• March 25, 1969 – The Day That Produced The Most Major League Baseball Players

    Posted by on October 10th, 2013 · Comments (13)

    The other day, I was wondering: What day produced the most players in baseball history?

    By this, I don’t mean the month and day – as I know that November 26th was when Chuck Finley and Harold Reynolds was born…but in different years.

    More so, I was looking to see what exact day – month, day and year – produced the most eventual major leaguers.

    So, I reached out to Sean Forman over at Baseball-Reference.com and he was able share the following information…

    Most common birthdays in baseball:

    | birth_month | birth_day | players |
    +-------------+-----------+---------+
    |        NULL |      NULL |     336 |
    |          11 |        18 |      74 |
    |           8 |        15 |      71 |
    |           8 |         4 |      71 |
    |           4 |         8 |      67 |
    |           8 |        30 |      67 |
    |          10 |         4 |      67 |
    |           8 |        17 |      67 |
    |          12 |        25 |      67 |
    |           9 |        22 |      67 |
    |           8 |        31 |      65 |
    |           9 |        28 |      65 |
    |          10 |         6 |      65 |
    |           7 |         8 |      64 |
    |           1 |         5 |      63 |
    |           2 |        13 |      63 |
    |           3 |        12 |      62 |
    |          10 |        14 |      62 |
    |           3 |         4 |      62 |
    |           2 |        12 |      62 |
    

    And, most major league players born on exact day:

    | year | M | D | # | names |
    +------+----+----+---+------------------------------------------------------------+
    | 1969 | 3 | 25 | 6 | 
    
    Travis Fryman, Scott Sanders, Eric Helfand, Dan Wilson, Paul Menhart, Erik Schullstrom |
    
    | 1887 | 10 | 8 | 5 |
    
    Larry Pratt, Ping Bodie, Donie Bush, Dennis Berran, Doc Crandall |
    
    | 1964 | 5 | 11 | 5 |
    
    Bill Bean, Trent Hubbard, Bobby Witt, Jeff Sellers, Floyd Youmans |
    
    | 1971 | 3 | 5 | 5 |
    
    Jose Mercedes, Brian Lesher, Brian Hunter, Jeffrey Hammonds, Chad Fonville |
    
    | 1983 | 2 | 22 | 5 |
    
    Carlos Fisher, Brian Duensing, Daniel Nava, Casey Kotchman, Arturo Lopez |
    
    | 1983 | 9 | 9 | 5 |
    
    Mike Costanzo, Rhyne Hughes, Alex Romero, Kyle Davies, Edwin Jackson |
    
    | 1987 | 1 | 21 | 5 |
    
    Roger Kieschnick, Chase d'Arnaud, Jake Diekman, Brandon Crawford, Josh Wall |
    

    So, there you have it!

    March 25th, 1969 is the day in history where the most eventual major league players was born – with six players. And, there have been a few dates to come close – with 5 players born – but, 3/25/69 is the record.  (I wonder if all those parents getting it on back in June of 1968 knew what they were doing?)

    Many, many, thanks to Sean for providing the data and the answer to this question!

    Comments on March 25, 1969 – The Day That Produced The Most Major League Baseball Players

    1. Corey
      October 10th, 2013 | 2:59 pm

      I’m sure I’m the only nerd who thinks it’s funny to see NULL,NULL at the top of the list. (Sean should have filtered this out, makes his site look incomplete)

      Hope Sean looks into those players and finds their birth date.

    2. Sweet Lou
      October 10th, 2013 | 3:50 pm

      @ Corey:
      @ Corey:
      SELECT birth_month AS “Month of Birth”, birth_day AS “Day of Birth”, COUNT(*) AS “Total Players”

      FROM

      WHERE (birth_month is NOT NULL AND birth_date IS NOT NULL)

      GROUP BY

      HAVING

    3. October 10th, 2013 | 4:00 pm

      @ Corey:
      I would bet that most of them are 19th Century players where the data is less than reliable.

    4. Corey
      October 10th, 2013 | 5:40 pm

      @ Sweet Lou:
      Well look at you. You’ve impressed me. What do you do?

