• Yanks Have Even Less To Spend Next Year?

    Posted by on September 25th, 2013 · Comments (52)

    Via Joel Sherman -

    Understand something about the $189 million luxury-tax threshold for next season. It isn’t really $189 million.

    Each team is charged roughly $11 million for items such as insurance and pension. Thus, if the Yankees are going to get under — and I believe they are determined to do so — then they can pay their players about $178 million.

    But wait. It isn’t like they could just get to $177.9 million in the offseason. They need to create spare money for promotions, potential bonuses reached and obtaining players via trade. Let’s make that a conservative $8 million.

    OK, now we are talking about the Yanks having approximately $170 million for players next season. Assuming Derek Jeter picks up his option and Alex Rodriguez’s suspension is upheld, the Yanks would have six players signed for next season — Jeter, CC Sabathia, Mark Teixeira, Alfonso Soriano, Ichiro Suzuki and Vernon Wells. For luxury-tax purposes, that crew costs roughly $68.5 million.

    That would leave a little more than $100 million to spend, and you can subtract about another $14million-$16 million to reach agreement with the arbitration-eligible Brett Gardner, David Robertson, Ivan Nova, Shawn Kelley and Francisco Cervelli. We can assume another $3-$4 million for five or six non-arbitration players such as David Phelps and Adam Warren.

    That will leave around $80 million, and a good deal of that will be earmarked for Robinson Cano, Curtis Granderson, Hiroki Kuroda — or their replacements.

    You can see how quickly the money goes and why the Yanks are pretty much desperate for A-Rod’s suspension to be upheld and his $27.5 million to go away from their ledger.

    It means the Yanks are going to have to count pennies elsewhere in trying to still have a deep/contending roster with the $189 million constraints.

    I really hope the Yankees do find a way to get Brendan Ryan to return in 2014. They’re going to need a shortstop. I have no faith in Jeter’s ability to man that position – either well or for a prolonged period. And, I can live with no stick when it’s a glove like Ryan.

    Rk Player dWAR From To Age G
    1 Brendan Ryan 13.7 2009 2013 27-31 631
    2 Clint Barmes 9.9 2009 2013 30-34 659
    3 Alexei Ramirez 8.8 2009 2013 27-31 774
    4 Yunel Escobar 8.2 2009 2013 26-30 703
    5 Andrelton Simmons 7.8 2012 2013 22-23 201
    6 Troy Tulowitzki 7.6 2009 2013 24-28 585
    7 Elvis Andrus 7.5 2009 2013 20-24 751
    8 J.J. Hardy 7.0 2009 2013 26-30 657
    9 Jack Wilson 5.5 2009 2012 31-34 286
    10 Alcides Escobar 5.4 2009 2013 22-26 651
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 9/25/2013.

    .

    Comments on Yanks Have Even Less To Spend Next Year?

    1. #15
      September 25th, 2013 | 4:58 pm

      I agree on Ryan. He’s the defensive savant I always want to have on the roster.

      A-Rod to the gallows, Jeter to 3rd, Ryan to short?

      Or…. Reynolds to 3rd (I hate the strikeouts and streaky hitting), Jeter to short, Ryan to super ute?

    2. MJ Recanati
      September 25th, 2013 | 5:08 pm

      @ #15:
      I agree with Steve. Jeter can’t be counted on a regular player next year, not at 3B and not at SS (and I highly doubt Jeter would agree to playing 3B anyway).

    3. Raf
      September 25th, 2013 | 7:55 pm

      I thought Ryan was a FA after next season?

      I am surprised that a player like Ryan doesn’t choke up and try to spray the ball all over the field. I mean it’s not like what he has been doing has been working for him offensively.

    4. Garcia
      September 25th, 2013 | 10:13 pm

      Yeah, agreed Steve.

    5. Evan3457
      September 26th, 2013 | 12:02 am

      Ryan is a free agent when the season ends. You can carry his glove if you can get good offense from the other 8 slots in the lineup. You can’t really carry a .198 BAVG .545 OPS guy otherwise.

