinez
      Knowblauch
      Jeter
      Brosius
      Ledee
      Williams
      O’Neill
      Spencer
      Sojo
      Soriano
      Pettitte
      Cone
      Hernandez
      Mendoza
      Nelson
      Rivera
      Stanton

      Cashman’s “contributions” to the 2000 roster included:

      Canseco
      Clemens (acquired for David Wells in 1999)
      Hill
      Leyritz
      Lilly (traded for Jeff Weaver in 2002)
      Neagle
      Polonia
      Thompson
      Yarnell (acquired for Mike Lowell in 1999)

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Opinion. Unprovable assertion.

      It’s not opinion, or an unprovable assertion, that the team is 25-26 (.490) in the postseason since 2005 (http://www.baseball-reference.com/). And it’s not opinion, or an unprovable assertion, the team has outspent most franchises by almost $1 billion in that time.
      St. Louis somehow found a way to play .561 postseason baseball and win three times as many pennants and two times as many world championships spending less than half the money in that time – postseason play: any comparison of the AL East to the NL Central is irrelevant.

    48. Evan3457
      September 4th, 2013 | 4:38 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      Yeah, this reply is 100% wrong.
      In 2001, the key players on the Yankees, aside from Jeter, Pettitte, Posada, Rivera and Williams were, Martinez, Knoblauch, O’Neill, Brosius, Clemens, Mussina, El Duque Hernandez, Stanton, and Mendoza.
      No, your’s is, as is usually the case.
      The entire starting lineup in 2001 preceded Cashman, as did the entire bullpen for the most part. Cashman’s most significant contribution to the rotation was getting approval for $88.5 mil. to sign Mussina.
      And you arbitrarily chose the year 2001, when I referred to 1998-2001 as a whole. In 2000 for example, the last year for which Michael should be credited with a world championship, players not acquired by Cashman included:
      Posada
      Martinez
      Knowblauch
      Jeter
      Brosius
      Ledee
      Williams
      O’Neill
      Spencer
      Sojo
      Soriano
      Pettitte
      Cone
      Hernandez
      Mendoza
      Nelson
      Rivera
      Stanton
      Cashman’s “contributions” to the 2000 roster included:
      Canseco
      Clemens (acquired for David Wells in 1999)
      Hill
      Leyritz
      Lilly (traded for Jeff Weaver in 2002)
      Neagle
      Polonia
      Thompson
      Yarnell (acquired for Mike Lowell in 1999)

      Amazing that you both proved my point and missed it at the same time.

      I said the vast majority of the talent Cashman inherited has been gone for over a decade now. Most of the players on this list were gone by 2003. Even more by 2004. Same for most of the Bwar.

      Thanks for proving me right. How stupid can YOU get?

      It’s not opinion, or an unprovable assertion, that the team is 25-26 (.490) in the postseason since 2005 (http://www.baseball-reference.com/). And it’s not opinion, or an unprovable assertion, the team has outspent most franchises by almost $1 billion in that time.
      St. Louis somehow found a way to play .561 postseason baseball and win three times as many pennants and two times as many world championships spending less than half the money in that time – postseason play:

      Your statement starts “Cashman is a failure…”
      That’s the assertion you can’t prove. All you’ve is that the people running the St Louis franchise (and Boston and San Francisco franchises) have done better at winning World Series titles.

      any comparison of the AL East to the NL Central is irrelevant.

      Of course, the first step in winning a title is to make the playoffs, and your opinion that the relative strengths of the divisional opponents don’t matter when it comes to making the playoffs in the first place is pure clown shoes.

    49. Sweet Lou
      September 4th, 2013 | 5:02 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      By 2004, all but Mussina and El Duque were gone, and Pettitte had left as well, not to return for 5 years. By 2004, Bernie was already in deep decline. By any objective measure, the large majority of the key players of the 1996-2001 teams had left or declined. Jeter, Posada, and Mariano were still there and going strong, and that’s three great players, but not nearly the majority of the value of the team that won 4 titles and 5 pennants in 6 years.

      The number of pennants won since 2004? 1.

      Starting with a team that came within innings of a pennant in 2004, Cashman’s won only 1 pennant since everyone in the baseball operations department began reporting to him sometime in 2005 – 1 pennant in 9 years with what was essentially a pennant winner to begin with! And how many billions spent?

      Impressive job…

      You can’t say the team played well in the post-season and things just didn’t go their way – they have a .490 post-season W-L record in over 50 games played in that time.

