• Yanks Ink Andrew Bailey

    Posted by on February 23rd, 2014 · Comments (33)

    Via CSN -

    The Yankees and Andrew Bailey have agreed to an incentive-laden minor league, Buster Olney tweets.

    Bailey had surgery in July to repair a torn labrum in his shoulder and the Red Sox were comfortable letting him walk. Bailey managed to record just 44 innings after being acquired by the Red Sox from Oakland in a 2011 winter trade.

    Following the surgery, Bailey likely won’t be ready to pitch until mid-May at the earliest.

    There were reportedly more than 15 teams interested in Bailey’s services, but in the end, the Yankees end up poaching their second Red Sox of the offseason. The Yanks signed Jacoby Ellsbury earlier in the winter.

    Born in New Jersey and went to High School there. And, he attended college on Staten Island. Expect the Yankees to work the local boy angle coming home to death…

    Consider this David Aardsma, Part II.

    Cashman specializes in this move – signing those who should be left for dead.

    Comments on Yanks Ink Andrew Bailey

    1. Raf
      February 23rd, 2014 | 12:29 pm

      FWIW, since Aardsma was released by the Yankees, he has been signed by the Marlins, Mets and Indians.

    2. February 23rd, 2014 | 2:01 pm

      Too bad Bailey won’t be ready from the get go but he may be a godsend at mid-season. Meanwhile, I’ve been waiting all weekend for Cuban SS/2nd basemen Aledmys Diaz to sign. A lot of reasons this guy would be a nice signing for NY. Some people think Yanks are favorites, so we’ll see. A lot of teams like him, mostly for his bat. Oh yeah, he’s only 23. I’m thinking this could be like NY signed him 5 years ago and he progressed through the system to the point he’s almost mlb ready. Partially make up for the yanks lack of of mlb ready talent, at least among positional players.

    3. Evan3457
      February 23rd, 2014 | 2:02 pm

      It’s a minor league deal with huge incentives if he makes it back. The shoulder capsule injury makes it unlikely that it will work, but if so, it’s a minimal amount of money being spent.

    4. February 23rd, 2014 | 2:15 pm

      Uh oh. Girardi just said (Sunday morn) that Bailey most likely won’t be ready till September. Man that sucks the excitement out of that signing, not that there was that much to begin with.

    5. February 23rd, 2014 | 4:04 pm

      Great news! Brett Gardner has signed a 4 yr. 52 mil. extension. Yanks will have best 1-2 basestealing punch in Majors not to mention turbo charged vacuum cleaners in the outfield for many years to come. Didn’n like the talk earlier this off season about Gardner leaving after this season. Yes!

    6. Corey
      February 23rd, 2014 | 4:28 pm

      @ Joseph G.:
      I’m on the opposite side of this as you. I really didn’t want to have two speed first guys in the same outfield. If the Yanks were going to extend Gardner, they should not have given Ellsbury all that money (IMO). That money could have been spent elsewhere.

      Granted, I am totally against the Ellsbury signing so I am a little biased.

    7. Corey
      February 23rd, 2014 | 5:33 pm

      I think the better move they should have done, after not signing Ellsbury at all, would have been to trade Gardner and give Granderson basically the same money to play left. That likely would have left us with a better overall team, IMO.

    8. Mr. October
      February 23rd, 2014 | 6:29 pm

      Another “poaching” by Brian Cashman – how many has it been since he “poached” Mrs. Kim Brennan? Cashman “poached” a player from a team that was “comfortable” letting that player “walk?”

    9. February 23rd, 2014 | 8:17 pm

      Joseph G. wrote:

      Great news! Brett Gardner has signed a 4 yr. 52 mil. extension. Yanks will have best 1-2 basestealing punch in Majors not to mention turbo charged vacuum cleaners in the outfield for many years to come. Didn’n like the talk earlier this off season about Gardner leaving after this season. Yes!

      I don’t like this deal at all. Way to much for a player that I think has already peaked.

