• No Faith In Jesus

    Posted by on February 28th, 2014 · Comments (5)

    Via the Seattle Times -

    Jesus Montero is the forgotten prospect. He’s no longer something to build on. He’s something to be salvaged. To many around baseball and within the organization, he’s just another guy filled with potential, but unaware that he’s squandering it.

    This should have been a seminal offseason for Montero. He was coming off one of the worst years of his professional career. He was given the starting catching job in the offseason, lost it two weeks into the season, was sent to Triple A in May and told he was converting to first base, he injured his knee requiring surgery and then after coming back for a handful of games he was suspended for the remainder of the season for being linked to the BioGenesis.

    It was a full year of disappointment.

    For most players, a season like that would be the ultimate motivation. For most players, they would take the offseason to prepare like they’ve never prepared before and come to camp ready to have writers pump out the “best shape of his life” stories.

    Instead, Montero came in heavier than ever. He even admitted it, making the regrettable line: “after winter ball, all I did was eat.”

    After each season, players meet with training and medical staff to set up their offseason. Each player is given a target weight they are expected to come in at for the following season. According to sources, Montero has never once met that target weight since joining the Mariners. This year he came in 40 pounds over the weight the Mariners wanted him to come in at.

    It’s led to frustration within the organization. General manager Jack Zduriencik was particularly critical of Montero and his future.

    “We are disappointed in how he came in physically,” Zduriencik said bluntly.

    That disinterest in conditioning in the offseason didn’t do much change the minds of people who have been skeptical of Montero’s work ethic. It certainly didn’t inspire Zduriencik, who was clearly unhappy with the situation.

    “It’s up to him,” Zduriencik said. ” I have zero expectations for Jesus Montero. Any expectations I had are gone.”

    Hmmm…Dr. Evil likes them big and hairy!

    Comments on No Faith In Jesus

    1. EHawk
      February 28th, 2014 | 3:31 pm

      Might go down as a steal of a trade for the Yanks if Montero is a bust like it seems and Pineda turns it around and is as good as they say he looks this spring. At least Yanks aren’t giving up on Pineda like it seems the Mariners are on Montero.

    2. February 28th, 2014 | 4:09 pm

      M’s got rid of Pineda for a reason. We got a taste of it last year. More to come…

    3. Ben M.
      February 28th, 2014 | 5:18 pm

      It seems like both sides tried to hoodwink each other. Before he got hurt, Pineda also came in way overweight in his first spring with the Yankees after the trade. Perhaps BOTH players have attitude issues that might’ve been kept hidden. I no longer expect anything from either one.

    4. Raf
      March 1st, 2014 | 12:06 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      M’s got rid of Pineda for a reason.

      Yeah, they needed offense.

      http://www.ussmariner.com/2012/01/13/pineda-trade-sets-team-up-to-do-more/

      In swapping Pineda for Montero, the team has decided to move strength for weakness. The organization has a lot of talent on the mound and not much talent at the plate, so the appeal of this kind of deal is fairly obvious. I argued that the M’s should make exactly this type of trade over the summer, and then shipping Pineda off was part of my off-season plan back in November. While he’s a talented guy, he’s not an irreplaceable talent, and the risks associated with building around young pitching are substantial and well chronicled.

    5. Mr. October
      March 1st, 2014 | 3:46 pm

      It’s interesting that Derek Jeter didn’t call Dr. Evil to inform him of his intention to post his letter and notice of retirement on Facebook, with Cashman having been Jeter’s GM for 16 years of Jeter’s career. One would think a man of Jeter’s character and reputation would have a developed a closer relationship with a gentleman like Cashman over that time…

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.