      Evan3457 wrote:

      If this team fails to make the post-season, as appears likely at the moment, it will for the same reasons they didn’t make it in 2008. Massive frequency and duration of injuries through the lineup.

      The biggest injury to this team in 2013 has been Cashman’s health.

    50. Mr. October
      September 4th, 2013 | 6:02 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      I said the vast majority of the talent Cashman inherited has been gone for over a decade now.

      And the team’s won only 1 pennant in that decade – what a coincidence! How many pennants did it win from 1996-2001, while winning 75.4% of its postseason games?

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Your statement starts “Cashman is a failure…” That’s the assertion you can’t prove.

      I just did: a .490 postseason winning percentage over 8 years with all of the billions spent proves just that.

      Evan3457 wrote:

      All you’ve [proven] is that the people running the St Louis franchise (and Boston and San Francisco franchises) have done better at winning World Series titles.

      What was proven was that St. Louis is just one example of a franchise that has done much better since 2005, and has done so with less than half the money Cashman spent – I wrote nothing about any other franchise.

      Anyone who wants to say Cashman has to spend more in the AL East can, but that doesn’t change the fact that he’s spent it on teams that have not been able to win more than 49% of their games AFTER the AL East was decided and against postseason competition over an EIGHT YEAR period – he’s had a lot of time AND a lot of money to spend to get that WPCT over .500 and has FAILED.

    51. Kamieniecki
      September 4th, 2013 | 7:31 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Of course, the first step in winning a title is to make the playoffs

      Exactly – it’s only a step; nothing more. the ALDS is also only a step; nothing more. It’s like getting Louise Meanwell’s phone number: it’s a step; nothing more.

      The next step is play better than .500 baseball, because the postseason is a tournament of “best of” series – that’s the problem Cashman has: building teams that can play .500 baseball against teams that win the AL Central or AL West. You can’t win a ring playing .500 baseball in the postseason, as you can’t give Louise Meanwell a ring without her phone number.

      Either that, or some of us are supposed to believe that the AL Central or AL West winning teams just happen to “get hot” against Cashman’s teams 6 out of every 7 years.

      We’re supposed to believe that the same guy who was one day putting on a UPS uniform, and the next day earning a $3 million/yr. salary working for his father’s friend, is the same guy who is so unlucky that in 6 out of every 7 years, the his postseason competition “gets hot” just before playing his team.

    52. Mr. October
      September 4th, 2013 | 8:42 pm

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      We’re supposed to believe that the same guy who was one day putting on a UPS uniform, and the next day earning a $3 million/yr. salary working for his father’s friend, is the same guy who is so unlucky that in 6 out of every 7 years, the his postseason competition “gets hot” just before playing his team.

      @ Kamieniecki:
      LOL…

      To me, it seems the entire reasoning behind the position that Cashman’s teams lose in the post-season because other teams get hot boils down to this: the teams that win in the post-season are the teams that get hot in the post-season.

      This is a classic example of post hoc ergo propter hoc.
      @ Evan3457:

    53. Evan3457
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:05 pm

      Sweet Lou wrote:

      The number of pennants won since 2004? 1.
      Starting with a team that came within innings of a pennant in 2004, Cashman’s won only 1 pennant since everyone in the baseball operations department began reporting to him sometime in 2005 – 1 pennant in 9 years with what was essentially a pennant winner to begin with! And how many billions spent?

      Right; exactly, the team that did won all the titles was mostly gone. Congratulations to you; you figured it out.

      You can’t say the team played well in the post-season and things just didn’t go their way – they have a .490 post-season W-L record in over 50 games played in that time.

      Not saying that, either.

      The biggest injury to this team in 2013 has been Cashman’s health.

      Silly, juvenile remark.

    54. Evan3457
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:09 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      And the team’s won only 1 pennant in that decade – what a coincidence! How many pennants did it win from 1996-2001, while winning 75.4% of its postseason games?

      As if such a team can be re-assembled and re-re-assembled at will.

      I just did: a .490 postseason winning percentage over 8 years with all of the billions spent proves just that.

      No, it doesn’t. But we’ve been through all this before.

      What was proven was that St. Louis is just one example of a franchise that has done much better since 2005, and has done so with less than half the money Cashman spent – I wrote nothing about any other franchise.

      Which is why I referred to the other two teams parenthetically. and proving one team has done better doesn’t prove Cashman is “a failure”.

      Anyone who wants to say Cashman has to spend more in the AL East can, but that doesn’t change the fact that he’s spent it on teams that have not been able to win more than 49% of their games AFTER the AL East was decided and against postseason competition over an EIGHT YEAR period – he’s had a lot of time AND a lot of money to spend to get that WPCT over .500 and has FAILED.