    5. Corey
      October 10th, 2013 | 5:47 pm

      @ Steve L.:
      Probably. Still coulda filtered it out, as Sweet Lou pointed out. (even though they got a column wrong ;) )

    6. Sweet Lou
      October 10th, 2013 | 7:50 pm

      @ Corey:
      It was only pseudocode; I was ISNULL(NULL, “lazy”)…


      WHERE ((birth_month IS NOT NULL) AND (birth_day IS NOT NULL))

      GROUP BY birth_month, birth_day

    7. Sweet Lou
      October 10th, 2013 | 7:54 pm

      Corey wrote:

      Still coulda filtered it out

      @ Corey:
      SELECT “Agreed.”

    8. Corey
      October 10th, 2013 | 7:54 pm

      Sweet Lou wrote:

      It was only pseudocode;

      I wasn’t necessarily impressed with the simple select statement. I was more impressed because I had a completely different image of you in real life in my head.

    9. Sweet Lou
      October 10th, 2013 | 11:17 pm

      @ Corey:
      SELECT name + “: ” + “he did mean well.”
      FROM GeneralManager
      WHERE year = YEAR(GETDATE())
      AND salary >= 3000000
      AND payroll >= 235000000
      AND postseason = ‘N’
      AND idiot = ‘Y’

    10. Mr. October
      October 11th, 2013 | 11:56 am

      Sweet Lou wrote:

      SELECT name + “: ” + “he did mean well.”
      FROM GeneralManager
      WHERE year = YEAR(GETDATE())
      AND salary >= 3000000
      AND payroll >= 235000000
      AND postseason = ‘N’
      AND idiot = ‘Y’
      [ORDER BY name]

      @ Sweet Lou:
      When I run this particular SQL statment on my system, I get the following output:

      executing query…

      retrieving results…

      1 record(s) found:

      Cashman: he did mean well.
      @ Corey:

    11. Mr. October
      October 11th, 2013 | 12:27 pm

      @ Sweet Lou:
      @ Corey:
      If the WHERE clause of the original SQL statement is modified to restrict the information by year (2013) only, I get the following output:

      executing query…

      retrieving results…

      30 record(s) found:

      Alderson: he did mean well.
      Amaro, Jr.: he did mean well.
      Anthopoulos: he did mean well.
      Antonetti: he did mean well.
      Beane: he did mean well.
      Byrnes: he did mean well.
      Cashman: he did mean well.
      Cherington: he did mean well.
      Colletti: he did mean well.
      Daniels: he did mean well.
      DiPoto: he did mean well.
      Dombrowski: he did mean well.
      Duquette: he did mean well.
      Friedman: he did mean well.
      Hahn: he did mean well.
      Hill: he did mean well.
      Hoyer: he did mean well.
      Huntington: he did mean well.
      Jocketty: he did mean well.
      Luhnow: he did mean well.
      Melvin: he did mean well.
      Moore: he did mean well.
      Mozeliak: he did mean well.
      O’Dowd: he did mean well.
      Rizzo: he did mean well.
      Ryan: he did mean well.
      Sabean: he did mean well.
      Towers: he did mean well.
      Wren: he did mean well.
      Zduriencik: he did mean well.

      The results are retrieved in alphabetical order, even though an ORDER BY clause was part of either of the SQL statements – is that because there is a clustered index on GeneralManager?

      If the WHERE clause of the original SQL statement is modified to restrict the information by year (2013) and idiot (‘Y’) only, I get the following output:

      executing query…

      retrieving results…

      1 record(s) found:

      Cashman: he did mean well.

      That is, without restrictions on the salary, payroll, and postseason fields, the second modified SQL statement returns the same results as the original SQL statement. Interesting.

    12. Sweet Lou
      October 11th, 2013 | 12:38 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      The results are retrieved in alphabetical order, even though an ORDER BY clause was part of either of the SQL statements – is that because there is a clustered index on GeneralManager?

      @ Mr. October:
      I believe you meant “an ORDER BY clause was NOT a part of either…”

      Try this:
      SELECT “Brian ” + name + “: ” + “he did Meanwell.”
      FROM GeneralManager
      WHERE year = YEAR(GETDATE())
      AND idiot = ‘Y’

      See what you come up with.
      @ Corey:

    13. McMillan
      October 11th, 2013 | 8:45 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      If the WHERE clause of the original SQL statement is modified to restrict the information by year (2013) and idiot (‘Y’) only, I get the following output:
      executing query…
      retrieving results…
      1 record(s) found:
      Cashman: he did mean well.

      I’m not an I.T. person, but if Cashman is coming up in a database as the only G.M. in M.L.B. that’s an idiot, it’s likely a positive sign as far as the integrity of the data is concerned…

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.