      One thing is interesting about Ryan: watching him informs every fan with eyes why the defensive metrics show Jeter as -200 defensive runs for his career. The difference in range, even over Dynasty Jeter is huge and easy to see. In his 3 weeks with the Yankees, Ryan’s made more plays on the left side of 2nd base than Jeter has in the last decade.

      Is that a knock on Jeter? Yes, it is. Would I have rather had Ryan, or someone like him, at shortstop, rather than Jeter? Absolutely not. Is Jeter still a no-doubt 1st ballot Hall of Famer? Yes, he is.

      Lots of players had one serious weakness. A player can still be great, even with a serious weakness. Mantle had K’s and durability. Rizzuto had no power. Reggie Jackson K’d even more than Mickey. Rickey Henderson had a weak arm, and a wandering attention span over the course of some seasons. Don Mattingly didn’t draw enough non-intentional walks for a hitter of his caliber. Heck, even Babe Ruth was a bad basestealer; even made the last out of a World Series one-run Game 7 that way, but he kept on trying for a long time in his career.

      Jeter did everything very well, on and off the field, except range far from his original position to get grounders.

    6. ctkaiser
      September 26th, 2013 | 12:06 am

      Ryan is very good defensively and just a few years ago hit around .270. Can he get any better? It would kill me to go another season with guys hitting .200. As it is we may see Wells at .240 and Ichiro hovering around .260 again. I would like to see a couple of guys in the lineup with higher BA and OBP. I think resigning Cano and haveing Tex back along with Soriano the HR power is there.

    7. KPOcala
      September 26th, 2013 | 1:16 am

      The Yankees need to hold on to the best that they have (personally, I still think that Hughes and Chamberlain have potential, albeit at the “right price”), and add three top-tiered starters, along with 4-5 “very good” position players. Can they do it within budget? IF A-Rod misses the year, hell the Red Sox proved it can be done. But man, the parts in the machine can’t get chipped, or otherwise “loose”, i.e., everything has to go “right” for the Yankees to contend next year, or the year after. After that, who can tell……….. Finding the starters, good gaaaaaaaaaawd……….

    8. Mr. October
      September 26th, 2013 | 12:33 pm

      The Real Cashman Autonomy Era begins…

      Freedom from George Steinbrenner’s interference with an additional $30-40 million in payroll/year; freedom from the interference of Bernie Williams, Jorge Posada, Mariano Rivera, Andy Pettitte, etc., and soon Derek Jeter, on the field of play.

      Say Hello to The Real Cashman Autonomy Era.

      Say Goodbye to “… but the team makes it to the playoffs almost every year…”

      The St. Louis Cardinals get World Series win no. 28 before The New York Yankees get American League pennant win no. 41 with Cashman. Book it.

    9. Mr. October
      September 26th, 2013 | 12:47 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Reggie Jackson K’d even more than Mickey.

      Not more than Kurtis.

    10. MJ Recanati
      September 26th, 2013 | 1:38 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      Not more than Kurtis.

      Reggie Jackson career AB/SO (league average): 3.8 (6.4)
      Reggie Jackson career SO% (league average): 22.7% (13.9%)

      Curtis Granderson career AB/SO (league average): 3.8 (5.0)
      Curtis Granderson career SO% (league average): 23.1% (17.9%)

      Seems like Curtis and Reggie struck out at very similar rates, where Reggie’s K’s far outpaced league average.

    11. MJ Recanati
      September 26th, 2013 | 1:40 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      The St. Louis Cardinals get World Series win no. 28 before The New York Yankees get American League pennant win no. 41 with Cashman. Book it.

      You think the Cardinals will win 17 more championships before the Yankees make it back to a World Series?

      That’s odds I’ll gladly take.

    12. Garcia
      September 26th, 2013 | 3:59 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      That’s odds I’ll gladly take.

      Yeah, some people love to speak using hyperbole as their standard speak — i guess it validates their existence, makes’em feel really bright. Similar tactics are often used by religion to control the masses. Fire and brimstone is not just a metaphor, it’s an absolute eff’ing fact for some.