      Arbitrary criterion selected by you which proves…not much.

    55. Mr. October
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:09 pm

      rankdog wrote:

      A new GM will magically fix everything right? (last comment was sarcasm)

      Wrong. A new GM will fix everything not with magic, but a modicum of intelligence.

    56. Evan3457
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:23 pm

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      Of course, the first step in winning a title is to make the playoffs
      Exactly – it’s only a step; nothing more. the ALDS is also only a step; nothing more. It’s like getting Louise Meanwell’s phone number: it’s a step; nothing more.

      Meaningless response.

      The next step is play better than .500 baseball, because the postseason is a tournament of “best of” series –

      Thank you, Captain Obvious.

      that’s the problem Cashman has: building teams that can play .500 baseball against teams that win the AL Central or AL West.

      Or, they beat one such team, then lose to another, which has happened in 2 of the 7 years. Or they beat two such teams, on their way to winning against an NL team, which happened once.

      You can’t win a ring playing .500 baseball in the postseason, as you can’t give Louise Meanwell a ring without her phone number.

      Thanks again, Cap’n.

      Either that, or some of us are supposed to believe that the AL Central or AL West winning teams just happen to “get hot” against Cashman’s teams 6 out of every 7 years.

      Or we’re supposed to believe that most years, the post-season isn’t a crapshoot among teams that are close in ability.

      We’re supposed to believe that the same guy who was one day putting on a UPS uniform, and the next day earning a $3 million/yr.

      The next day, or 20 years later with nothing happening in between, same thing.

      salary working for his father’s friend,

      The guy who hired him is the same guy who promoted him several times. Either George was an idiot, too, or George saw something worth promoting and rewarding. Your choice.

      is the same guy who is so unlucky that in 6 out of every 7 years, the his postseason competition “gets hot” just before playing his team.

      …is one way to put it. The other way is that the teams have won 5 of 11 series against teams about as good, most of those years. I mean, it’s not like this every happens to other very good teams over a long stretch of time, like say, the Braves losing 10 of 18 series and winning no titles from 1996 through 2005. No sirree, the Yanks are unique.

    57. Evan3457
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:24 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      Kamieniecki wrote:
      We’re supposed to believe that the same guy who was one day putting on a UPS uniform, and the next day earning a $3 million/yr. salary working for his father’s friend, is the same guy who is so unlucky that in 6 out of every 7 years, the his postseason competition “gets hot” just before playing his team.
      @ Kamieniecki:
      LOL…
      To me, it seems the entire reasoning behind the position that Cashman’s teams lose in the post-season because other teams get hot boils down to this: the teams that win in the post-season are the teams that get hot in the post-season.
      This is a classic example of post hoc ergo propter hoc.
      @ Evan3457:

      Not my argument. It is, however, another straw man.

    58. Evan3457
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:26 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      rankdog wrote:
      A new GM will magically fix everything right? (last comment was sarcasm)
      Wrong. A new GM will fix everything not with magic, but a modicum of intelligence.

      Maybe. Maybe not.

    59. Mr. October
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:36 pm

      @ Evan3457:
      Evan3457 wrote:

      As if such a team can be re-assembled and re-re-assembled at will.

      I’ll settle for re-assembled. How many more years and billions of dollars do you think Cashman might need?

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Arbitrary criterion selected by you which proves…not much.

      @ Evan3457:
      “Arbitrary?” I “selected” that criterion on the basis of Cashman’s own words from an Oct., 2005 press conference…

      8 years proves “not much?” How many more years do we need? The average human life expectancy is only 78.7 years…

    60. Mr. October
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:46 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      [A new GM will fix everything not with magic, but a modicum of intelligence] Maybe. Maybe not.

      @ Evan3457:
      You’re right: it will take more than a modicum of intelligence to clean up the mess Cashman will leave behind…

    61. Kamieniecki
      September 4th, 2013 | 9:59 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      I mean, it’s not like this every happens to other very good teams over a long stretch of time, like say, the Braves losing 10 of 18 series and winning no titles from 1996 through 2005. No sirree, the Yanks are unique.

      @ Evan3457:
      The Braves won 1 world championship and 2 pennants from 1995-2004, losing both Series to Michael’s Yankees. Is there some reason you picked 1996-2005? Did Schuerholz announce in Oct., 1996, “I’m the general manager, and everybody within the baseball operations department reports to me… That’s not how it has operated recently.”

