• Oh, This Has Brian Cashman Written All Over It

    Posted by on December 27th, 2013 · Comments (65)

    Another nugget!

     

    Comments on Oh, This Has Brian Cashman Written All Over It

    1. Evan3457
      December 31st, 2013 | 6:22 pm

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      2) The Mariners wanted 2 or 3 other prospects in the deal.
      False. Irabu and Lowell, and Ryan Bradley according to some reports.

      One of three including Bradley, according to the article you yourself cited.

      @ Evan3457:
      If you break down Team Cashman’s reg. season nos. 1-3 starters’ postseason numbers (e.g. E.R.A.), and all 1995-2013 regular season nos. 1-3 starters’ postseason numbers, for the purpose of comparison with both nos. 4-5 starters and the starters of other playoff teams, you would have a better understanding of the significance of starting pitching, and it’s stronger statistical correlation to winning championships than offense, in the postseason; general summary regular season information from BaseballReference.com, or Fangraphs.com, is useless to understanding the true importance of pitching in the postseason.
      Average-to-below average postseason starting pitching quality and depth is the reason this team played .490 postseason baseball 2005-2013; not poor hitting with RISP.

      You can post this as many times as your want. I’ll still reply that it’s vastly overstated at best, and 99 44/100th% drivel at worst.

    2. Evan3457
      December 31st, 2013 | 6:22 pm

      PHMDen wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      The average ordinal of runs scored for title winners is 4.68, for runs allowed 3.68. They are within one placement of each other, giving a small, but not dominant edge to pitching.
      @ Evan3457:
      You think know more about baseball than Messrs. Silver and Perry?

      Appeal to authority.
      I’ll match Silver and Perry against Beane. Thanks for nothing.

    3. Evan3457
      December 31st, 2013 | 6:24 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      The average ordinal of runs scored for title winners is 4.68, for runs allowed 3.68. They are within one placement of each other, giving a small, but not dominant edge to pitching.
      Pathetic. You don’t know what you’re talking about.

      Uberpathetic. Disprove the statistic or shut up.
      Evan3457 wrote:
      The Yanks didn’t make a full effort to sign [Johnson]…
      Bingo.

      Why?
      If Johnson was exactly what the Yankees needed, why does it make sense for them to trade Irabu, Lowell and at least one other player, and THEN re-sign him, as opposed to just signing him.

      Answer obvious to everyone but you Sybil: Because they didn’t need Johnson at the time, and trading for him would’ve been a waste of resources.

    4. Kamieniecki
      December 31st, 2013 | 6:25 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Posted them for the Dynasty teams above. Posted them for 2013 losing teams only, above.

      No you didn’t. You don’t have these numbers; all you have is summary information from BaseballReference.com or Fangraphs.com.

      F.Y.I.:

      http://psychiatrists.psychologytoday.com/rms/prof_search.php

    5. Evan3457
      December 31st, 2013 | 6:29 pm

      PHMDen wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      Nope, it’s 2, the 1987 Twins, and 3 if you count the 1992 Jays, who finished 9th in the AL in runs allowed.
      Incorrect. The 1987 Twins and 1992 Jays were NOT below average in run prevention; the Cardinals team was.

      Incorrect. The Twins were 9 in the AL in runs allowed, 10th in the AL in ERA, and at 3.98, their runs allowed per game was worse than league average, which was 3.90 per game.

      As I myself mentioned, the Jays were slightly better than league average in runs allowed per game, but finished 9th in a 14-team AL in runs allowed.

      So you’re not only wrong, but arrogantly wrong. And that entitles you to yet another…

      http://i01.i.aliimg.com/wsphoto/v1/913714681_1/-font-b-Clown-b-font-cosplay-font-b-shoes-b-font-Boots-font-b-Custom.jpg

      Way to go, Sybil!

    6. Evan3457
      December 31st, 2013 | 6:32 pm

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      Posted them for the Dynasty teams above. Posted them for 2013 losing teams only, above.
      No you didn’t. You don’t have these numbers; all you have is summary information from BaseballReference.com or Fangraphs.com.

      I posted exactly what I said I posted. Stop lying, Sybil.

      F.Y.I.:
      http://psychiatrists.psychologytoday.com/rms/prof_search.php

      F.Y.I.
      http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/beyond-blame/201204/how-does-denial-actually-work

      Denial may not be a river in Egypt, but it is your single most important “argument” tactic. Read up and learn.

    7. Kamieniecki
      December 31st, 2013 | 6:40 pm

      @ Evan3457:
      You only make yourself look more foolish arguing that Team Cashman made the right decision not attempting to sign Randy Johnson in 1998, when Seattle would have accepted only Irabu and Lowell, or Irabu, Lowell, and Bradley for him and you claim the Mariners wanted five players for Johnson, which is not true – Seattle wanted only Irabu and Lowell according to at least one report. Once again, your ignorance of this game, and the significance of pitching in terms of postseason success, is quite apparent.

      Evan3457 wrote:

      If Johnson was exactly what the Yankees needed, why does it make sense for them to trade Irabu, Lowell and at least one other player, and THEN re-sign him, as opposed to just signing him.

      You’re an idiot. The Yankees could have made the trade contingent on the signing of Johnson, and did not.

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Appeal to authority.
      I’ll match Silver and Perry against Beane. Thanks for nothing.

      When has Beane asserted something contradictory to what was posted, genius?