    13. Mr. October
      September 26th, 2013 | 4:26 pm

      @ MJ Recanati:
      Come up with a bet in which one of the terms is the Yankees not accomplishing something with Cashman as GM, and we’ll each send a check to Steve. Your money and mine will be donated to the HSUS once you lose…

    14. MJ Recanati
      September 26th, 2013 | 4:55 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      Come up with a bet in which one of the terms is the Yankees not accomplishing something with Cashman as GM, and we’ll each send a check to Steve. Your money and mine will be donated to the HSUS once you lose…

      You already came up with the bet. You’re betting that the Cardinals win 17 more championships before the Yankees make it back to a World Series.

      I’ve accepted that bet and I’m happy to send a check to Steve to hold in escrow while we wait for the Cardinals to win those 17 titles. Given the absurdly long time-frame you’ll need in order to win your side of the bet, I only ask that Steve invests the money so that my winnings are bearing interest.

    15. redbug
      September 26th, 2013 | 5:52 pm

      Steve,

      What’s this “analytics.js” that keeps popping up and wants to install?

    16. Sweet Lou
      September 26th, 2013 | 8:02 pm

      How ridiculous will Girardi look walking around with the number 28 on his back for another year if he decides to return? He might consider the number of third place finishes in franchise history, plus one…

    17. MJ Recanati
      September 27th, 2013 | 8:52 am

      Sweet Lou wrote:

      How ridiculous will Girardi look walking around with the number 28 on his back for another year if he decides to return? He might consider the number of third place finishes in franchise history, plus one…

      They’re at 12, not including this year.

    18. Sweet Lou
      September 27th, 2013 | 12:58 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      They’re at 12, not including this year.

      @ MJ Recanati:
      If Cashman is to be given a new contract, then 13 is PERFECT: it will be highly improbable the team finishes above fourth place twice (Munson’s 15 is retired) for the duration of Girardi’s new contract, and Rodriguez won’t need the number next year.

    19. Mr. October
      September 27th, 2013 | 2:32 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Seems like Curtis and Reggie struck out at very similar rates…

      Not more than Kurtis.

    20. Mr. October
      September 27th, 2013 | 3:02 pm

      Garcia wrote:

      Yeah, some people love to speak using hyperbole as their standard speak — i guess it validates their existence, makes’em feel really bright. Similar tactics are often used by religion to control the masses. Fire and brimstone is not just a metaphor, it’s an absolute eff’ing fact for some.

      This team does not get to the World Series with Cashman – not without the payroll advantage the team had in recent years and with Sabathia, Teixeira, and Rodriguez on the books through 2016.

      Cashman will have retired comfortably from his careers with UPS and the New York Yankees before St. Louis has a chance to play in 17 postseasons, much less win 17 World Series – but the franchise doesn’t win an LCS with Cashman and Hal Steinbrenner’s insistence on more reasonable payroll numbers. Book it.

    21. McMillan
      September 27th, 2013 | 3:15 pm

      @ Raf:
      Without money to spend in the 2012-13 offseason, Cashman went down faster than a Thai hooker.

    22. Garcia
      September 27th, 2013 | 4:06 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      This team does not get to the World Series with Cashman – not without the payroll advantage the team had in recent years and with Sabathia, Teixeira, and Rodriguez on the books through 2016.
      Cashman will have retired comfortably from his careers with UPS and the New York Yankees before St. Louis has a chance to play in 17 postseasons, much less win 17 World Series – but the franchise doesn’t win an LCS with Cashman and Hal Steinbrenner’s insistence on more reasonable payroll numbers. Book it.

      Why do you sound like a broken record? Nobody here is advocating Cashman keep his job or that he’s doing a great job. Cashman is on a pretty horrible run as a GM. Can we at least say we agree there? It is definitely time for him to go, but what I don’t get (as well as others around these parts), is your refusal to understand context with some moves.