    10. February 23rd, 2014 | 8:25 pm

      @ Corey:
      The wisdom of the Ellsbury deal is certainly open for debate. Ellsbury is a dynamic player when he’s at his best. One aspect of the signing I liked was forcing Boston to have to go with Jackie Bradley or Sizemore who may or may not work out. As for Jacoby’s injuries, well, those were from two collisions, not likely to repeat. It’s not like he had some chronic condition that kept him off the field. I’m looking for great outfield defense with lots of stolen bases from Gardner/Ellsbury not to mention a little more power from Jacoby in Yankee stadium.

      As for Granderson, his first 40 homer season was pretty beefy, but that second one was skin and bones. I think the Yanks got tired of all those whiffs. I know I did.

      Anyway, if this “speedy” strategy the Yanks are going with doesn’t work out you can say I told you so.:)

    11. MJ Recanati
      February 23rd, 2014 | 9:24 pm

      Corey wrote:

      That money could have been spent elsewhere.

      Honestly, I don’t think it could’ve. It’s not like there were that many free agents out there that the Yankees passed up because they allocated the money to Ellsbury. They signed McCann, Beltran, and Tanaka, and basically offered Ellsbury and Cano first crack at the same contract. The other free agents this offseason (and next) were far less appealing.

      As to your point about Granderson, I’m torn. I liked him, and I think he’d have signed for about what the Mets gave him. On the flip side, after missing the majority of the season and having a down 2012, it’s an open question as to how much of his prime is left.

    12. Corey
      February 24th, 2014 | 8:41 pm

      @ MJ Recanati:
      I’d rather have given that money (plus the difference to whatever it took to get him) to Cano. Or, hell, even saved it for a salary dump at the deadline or even saved that money till next year.

      Ellsbury isn’t a 20 millon dollar a year player. This is like Johnny Damon all over again for me.

    13. February 24th, 2014 | 9:46 pm

      Joseph Maloney wrote:

      Joseph G. wrote:
      Great news! Brett Gardner has signed a 4 yr. 52 mil. extension. Yanks will have best 1-2 basestealing punch in Majors not to mention turbo charged vacuum cleaners in the outfield for many years to come. Didn’n like the talk earlier this off season about Gardner leaving after this season. Yes!
      I don’t like this deal at all. Way to much for a player that I think has already peaked.

      I’d like to think Gardner is getting better with experience and is starting to figure it all out. Hopefully, his best years are ahead of him.

    14. Mr. October
      February 24th, 2014 | 9:48 pm

      Joseph G. wrote:

      I think the Yanks got tired of all those whiffs.

      What whiffs? The 549 whiffs in 2148 regular season plate appearances? Are those the whiffs you’re referring to?

    15. Mr. October
      February 24th, 2014 | 10:11 pm

      Raf wrote:

      FWIW

      Not much…

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      … it’s an open question as to how much of [Granderson's] prime is left.

      He didn’t have much of a prime to begin with…

    16. MJ Recanati
      February 25th, 2014 | 4:14 pm

      Corey wrote:

      I’d rather have given that money (plus the difference to whatever it took to get him) to Cano. Or, hell, even saved it for a salary dump at the deadline or even saved that money till next year.

      Cano won’t be worth it. Second basemen just don’t age well.

      Corey wrote:

      This is like Johnny Damon all over again for me.

      Johnny Damon more than did the job in New York.

    17. MJ Recanati
      February 25th, 2014 | 4:41 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      He didn’t have much of a prime to begin with…

      And yet Granderson is one of only nine players in baseball history to have played at least 80% of his games in centerfield, with an AVG at least .261, an OBP at least .340, an OPS+ at least 117, and at least 217 career HR’s. The other eight players that meet this criteria are Willie Mays, Ken Griffey Jr., Jim Edmonds, Joe DiMaggio, Fred Lynn, Bernie Williams, Lary Doby, and Earl Averill. Five Hall of Famers and three multiple All-Stars.

      For a guy that never had much of a prime, that’s pretty good company.

    18. Mr. October
      February 25th, 2014 | 5:05 pm

      @ MJ Recanati:
      And Ken Griffey, Jr. was the player with “the amazing power/speed combo” whom “the legacy of Mickey Mantle” passed to, right? Wow… I learn so much about baseball on this “ever-worsening” site.

