• And, Now, Back To The A-Rod Mess

    Posted by on January 9th, 2014 · Comments (9)

    Via the Daily News -

    Alex Rodriguez will seek an injunction staying his suspension faster than it takes to turn a double play if arbitrator Fredric Horowitz upholds his 211-game doping ban or doesn’t slash it to A-Rod’s liking, sources familiar with the embattled slugger’s appeal have told the Daily News.

    The sources say they believe Rodriguez’s attorneys will ask a judge to issue an injunction that would allow the embattled superstar to report to the Yankees’ spring training camp next month and play when the 2014 season begins while Team A-Rod attempts to have the suspension linked to the Biogenesis drug scandal overturned in court.

    “The papers are all ready,” one source said. “They are just waiting for the announcement.”

    Rodriguez’s lawyers will likely claim that the unprecedented suspension violates federal labor law because the arbitration process was unfair and biased against A-Rod.

    Rodriguez and his advisers have been setting the table for this legal battle since last spring, alleging in interviews and in the lawsuit they filed against Major League Baseball on Oct. 3 that commissioner Bud Selig unjustly targeted the Yankees’ third baseman and that MLB investigators used unethical and illegal tactics to gather evidence to justify the ban.

    Rodriguez attorney Joe Tacopina famously stated last year that his client does not deserve to be suspended for “one inning,” but the sources say the Yankee third baseman would likely accept a suspension of 65 games or less without a fight. The legal fees to combat a 65-game ban would likely cost Rodriguez, who is scheduled to earn $25 million in 2014, more than he would lose in salary.

    A-Rod in Yankees camp? A-Rod playing with the team this year? Oh, what a mess that would be…

    Comments on And, Now, Back To The A-Rod Mess

    1. Greg H.
      January 9th, 2014 | 2:43 pm

      Shadow only knows how this ends up. I keep reading how a full season suspension is a career ending deal, but I don’t follow that. In an offhand way, if the suspension is delayed at all it’s better value for the team, no? They get more of a “younger” Arod, and end up paying for less of the later part of the contract.

    2. McMillan
      January 9th, 2014 | 3:54 pm

      If the suspension is delayed, Team Cashman is at the $189 million mark with its worst starting rotation since 1992.

    3. January 9th, 2014 | 4:22 pm

      I just hope the courts have respect for the arbitration process and quickly dismiss the case. But, I would bet that A-Rod’s camp is going to claim the process was unfair, and, then, the courts will have to look at it.

      MLB may be praying now for the ruler to stick with the suspension, and make it around 100 games – a number that A-Rod won’t want to fight because it will not be cost effective to him.

    4. Ben M.
      January 9th, 2014 | 5:24 pm

      I think A-Rod will fight ANY number, because he desperately wants to be on the field on Opening Day, and play for as long as he can stall the legal process, hopefully (in his mind) for the entire 2014 season, or at least until his (steroid-damaged?) hip gives out again, where he might call it a career anyway.

    5. Kamieniecki
      January 9th, 2014 | 7:24 pm

      Ben M. wrote:

      I think A-Rod will fight ANY number…

      Agreed. And I think that number will be 100 or 150.

    6. Corey
      January 9th, 2014 | 11:10 pm

      I think at this point, I’m rooting for chaos. I want Steinbrenner to remember this the next time he thinks about wanting to give someone a 10 year deal.

    7. Evan3457
      January 10th, 2014 | 10:19 pm

      Corey wrote:

      I think at this point, I’m rooting for chaos. I want Steinbrenner to remember this the next time he thinks about wanting to give someone a 10 year deal.

      Judging from the Cano negotiations/recriminations, I think that the Steinbrenners have learned that lesson.

    8. Kamieniecki
      January 11th, 2014 | 10:35 am

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Judging from the Cano negotiations/recriminations, I think that the Steinbrenners have learned that lesson [of giving someone a 10-year deal].

      That’s right; an organization like Team Cashman will never make a mistake like the Alex Rodriguez contract again…

      The Jeter contract before it was a disaster. And…

      In 2010, Team Cashman did not negotiate a long-term contract with a 27-year old 2nd baseman who finished third in A.L. M.V.P. voting, and did not trade the 27-year old 2nd baseman, opting to receive nothing for him in 2013…

      In 2011, Team Cashman gave Sabathia $24 million-per year only through 2017 to be paid like a no. 1 starter, and to pitch like a no. 3, or a no. 4 starter, when Team Cashman signed Sabathia to an extension…

      In 2012, Team Cashman, with a League-leading offense, kept Teixeira on the books at $22.5 million-per year only through 2016, when Teixeira’s production was in decline, and Team Cashman had an opportunity to trade him to the N.L. and was in desperate need of starting pitching and prospects…

      In 2013, Team Cashman gave Ellsbury $21.15 million-per year only through 2020, when the next-highest offer for Ellsbury’s services was in the $16-20 million range and for fewer years…

      In 2014, Team Cashman will sign a pitcher to a $100-20 million contract who has never pitched an inning in the Major Leagues, and who has almost 1400 innings in his 25-year old right arm, because Team Cashman has remained in desperate need of a true no. 1 or no. 2 starter.