      You look at these moves as a binary thing; they didn’t work so therefore he’s awful. I don’t think it is so beyond the absurd to understand why a certain move was made.

      For example, I think it’s pretty apparent that Cash sucks at the draft. The team continues to make some pretty horrible choices in the amateur draft. Agree, right? However, when it comes to the free agent market, it’s a bit more complex and Cash signing Pavano, trading for Weaver, trading for Vazquez with the major focus being to get younger, made a lot of sense at the time (2004). These were major league players, who, at the time, had a body of work that put them on a trajectory to be potential stars — or at the very least above average.

      To critique these moves seems silly to me. To critique the acquisition of Vazquez (2nd time around) is perfectly legit. Or critiquing the signing of Nick Johnson (2010). Or critiquing the signing of Youkilis this year. Notice the distinction? Maybe you don’t, but let me keep going anyway. These were horrible moves and he deserves to be held accountable, I don’t think there were many people who were supportive of these moves and did not see the impending disaster. I know Steve was critical of the moves, and he was spot-on.

      What annoys me is that you even want to discredit him even when the team is doing well. When he does well its dumb luck, when he falters then that was his destiny from the onset because .

      I love dumb shit like just the next guy, but a bunch of you have gone way beyond being silly…you’re just plain eff’ing annoying already. But if it makes your dick look bigger when you look in the mirror, then maybe you should hang out at blogs about social workers or something. If it’s truly about making up for other shortcomings (non-Cashman related) in your life and you need to feel better about yourself. Your inner-child needs a big hug!

    23. Raf
      September 27th, 2013 | 4:41 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      @ Raf:
      Without money to spend in the 2012-13 offseason, Cashman went down faster than a Thai hooker.

      Injuries played a larger role, than the lack of money spent.

    24. Corey
      September 27th, 2013 | 5:28 pm

      @ Garcia:
      Totally agree

    25. Greg H.
      September 28th, 2013 | 6:54 am

      @ Corey:
      +1

    26. McMillan
      September 28th, 2013 | 12:13 pm

      Raf wrote:

      Injuries played a larger role, than the lack of money spent.

      LOL!!!!

      Which injury do you think played the largest role:

      Losing the .232-hitting (2012 AND 2013) centerfielder for 101 games?

      Losing the .244-hitting third baseman for 116 games?

      Losing the .205-hitting left-handed designated hitter for 81 games?

      Losing the .207-hitting catcher for 2 games in September?

      Losing the 39-year old shortstop for 145 games?

      Losing the 41-year old no. 3 starter for three starts starts in May?

      Losing the 4-14 no. 5 starter for three starts in March-April?

      Or:

      Losing the $24 million-per year no. 4 starter for one start in September after the team was eliminated from the postseason?

    27. Mr. October
      September 28th, 2013 | 1:09 pm

      Raf wrote:

      Injuries played a larger role, than the lack of money spent.

      Really?

      It would have been nice to have Hunter in right field from 2013-14, instead of Suzuki, but with all of the money spent from 2005-2012, that wasn’t possible – and that’s just looking at the 2012-13 offseason in isolation, and at only one player.

      Hunter will be playing rightfield in the 2013 postseason for Detroit.

      The team was restricted in the options it had to fill all of it’s holes because the payroll was so high. Although there was no reason Cashman could not have signed Pierzynski to a one-year contract to share catching responsibilities with Stewart and Cervell, while Cashman worked his way towards replacing Posada by the year 2019.

      Pierzynski might be playing in the 2013 postseason for Texas; there’s still two games to go. And Martin will be playing in the postseason, will he not? It seems the farther you get from Cashman, the closer you get to a ring.

      Garcia wrote:

      You look at [Cashman's] moves as a binary thing; they didn’t work so therefore he’s awful.

      Do you realize how stupid this statement is?

      Garcia wrote:

      What annoys me is that you even want to discredit him even when the team is doing well.

      @ Garcia:
      Cashman deserves credit for what, exactly? Spending $2.0-2.5 billion since 2005 to win 1 pennant?

