• Yangervis Solarte

    Posted by on March 5th, 2014 · Comments (10)

    Sounds like a cheap bottle of sangria to me. More via Bryan Hoch:

    Yangervis Solarte spent all of last season waiting for a call that never came.

    The switch-hitter said that he had been told that the Rangers planned to bring him up at the end of the season, a nod to his solid performance at Triple-A Round Rock. But the 26-year-old instead flew home to Venezuela still waiting for his first day of big league service time.

    “I don’t even want to mention the word ‘Triple-A’ at this moment,” Solarte said through an interpreter. “My dream is to play in the Majors. I got very hurt when I did not get called up to the Majors last year, so I feel that I can’t get my heart broken like that again.”

    A non-roster invitee, Solarte’s live bat and versatility have opened some eyes this spring in Yankees camp. Solarte entered Tuesday with six hits in seven Grapefruit League at-bats, including two homers.

    Yankees manager Joe Girardi has had Solarte play multiple positions, using him at second base, third base, shortstop and left field. Solarte said that his favorite position is shortstop, but he has played mostly second base as a professional.

    “I’ve said, if you have a uniform on and you can play different positions, you have a chance,” Girardi said. “He’s going to get a good look. He’s got some versatility. We’re looking for versatility, because of our infield situation, and he has that.”

    “That’s one of my abilities as a player, that flexibility,” Solarte said. “I feel like they are taking that into account. My defense is one of the things that I would really like to work on very hard during the spring.”

    Solarte said that he never sought an explanation why the Rangers did not call him up in 2013, saying that it was not his place to question those decisions. Solarte hit .276 with 12 homers and 75 RBIs in 133 games at Triple-A.

    “Our infield situation.” That’s being polite, isn’t it?

    Comments on Yangervis Solarte

    1. Raf
      March 5th, 2014 | 9:32 pm

      Sounds like he may fit the supersub role they’ve been trying to place Nuñez in.

    2. Scout
      March 6th, 2014 | 4:24 pm

      Sorry, but .276 in the hitter-friendly PCL doesn’t impress me. I’ll wait to see how he does when the pitchers are closer to being ready for the season.

    3. MJ Recanati
      March 7th, 2014 | 12:06 pm

      Scout wrote:

      Sorry, but .276 in the hitter-friendly PCL doesn’t impress me.

      What about .315 in the pitcher-friendly Eastern League?

      And, anyway, he’s being looked at as a bench player, right?

    4. Greg H.
      April 9th, 2014 | 4:53 pm

      Steve, don’t look now, but your cheap bottle of sangria is hitting .458 so far.

    5. April 9th, 2014 | 10:52 pm

      Greg H. wrote:

      Steve, don’t look now, but your cheap bottle of sangria is hitting .458 so far.

      Kevin Youkilis got off to a hot start in 2013. Ditto Travis Hafner and Vernon Wells. Sometimes, you have to wait a while…

    6. MJ Recanati
      April 10th, 2014 | 12:37 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      Sometimes, you have to wait a while…

      That’s very true…which is why your runs scored/strength-of-schedule post is absurd this early in the season.

    7. April 10th, 2014 | 12:54 pm

      @ MJ Recanati:
      It still does demonstrate that they are off to a bad start.

    8. MJ Recanati
      April 10th, 2014 | 1:34 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      It still does demonstrate that they are off to a bad start.

      It’s the other side of the same coin you just poo-poohed directly above. A good start or a bad start after nine game smeans absolutely nothing whether we’re talking about a team or a player.

    9. MJ Recanati
      April 10th, 2014 | 1:34 pm

      *games means

    10. Mr. October
      April 10th, 2014 | 3:25 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      It’s the other side of the same coin you just poo-poohed…

      @ MJ Recanati:
      Well, actually, it isn’t. One post is in reference to a 26-year old rookie hitting .458 through nine games against mediocre pitching, and a second post is in reference to the average margin of victory and strength of schedule used determine number of runs per game better than an average team a team is. It’s not the other side of the same coin – no mathematician or logician would ever let you get away with that… Team Cashman will finish much closer to .444 than Solarte will finish to .458.

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