      An organization like Team Cashman will never make a mistake like the Alex Rodriguez contract again… Cashman’s too good of a G.M. for that.

    9. Evan3457
      January 11th, 2014 | 11:58 am

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      Judging from the Cano negotiations/recriminations, I think that the Steinbrenners have learned that lesson [of giving someone a 10-year deal].
      That’s right; an organization like Team Cashman will never make a mistake like the Alex Rodriguez contract again…
      The Jeter contract before it was a disaster. And…
      In 2010, Team Cashman did not negotiate a long-term contract with a 27-year old 2nd baseman who finished third in A.L. M.V.P. voting, and did not trade the 27-year old 2nd baseman, opting to receive nothing for him in 2013…
      In 2011, Team Cashman gave Sabathia $24 million-per year only through 2017 to be paid like a no. 1 starter, and to pitch like a no. 3, or a no. 4 starter, when Team Cashman signed Sabathia to an extension…
      In 2012, Team Cashman, with a League-leading offense, kept Teixeira on the books at $22.5 million-per year only through 2016, when Teixeira’s production was in decline, and Team Cashman had an opportunity to trade him to the N.L. and was in desperate need of starting pitching and prospects…
      In 2013, Team Cashman gave Ellsbury $21.15 million-per year only through 2020, when the next-highest offer for Ellsbury’s services was in the $16-20 million range and for fewer years…
      In 2014, Team Cashman will sign a pitcher to a $100-20 million contract who has never pitched an inning in the Major Leagues, and who has almost 1400 innings in his 25-year old right arm, because Team Cashman has remained in desperate need of a true no. 1 or no. 2 starter.
      An organization like Team Cashman will never make a mistake like the Alex Rodriguez contract again… Cashman’s too good of a G.M. for that.

      You’re a fool to even argue theses points.

      In the first place, as everyone except you acknowledges, the 2nd A-Rod contract was Hank’s work. Which is why Hal is now in charge.

      In the second place, Jeter was signed to a 10-year deal when he was 26, not 31, as you’ve been told before, when there was 1 year left of team control via arbitration and not 3 years left on his contract, as when Cano was 27. So the two cases are NOT the same. Not remotely the same.

      In the 3rd place, the Sabathia contract was extended by 1 year, 2 years at the most, and not 10 years, from the already existing contract. At the time he had just pitched like an ace for his 3rd straight seasons with the team, and he was 30 years old. The alternative was to let his ace go, for nothing. So, he signs the ace to an extension to take him to his age 36 season, and THAT is a blunder, but failing to sign Cano a 10 year deal to take him to his age 37 season, or after 2011 to his age 38 season, or after 2012 to his age 39 season, those are also blunders. Way to take both sides of the argument, again.

      In the fourth place, the Yanks do not trade valuable players in the lineup or rotation or closing in mid-season away when they’re contenders, never have, and under the Steinbrenners, probably never will. If they wouldn’t do it in 2013, when it would’ve made much more sense, what on Earth would make them do it in 2012, when they were headed for yet another divisional title? This, again, is part of the organizational philosophy which anyone who’s a Yankee fan, except you, acknowledges exists: they will not take a down year to rebuild. The “failure” to trade Teixeira has little or nothing in common with the Cano, Jeter, Sabathia or A-Rod decisions.

      The Ellsbury signing is a free agent signing, and again, has little in common with the other decisions. In any event, you’re very vague about the competing offers, and even in the ranges you cite, the acquisition of Ellsbury is an ordinary case of slightly outbidding the market for a player a team feels it needs. This happens many times in signing the best free agents in a particular market.

      And the Tanaka signing, if the team can actually get it done, also has little or nothing to do with these other decisions. Major League Baseball actually changed its rules to make the Yankees pay through the nose (and by the way, probably ending whatever chance the team had of executing its plan to get under the $189 million salary cap) in terms of regular season salary. Had MLB not done so, there’d be no $100-$120 million contract for Tanaka. MLB didn’t feel the need to do this when the Red Sox signed Matsuzaka, or when the Rangers signed Darvish, but they did feel the need to do this to deliberately screw the Yankees.

      By the way, what an obnoxious position for a Yankee fan to be in; having to root for a major arm injury to Tanaka if the Yankees sign him, just to justify your stance on Cashman. How sad. How pathetic.

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.