      If you go back and read my comments, I have never considered this team to have been doing well because, with the exception of 2009, it has not been built to win in the postseason – and 2013 was no exception: this team was not going to win a postseason series behind Sabathia, Kuroda, Pettitte, and Hughes. The 38-year old Kuroda was out of gas by the end of August.

      I had written that in 2013, with the return of Teixeira, the team would have enough offense to get to the postseason, but it didn’t have the pitching to win – and it should have with over $2 billion spent since 2005.

      I have also written that Cashman is entrenched for years to come, but I no longer necessarily believe that is the case. He might very well be gone in the not-too-distant future; the situation is that bad.

      Garcia wrote:

      …you’re just plain eff’ing annoying already.

      Smoke another “doobie,” I’ll probably come across as less annoying.

      By the way, have you figured out the difference between deductive reasoning and inductive reasoning yet? The following might help (then again, it might not):

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deductive_reasoning

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inductive_reasoning

    28. Raf
      September 28th, 2013 | 1:39 pm

      @ Sybil:

      While I can appreciate your efforts, you really need to elevate your level of discourse. Your lack of knowledge on the subject of baseball, Yankees or otherwise has been, quite frankly, embarrassing.

      Here’s a start. “The following might help (then again, it might not)”
      http://baseballstats.tripod.com/batting.html
      http://www.ussmariner.com/2006/08/29/evaluating-pitcher-talent/

      Please read, review, then reformulate your question(s).

      Thanks in advance.

    29. McMillan
      September 28th, 2013 | 2:03 pm

      Raf wrote:

      … you really need to elevate your level of discourse.

      Raf wrote:

      Cute… I wouldn’t want to argue if I kept getting my ass handed to me either. If the above is the best you can do…

      @ Raf:
      I couldn’t have said it better myself…

    30. Raf
      September 28th, 2013 | 2:09 pm

      @ Garcia:
      I see what you mean.

    31. McMillan
      September 28th, 2013 | 2:16 pm

      @ Raf:
      Out of bullets? What a surprise…

    32. Raf
      September 28th, 2013 | 2:28 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      Out of bullets?

      Not going to waste them on the likes of you, I’m not Evan.

      You’ve been assigned your homework. Until you complete it, STFU Donnie.

    33. Garcia
      September 28th, 2013 | 7:25 pm

      @ Mr. October:
      Just like a gas takes up the area of its space, you have managed to expand like a smelly methane gas and fill this post with your blowhard ways. I don’t even get your point anymore, you’re arguing with yourself. And no amount of doobies, Heisenberg blue meth, or crack could ever make you and your friends any less repulsive.

    34. Garcia
      September 28th, 2013 | 7:29 pm

      Raf wrote:

      @ Garcia:
      I see what you mean.

      Yea, it’s way beyond absurd already.

    35. Mr. October
      September 28th, 2013 | 7:59 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      Losing the $24 million-per year no. 4 starter for one start in September after the team was eliminated from the postseason?

      The 250 lb. $24 million-per year no. 4 starter pitching 25 lbs. too light…

      Garcia wrote:

      I don’t even get your point anymore…

      It’s pretty simple:

      Mr. October wrote:

      … the franchise doesn’t win an LCS with Cashman and Hal Steinbrenner’s insistence on more reasonable payroll numbers. Book it.

      @ Garcia:
      That was my point; I can’t state it any more clearly than that. I correctly predicted how this season would play out six months ago. And I’m predicting the team wins nothing with Cashman as GM in the future with the current ownership. Or with any other team. “Book it” is an expression.

      Are you able to make any predictions?

    36. Mr. October
      September 28th, 2013 | 8:00 pm

      @ McMillan:
      Bullets? You mean blanks…

    37. McMillan
      September 28th, 2013 | 8:22 pm

      Garcia wrote:

      no amount of doobies, Heisenberg blue meth, or crack could ever make you and your friends any less repulsive.