    19. Mr. October
      February 25th, 2014 | 6:13 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      And yet Granderson is one of only nine players in baseball history to have played at least 80% of his games in centerfield, with an AVG at least .261, an OBP at least .340, an OPS+ at least 117, and at least 217 career HR’s. The other eight players that meet this criteria are Willie Mays, Ken Griffey Jr., Jim Edmonds, Joe DiMaggio, Fred Lynn, Bernie Williams, Lary Doby, and Earl Averill. Five Hall of Famers and three multiple All-Stars.
      For a guy that never had much of a prime, that’s pretty good company.

      @ MJ Recanati:
      What position will Kurtis Granderson be playing for the New York Mets this year, with Lagares in CF? And we’re going to put Kurtis Granderson in the same company with Joseph Paul DiMaggio, because up to this point, Kurtis has played 80% of his career in CF? The closest Granderson will come to belonging in the same company with DiMaggio will be when he strikes out swinging on a ball in the dirt in 56 consecutive games, or in 72 out of 73 games, assuming he hasn’t done it yet.

    20. Mr. October
      February 25th, 2014 | 6:14 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Cano won’t be worth it. Second basemen just don’t age well.

      But Ellsbury will be worth it…

    21. MJ Recanati
      February 25th, 2014 | 6:52 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      this “ever-worsening” site.

      Yep…a job well done for killing this place for everyone but Steve and your six other personalities.

      Send my regards to Ricketson and the rest of the voices in your head.

    22. Mr. October
      February 25th, 2014 | 7:02 pm

      @ MJ Recanati:
      Do you recall the name of the thread within which you worked out that great WAR analysis of the Sheffield-for-Humberto Sanchez trade? I’d like to bookmark it for reference purposes…

    23. Evan3457
      February 25th, 2014 | 10:30 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      Raf wrote:
      FWIW
      Not much…
      MJ Recanati wrote:
      … it’s an open question as to how much of [Granderson's] prime is left.
      He didn’t have much of a prime to begin with…

      From 2006 through 2011 (ages 25 through 30) Granderson was 9th in all of Major League Baseball in fWAR (11th in bWAR).

      That’s a pretty decent prime.

    24. Mr. October
      February 26th, 2014 | 12:49 am

      Evan3457 wrote:

      From 2006 through 2011 (ages 25 through 30) Granderson was 9th in all of Major League Baseball in fWAR (11th in bWAR).
      That’s a pretty decent prime.

      Kute.

    25. Greg H.
      February 26th, 2014 | 11:01 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Mr. October wrote:
      this “ever-worsening” site.
      Yep…a job well done for killing this place for everyone but Steve and your six other personalities.
      Send my regards to Ricketson and the rest of the voices in your head.

      I second that emotion.

    26. Mr. October
      February 26th, 2014 | 4:44 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      From 2006 through 2011 (ages 25 through 30) Granderson was 9th in all of Major League Baseball in fWAR (11th in bWAR).

      And Brian Kashman, of Kourse, picKed Kurtis Granderson up at the age of 29, or with months left in his “prime” It’s a shame the Brian Kashman farm system, or Major League roster, didn’t have enough talent “at the time” to aKquire Max Scherzer with Ian Kennedy, or talent of more value to Arizona than Edwin JacKson to Kouple with Kennedy, since Kennedy was the “asset” Arizona was primarily interested in “at the time.”

    27. Evan3457
      February 26th, 2014 | 6:48 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      From 2006 through 2011 (ages 25 through 30) Granderson was 9th in all of Major League Baseball in fWAR (11th in bWAR).
      And Brian Kashman, of Kourse, picKed Kurtis Granderson up at the age of 29, or with months left in his “prime” It’s a shame the Brian Kashman farm system, or Major League roster, didn’t have enough talent “at the time” to aKquire Max Scherzer with Ian Kennedy, or talent of more value to Arizona than Edwin JacKson to Kouple with Kennedy, since Kennedy was the “asset” Arizona was primarily interested in “at the time.”

      Two of the four seasons Granders on was with the team was part of that prime. He averaged 5 bWAR in his first two seasons (4.5 and 5.4). A 5 bWAR player is loosely described as an All-Star by the website itself.

      Oh, and way to change the subject.

      The original “argument” you made was that Granderson’s prime was inconsequential. It was actually quite good; 9th (or 11th) best player in baseball over those 6 years, as simply estimated by cumulative bWAR of fWAR.