    62. Evan3457
      September 5th, 2013 | 5:06 am

      Mr. October wrote:

      @ Evan3457:
      Evan3457 wrote:
      As if such a team can be re-assembled and re-re-assembled at will.
      I’ll settle for re-assembled. How many more years and billions of dollars do you think Cashman might need?

      Well, considering that such a team might never be assembled again, by anyone, the question’s pretty much moot. Until somebody does it again.
      The competitive conditions of the game have changed dramatically in last 15 years, by design of MLB.

      “Arbitrary?” I “selected” that criterion on the basis of Cashman’s own words from an Oct., 2005 press conference…

      Source, please. I’ll want to take a look at the exact quote.

      8 years proves “not much?” How many more years do we need? The average human life expectancy is only 78.7 years…

      Not really. Most teams go decades without winning it all, during good management and bad. Even the Orioles and Mets have gone without winning it all, despite having had high payrolls for multiple years in a row.

    63. Evan3457
      September 5th, 2013 | 5:11 am

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      The Braves won 1 world championship and 2 pennants from 1995-2004, losing both Series to Michael’s Yankees. Is there some reason you picked 1996-2005? Did Schuerholz announce in Oct., 1996, “I’m the general manager, and everybody within the baseball operations department reports to me… That’s not how it has operated recently.”

      And, as you well know, that autonomy no longer exists, and really, it lasted all of 2 seasons, when Hank apparently overruled Cashman to re-sign Rodriguez. So if you can pick the seasons you want, I’ll pick the seasons I want. Fair’s fair.

      After all, in the two years preceding Cashman’s “autonomy”, teams that were at least half his design won 3 post-season series, and lost 2, won 15 post-season games and lost 13, and won one pennant.

    64. Evan3457
      September 5th, 2013 | 5:12 am

      Mr. October wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      [A new GM will fix everything not with magic, but a modicum of intelligence] Maybe. Maybe not.
      @ Evan3457:
      You’re right: it will take more than a modicum of intelligence to clean up the mess Cashman will leave behind…

      More than likely, it will take a return of the free spending after the 2014 season in the short run, after the luxury tax reset, to return to contention, and in the mid-term run, a little better luck in developing the prospects they do have for contention in the long run.

      Regardless of who winds up being the GM, if not Cashman.

    65. Mr. October
      September 5th, 2013 | 9:37 am

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Well, considering that such a team might never be assembled again, by anyone, the question’s pretty much moot. Until somebody does it again.
      The competitive conditions of the game have changed dramatically in last 15 years, by design of MLB.

      This team is 25-26 in the postseason since 2005 spending $200-30 mil. each year not because of so-called dramatic changes to the competitive environment, or bad luck – it has a .490 postseason winning pct. in 51 postseason games because of bad general management. Period.

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Source, please. I’ll want to take a look at the exact quote.

      Look it up yourself.

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Not really. Most teams go decades without winning it all, during good management and bad. Even the Orioles and Mets have gone without winning it all, despite having had high payrolls for multiple years in a row.

      Cashman can’t be one of the worst GMs in baseball because the Mets have gone without winning it all with high payrolls for multiple years – Excellent point.

      Evan3457 wrote:

      After all, in the two years preceding Cashman’s “autonomy”, teams that were at least half his design won 3 post-season series, and lost 2, won 15 post-season games and lost 13, and won one pennant.

      LOL. That’s 100% correct: since 1998 the team has been in steady decline. From three World Series titles, to two pennants, to nothing from 2004-09 until $423 million was spent on free agents. Four years and zero pennants later, the team is right back where it was in 2008, only now it has a 290 lb. albatross earning $24 mil. per year until 2017 at the front of its rotation, and nothing after him.

      The Sabathia contract is one of the worst in baseball at this point – $96 million committed to a pitcher 33-year old pitcher currently 13-11 with a 4.86 ERA and more innings in his arm than any other pitcher over the last six seasons. Whom are we blaming for the Sabathia contract? Steinbrenner? Trost? Levine?

      “‘CC is the ace of our pitching staff…’ Yankees general manager Brian Cashman said in a statement… ‘We are excited that he will be wearing the pinstripes for many years to come.’”

      Less than two years later:

      “‘That contract might not be a disaster of A-Rod-ian proportions, but unless Sabathia finds a way to turn it all round, it might turn out to be the next-worst thing,…. Sabathia has three years left on his contract, plus a vesting option for 2017 that the Yankees can avoid only if Sabathia has a left shoulder injury. All told, the Yankees are likely to be on the hook for $96MM after this season.”

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