      @ Garcia:
      Why don’t you give it a try? Try to set a new personal record…

      @ Raf:
      http://deadspin.com/5845140/the-photos-of-yankees-gm-brian-cashman-that-broke-up-a-marriage

    38. McMillan
      September 28th, 2013 | 8:27 pm

      @ Mr. October:
      “The Yankees plan to get under $189 million in payroll next season…

      The differentiation from other organizations will not be there. In fact, it is not hard to imagine more third- and fourth-place finishes in the next few years…”

      http://nypost.com/2013/09/27/like-rivera-cano-could-be-part-of-yankees-lore-if-he-re-signs/

    39. Mr. October
      September 28th, 2013 | 9:07 pm

      @ McMillan:
      Shocking – Paper Cup Cashman not being able to field third place teams with “only” $189-210 million – more than any franchise except the Dodgers.

    40. McMillan
      September 28th, 2013 | 10:01 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      Are you able to make any predictions?

      Garcia wrote:

      I would say the Yanks pitching is (at least) top 5 in the AL, and to me that would be the definition of strength.

      http://waswatching.com/2013/03/21/cashman-pitching-is-our-strength/

      Yankee pitching in 2013: 3.99 E.R.A.; good for 9th overall, or league-average.

      @ Raf:
      So much for that.

      Granderson certainly did his part tonight with all of the strike outs, making Pettitte work harder for a win to avoid the first losing season of Pettitte’s career. Congrats, Andy. You should have finished your career in the month of October.

    41. Evan3457
      September 28th, 2013 | 11:03 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      @ Mr. October:
      “The Yankees plan to get under $189 million in payroll next season…

      No they don’t.

      You told me so. And you’re always right.

    42. Raf
      September 29th, 2013 | 12:55 am

      Sybil wrote:

      http://deadspin.com/5845140/the-photos-of-yankees-gm-brian-cashman-that-broke-up-a-marriage

      “Brian Cashman has done a great job for us, and we want him to be with the Yankees for a long time.”

      That said, as a straight guy, I couldn’t care less about “Brian’s Dong (which you seemingly have bookmarked, as you’ve referenced it on several occasions). “Given that we live in enlightened times, I can understand if you do; to each their own. Enjoy it! :)

    43. McMillan
      September 29th, 2013 | 12:25 pm

      Raf wrote:

      “Brian Cashman has done a great job for us…”

      LOL – No one’s buying that as of Sep., 2013…

    44. Mr. October
      September 29th, 2013 | 1:40 pm

      “@ Mr. October:
      “The Yankees plan to get under $189 million in payroll next season…”

      Evan3457 wrote:

      No they don’t.

      You told me so. And you’re always right.

      @ Evan3457:

      The Yankees had reconsidered their plans to reduce the team’s payroll below the CBA luxury tax threshold for the 2014 season for several reasons (http://waswatching.com/2013/04/26/so-much-for-the-189m-payroll-plan/), however, Rodriguez’s suspension changes that:

      “You can see how quickly the money goes and why the Yanks are pretty much desperate for A-Rod’s suspension to be upheld and his $27.5 million to go away from their ledger.

      It means the Yanks are going to have to count pennies elsewhere in trying to still have a deep/contending roster with the $189 million constraints.”

      Raf wrote:

      …to each their own.

      @ Raf:
      It’s: “to each his own.”

    45. McMillan
      September 29th, 2013 | 1:57 pm

      Raf wrote:

      Injuries played a larger role, than the lack of money spent.

      @ Raf:
      Forgot to mention it: your use of the comma was incorrect.

    46. Evan3457
      September 29th, 2013 | 3:24 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      “@ Mr. October:
      “The Yankees plan to get under $189 million in payroll next season…”
      Evan3457 wrote:
      No they don’t.
      You told me so. And you’re always right.
      @ Evan3457:
      The Yankees had reconsidered their plans to reduce the team’s payroll below the CBA luxury tax threshold for the 2014 season for several reasons (http://waswatching.com/2013/04/26/so-much-for-the-189m-payroll-plan/), however, Rodriguez’s suspension changes that:
      “You can see how quickly the money goes and why the Yanks are pretty much desperate for A-Rod’s suspension to be upheld and his $27.5 million to go away from their ledger.
      It means the Yanks are going to have to count pennies elsewhere in trying to still have a deep/contending roster with the $189 million constraints.”