      As for the trade, the Yanks didn’t have a relatively inexpensive 25-year-old starter coming off what was then a career year as the Tigers did with Edwin Jackson to throw in the deal. Jackson didn’t have a signed contract at the time, but he was two seasons from free agency.

      The Tigers were in the position of having missed the playoffs, and would do so again in 2010. The Tigers, like all other teams except the Yankees, are allowed to take a down year or two to rebuild. If the Yankees had a 25-year old starter with two years of team control left and had just turned in a 4 WAR season, they wouldn’t have traded him for anything, because said pitcher would be locked into their rotation for at least another year.

      It is a tactical advantage the Yankees deny themselves because of their corporate philosophy that they must field a title contender every year.

    28. Mr. October
      February 26th, 2014 | 7:16 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      It is a tactical advantage the Yankees deny themselves because of their corporate philosophy that they must field a title contender every year.

      LOL…

      Excellent point: the Yankees “deny themselves” the “tactical advantage” of having a productive farm system, or one better than 20th in MLB, because it’s their “corporate philosophy” to win one AL Pennant every 10 years…

      What is the over/under in Las Vegas on Kurtis Granderson’s striKeout total for the 2014 Kampaign, playing right field for the New YorK Mets and behind one of the finest young pitching staffs in MLB built, by GM Sandy Alderson (no relation to Harness Racing Hall of Fame legend and long-time Wilpon personal friend and business partner or associate, John Alderson)?

    29. Evan3457
      February 26th, 2014 | 8:08 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      It is a tactical advantage the Yankees deny themselves because of their corporate philosophy that they must field a title contender every year.
      LOL…

      LMAO at your LOL at an accurate and relevant point.

      Excellent point: the Yankees “deny themselves” the “tactical advantage” of having a productive farm system, or one better than 20th in MLB, because it’s their “corporate philosophy” to win one AL Pennant every 10 years…

      I call the above blockquoted a straw man (actually two straw men) for a simple reason: they are straw men arguments. The term is correctly used.

      Oh, forgot to LMAO again.

      What is the over/under in Las Vegas on Kurtis Granderson’s striKeout total for the 2014 Kampaign, playing right field for the New YorK Mets and behind one of the finest young pitching staffs in MLB built, by GM Sandy Alderson (no relation to Harness Racing Hall of Fame legend and long-time Wilpon personal friend and business partner or associate, John Alderson)?

      Who cares? Not part of the argument in which you tried to make the preposterous claim that Granderson’s prime was without significant value. If he never has another even halfway decent season in the majors, that doesn’t mean he wasn’t a good player in his prime, because he obviously was.

      FWIW, The Steamer and Oliver projection systems project him for 158 and 177 K’s in seasons of roughly 600 PA. The ZIPS system says only 123 K, but it gives him only about 475 PA, so it’s in line with the other two.

    30. Mr. October
      February 27th, 2014 | 8:43 pm

      @ Evan3457:
      FYI: I made a resolution for the New Year (2014) to not have “‘arguements’ (sic)” with people who can not read or write, and I’m going to stick with it going forward… But, by all means, continue to run your posts through a spell-checking program as you’ve been doing for the past several weeks.

    31. Mr. October
      February 27th, 2014 | 9:17 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      … they are straw men arguments.

      That’s the problem with cheap spell-checking programs: they don’t catch things like this…

    32. Evan3457
      March 2nd, 2014 | 1:47 am

      Mr. October wrote:

      @ Evan3457:
      FYI: I made a resolution for the New Year (2014) to not have “‘arguements’ (sic)” with people who can not read or write, and I’m going to stick with it going forward… But, by all means, continue to run your posts through a spell-checking program as you’ve been doing for the past several weeks.

      No, I haven’t.

      I’ve made a resolution to challenge your bullspit whenever I see a reason to. And there’s usually a good reason to.

    33. Evan3457
      March 2nd, 2014 | 1:48 am

      Mr. October wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      … they are straw men arguments.
      That’s the problem with cheap spell-checking programs: they don’t catch things like this…

      And, as I point out to you every time you make this point, straw man is an accepted variant of strawman.

      Thanks for playing.