      @ Evan3457:
      If you break down Team Cashman’s reg. season nos. 1-3 starters’ postseason numbers (e.g. E.R.A.), and all 1995-2013 regular season nos. 1-3 starters’ postseason numbers, for the purpose of comparison with both nos. 4-5 starters and the starters of other playoff teams, you would have a better understanding of the significance of starting pitching, and it’s stronger statistical correlation to winning championships than offense, in the postseason; general summary regular season information from BaseballReference.com, or Fangraphs.com, is useless to understanding the true importance of pitching in the postseason.
      Average-to-below average postseason starting pitching quality and depth is the reason this team played .490 postseason baseball 2005-2013; not poor hitting with RISP.

      Let me know when you’ve compiled the information…

    8. PHMDen
      December 31st, 2013 | 6:44 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Incorrect. The Twins were 9 in the AL in runs allowed, 10th in the AL in ERA, and at 3.98, their runs allowed per game was worse than league average, which was 3.90 per game.
      As I myself mentioned, the Jays were slightly better than league average in runs allowed per game, but finished 9th in a 14-team AL in runs allowed.

      Run prevention encompasses more than this.

    9. McMillan
      December 31st, 2013 | 6:47 pm

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      The Yankees could have made the trade contingent on the signing of Johnson, and did not.

      @ Kamieniecki:
      LOL – You mean you can do that??

    10. McMillan
      December 31st, 2013 | 6:53 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Because they didn’t need Johnson at the time, and trading for him would’ve been a waste of resources.


      New York didn’t need a Hall of Fame left-handed starting pitcher “at the time,” because Team Cashman already had five Hall of Fame pitchers in its rotation, including Irabu… And trading Mike Lowell for Ed Yarnall was not a waste of resources months later…

      LOL.

    11. Kamieniecki
      December 31st, 2013 | 7:24 pm

      @ Evan3457:
      Have you averaged the 2013 statistics for Sabathia, Kuroda, Pettitte, and Hughes to come up with a projection for Tanaka’s numbers in 2014 yet?

      http://waswatching.com/2010/03/30/the-javier-vazquez-question/

    12. Kamieniecki
      December 31st, 2013 | 7:35 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      In 2005, the critical bad starts were by Mussina and Wang, the Yanks #1 and #2 starters that season.
      In 2007, the critical bad starts were by Wang and Clemens, 2 for Wang. Wang was the Yanks’ ace that season, tied for 2nd in the league in wins, and 13th in ERA and 10th in WAR for pitchers. Clemens pitched poorly in game 3, but it was the only game the Yanks won in that series.
      In 2011, the Yanks’ notional ace, Sabathia, had to leave game 1 because of rain, he was mediocre at best in game 4. Nova, who pitched well in relief of Sabathia in game 1, had to leave game 5 with an injury. Garcia, the Yanks’ 3rd starter, pitched as well as CC did in game 4 in his turn in game 2, but tired in the 6th. The best start of the series turned out to be by their #4 starter, Burnett.
      In 2012, the ace, Sabathia, got knocked around. The #2 starter, Pettitte, pitched well. The #3 starter, Kuroda, also pitched a good game. The #4 starter, Hughes, was pitched decently until he left with an injury after the 3rd inning. The worst start, by far, was Sabathia’s.

      @ Evan3457:
      You just don’t get it; you’re clueless and I’m not going to explain it to you further… Happy New Year.

    13. McMillan
      December 31st, 2013 | 9:31 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      No, they didn’t. It would’ve a ridiculous misuse of assets to trade 5 guys to add 2 months of Randy Johnson to a team with already outstanding starting pitching crusing easily to a division title. Absurd point by you.

      “…Doug Melvin, the Texas Rangers’ general manager, said one of the team’s coaches received a telephone call from a friend who, he said, was in position to know these things and that the friend had said that Johnson and Timlin were going to the Yankees for Irabu, Ledee, Lowell and Bush. In addition, the Yankees were said to be signing Johnson to a three-year contract extension at $12 million a year…”

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Aside from Pettitte, the Yanks’ problem in that series were that they didn’t hit, except when Kim was in to close.

      Kim Brennan?

    14. Mr. October
      January 1st, 2014 | 10:22 am

      Stick Michael coveted Randy Johnson, and had the young pitching to acquire him in 1993, when Johnson was only 29:

      “… The Yankees probably had the best chance of giving the Mariners what they wanted for Johnson – promising young pitchers , but they abandoned their pursuit… According to the Mariners’ general manager… Gene Michael told him, ‘It didn’t look like Mr. Steinbrenner would approve a large contract for a pitcher…’

      ‘Randy wouldn’t have minded going to New York,’ his agent said…”

      http://www.nytimes.com/1993/12/10/sports/baseball-yankees-newfound-thrift-costs-them-randy-johnson.html

    15. Mr. October
      January 1st, 2014 | 10:56 am

      Evan3457 wrote:

      OK…hmmm…in thinking about it, Johnson’s post-season record is the pitching analogue of A-Rod’s. Decent, but far below his regular season record, with one overwhelmingly dominant post-season to lead his team to a title, and a couple of decent post-season series sprinkled in with a majority of failed efforts.

      If you omit Johnson’s post-season records AFTER THE AGE OF 37, the approximate age of Mark Mulder today, Johnson’s career post-season ERA was 2.82 – that’s NOT “the pitching analog of A-Rod.” Andy Pettitte’s career post-season ERA was 3.81.