      They have still taken no action that will put them over $189 million. Citing more newspaper articles doesn’t cut it. As I told you before, actions speak louder than unnamed sources.
      As for A-Rod’s suspension, that isn’t settled yet.

    47. McMillan
      September 29th, 2013 | 8:47 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      As for A-Rod’s suspension, that isn’t settled yet.

      @ Evan3457:
      Does it really matter? They’re ‘f’-ed for years to come, whether the payroll’s $189 mil. or $220 mil., unless Hal Steinbrenner cleans house, starting with Brian “I control the Yankees and the Yankees control the universe” Cashman.

    48. Evan3457
      September 30th, 2013 | 1:33 am

      McMillan wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      As for A-Rod’s suspension, that isn’t settled yet.
      @ Evan3457:
      Does it really matter? They’re ‘f’-ed for years to come,

      Maybe. The other half of maybe is maybe not.

    49. Mr. October
      October 4th, 2013 | 2:24 pm

      Cashman: “I’m not afraid of reality… Don’t worry, it’s going to be fine.”

      “If Yankees keep payroll under $189 million, they’ll be sacrificing 2014 for future title runs

      … the Yankees are coming off their worst season in years.

      … with the idea of getting under the $189 million luxury-tax… the future of the Yankees is up in the air.

      ‘The only thing I can confidently tell you,’ Cashman said, ‘is when the last name is Steinbrenner, the effort is going to be there in terms of making a full push for having the best team on the field you can possibly have.’

      … With a trio of colossal contracts accounting for more than $70 million of next year’s payroll, there’s every reason to believe the Yankees (assuming they re-sign Cano) will have trouble assembling a championship-level roster while staying under the $189 million number.

      Does the almighty dollar outweigh the Yanks making a realistic run at a championship?

      … Baseball’s new rules have made it harder for [Cashman] to just buy [his] way out of trouble… major sources of revenue have… teams are locking up their young stars before they can get to the open market.

      This year’s free agent market aside from Cano: Ellsbury, Choo, and perhaps McCann; there aren’t many top players in their prime available this winter. If the Yankees decide to blow past the $189 million mark, exactly what will they be spending it on?

      So [on the one hand], getting under the threshold, and not making a serious run in 2014 may not only be the Yanks’ only choice, it could set them up for the long-term.

      Getting below the threshold would reset the luxury-tax rate… providing substantial savings… when young stars such as Trout and Harper… will be eligible to hit the free-agent market, assuming their current teams don’t lock them up first.

      If Trout received a 10-year, $300 million deal from the Yankees… under the current structure, the deal would actually cost the Yankees $450 million, but if the Bombers are under the tax threshold, the figure falls to $352.5 million…

      ‘There would be significant benefits,’ Cashman said… ‘Money that would be going out the door to MLB would be there for [me] to use [on siging starting pitching in Japan].’

      But [on the other hand] the question is, would another season of mediocrity – or a losing record – be worth it if it meant the ability to go back to their free-spending ways a year or two later [and did the Yankess fail in planning for the years 2012-2016 and beyond]?

      … Cashman said $189 million was ‘a goal, not a mandate,’ opening the door for spending if the Yankees find players they deem worthy.

      The Yankees are making plenty of money… the organization has dipped its toes in other areas… but the primary asset remains the [Yankees]. Keeping it relevant would seem to be in ownership’s best interests, especially after watching YES Network ratings and attendance numbers plummet during this 85-win campaign.

      Cashman [of course] is quick to point out that all he’s concerned about right now is putting together the best team he can for 2014… ‘That’s the nature of the Yankees,’ Cashman said… ‘We try to look at both the long-term and short-term, but the short-term is always the goal here…’

      … last winter, the Yankees opted not to keep Martin over what seemed like a pittance. They offered the catcher $14 million over two years, but wouldn’t match the Pirates’ offer of $17 million, letting Martin walk over $3 million spread out over two seasons.

      … some inside the industry believe the Yankees [were] taking a stance on overpaying players [which is not a good sign for Cashman]… Steinbrenner approved moves that added… financial commitments for both 2013 and ‘14.

      … There’s plenty of salary coming off the payroll, as Cano, Rivera, Pettitte, Granderson, Kuroda, Youkilis, Hughes, Hafner, Logan, Chamberlain and Overbay combined to make more than $94 million in 2013.

      … the Yankees have already committed roughly $86 million to Rodriguez, Teixeira, Sabathia, Soriano, Wells and Suzuki, while Jeter is expected to exercise his $9.5 million option to bring that number to more than $95 million.

      Add in substantial raises for third-year arbitration players Robertson and Gardner… and more modest raises for Nova, Kelley and a few other first- and second-time arbitration-eligible players, and the Yankees are approaching $110 million for 2014.

      And that’s without Cano, who figures to land a deal worth at least $25 million per season.

      That would leave about $40 million to sign the other 10 players for next year’s roster, as the $189 million figure includes all 40-man roster salaries, insurance costs, medical costs, pension benefits and other non-salary expenses.

      ‘I’m not afraid of the reality,’ Cashman said. ‘… We recognize there are some challenges that we have to deal with – and we’re up for that challenge. But I can’t tell you at the same time, “Don’t worry, it’s going to be fine.” It’s going to take some time.’

      Will it be enough to get the Yankees back to the postseason? A successful return by Piñeda [(LOL)] would be a first step, although the Yankees will likely need help from other low-salary players to make it happen if they’re going to stay under the threshold.

      Again, that’s a big if. One that sounds more unlikely by the day…”

    50. Kamieniecki
      October 5th, 2013 | 2:45 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      ‘I’m not afraid of the reality,’ Cashman said. ‘… We recognize there are some challenges that we have to deal with – and we’re up for that challenge. But I can’t tell you at the same time, “Don’t worry, it’s going to be fine.” It’s going to take some time.’

      Dec., 2005:

      “… the challenge of tackling what Brian Cashman calls ‘the toughest job in sports’ proved to be too much to pass up…

      … Cashman announced that he will return for a ninth season as the general manager of the Yankees…

      ‘Part of the process was to make sure I’m up to the challenge,’ Cashman said… ‘We have the most money, there’s no secret about that… If you combine that with the best decision-making process on a consistent basis, then God help the rest of baseball.’”

      Oct., 2013:

      “‘I’m not afraid of the reality,’ Cashman said [in his sixteenth season as the general manager of the Yankees]. ‘… We recognize there are some challenges that we have to deal with – and we’re up for that challenge. But I can’t tell you at the same time, “Don’t worry, it’s going to be fine.” It’s going to take some time.’”

    51. Mr. October
      October 5th, 2013 | 2:58 pm

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      I’m up to the challenge

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      we’re up for that challenge

      Cashman: after a 2005 ALDS loss, it’s “I” and after a 2013 fourth-place finish it’s “we.”

    52. Mr. October
      October 20th, 2013 | 3:25 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      The St. Louis Cardinals get World Series win no. 28 before The New York Yankees get American League pennant win no. 41 with Cashman. Book it.

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      You think the Cardinals will win 17 more championships before the Yankees make it back to a World Series?

      Garcia wrote:

      Yeah, some people love to speak using hyperbole as their standard speak…

      @ Garcia,
      @ MJ Recanati,
      @ Raf:

      Enjoy the 2013 World Series, gentlemen…

      That’s four St. Louis N.L. pennants won, and three Boston A.L. pennants won, since everyone in the New York Yankees’ baseball operations deptartment began reporting to Brian McGuire Cashman in 2005- with one A.L. pennant won in The Bronx.

      But who’s counting? And the Yankees could be in great shape by 2017 if everyone goes well…

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