• Romine Moving?

    Posted by on March 8th, 2014 · Comments (73)

    I guess the Yankees think he’s soft, injury prone, or can’t hit – or some combination therein.

    Comments on Romine Moving?

    1. KPOcala
      March 19th, 2014 | 1:05 pm

      @ Evan3457: Yeah, the Braves should one a lot of Rings with pitching, although we know that it isn’t really fair. The Yanks may have beaten them, but it seemed like every win was “a game of inches”. Which is part and parcel why it’s unfair to judge teams in ANY sport with respect to “Rings”. Elway was kinda of a “bum” until he got his, Marino never did, and he gets the “goat horns”. Sports “analysis” has gotten to be ridiculous, really….

    2. KPOcala
      March 19th, 2014 | 1:09 pm

      @ Mr. October: Really? You’d trade a top hitter for a top pitcher knowing the inherent risks in pitcher breakdown? Bill James has written a lot over the last thirty years on this subject. I’ll defer to James. I’m glad you don’t manage my money.

    3. KPOcala
      March 19th, 2014 | 1:18 pm

      @ Mr. October: The Unit wouldn’t sign with the Yankees, period. Actually Dombrowski didn’t go to Boston, I must have been thinking of Duquette, so BAD on both of us.

      As for Cashman being in a “no win” situation, you unwittingly made my point. He either ‘inherited’ “this”, or was “In Place” during “that”, or when he got “full autonomy”, he winds up being “Hanked”. Ok, you hate the man, and are fortunate to have 20/20 hindsight. You need some self-reflection.

    4. Mr. October
      March 19th, 2014 | 9:50 pm

      KPOcala wrote:

      Really? You’d trade a top hitter for a top pitcher knowing the inherent risks in pitcher breakdown?

      @ KPOcala:
      I didn’t say that.

    5. Mr. October
      March 19th, 2014 | 9:52 pm

      KPOcala wrote:

      The Unit wouldn’t sign with the Yankees, period.

      Really? I must have missed that… Where was it reported that Brian Cashman attempted to sign Johnson to a contract extension, unsuccessfully, in 1998?

    6. KPOcala
      March 20th, 2014 | 12:55 am

      @ Mr. October:
      Evan3457 wrote:
      If baseball is all about pitching, then teams would… trade top hitters for top pitchers all the time.
      (Mr. October):That makes a lot of sense…

      Apparently, you did.

    7. KPOcala
      March 20th, 2014 | 12:56 am

      @ Mr. October: “Contract Extension”? How does that work, given that he wasn’t on the team?

    8. KPOcala
      March 20th, 2014 | 1:00 am

      @ Evan3457:Thanks for the support. This is “patience and logic therapy for me, but it’s closer to a “nut house” 😉

    9. KPOcala
      March 20th, 2014 | 1:05 am

      @ Mr. October:
      Cashman didn’t want The Big Unit in 1998 before The Big Unit went on to win four (4) consecutive Cy Young Awards; he convinced George Steinbrenner to not pursue a contract extension that would have brought Johnson to The Bronx. Cashman, in ’98, essentially “overruled” George?! LOL, your statement needs no “rebuttal”.

    10. KPOcala
      March 20th, 2014 | 1:06 am

      I’ve already had two illuminating posts deleted from this thread. I find it “interesting”…….

    11. Evan3457
      March 20th, 2014 | 3:28 am

      The Yankees were in trade talks for Johnson in 1998 only to make sure he didn’t go to an AL rival. The Yanks already had the best pitching in baseball in 1998; the best starting pitching, and the best bullpen. They had no need to trade at least 3 prospects for Johnson so they could knock Pettitte, Wells, Cone or El Duque out of the post-season rotation. (At the trading deadline in 1998, the Yanks were 15 games in 1st, and well on their way to the post-season; they didn’t need to add Johnson to get there.)

      They stayed in the trade talks to make sure that Boston, Cleveland or Texas didn’t get Johnson. When the Astros made their big offer to the Mariners and the AL rivals dropped out of the bidding for Johnson, so did the Yankees. And rightly so.

    12. March 20th, 2014 | 9:11 am

      KPOcala wrote:

      I’ve already had two illuminating posts deleted from this thread. I find it “interesting”…….

      I did not delete anything. And, there’s nothing in the pending folder waiting for approval.

    13. Mr. October
      March 20th, 2014 | 8:50 pm

      KPOcala wrote:

      @ Mr. October:
      “Contract Extension”? How does that work, given that he wasn’t on the team?

      @ KPOcala:
      I’m not surprised your friend didn’t take the time to explain something to you that is an inconvenient fact under the circumstances: a transaction or agreement can be contingent upon the negotiation of a contract extension. It seems you guys didn’t have all of the facts before you went on record arguing that The Yankee Swordsman made the right move…

      “Let’s review, shall we:”

      In 1993, Gene Michael had an agreement in place to acquire Randy Johnson for two prospects, but Mr. Steinbrenner was reluctant to take on Johnson’s salary…

      In 1998, Mr. Steinbrenner was interested in acquiring Johnson, and Seattle offered Johnson for Lowell, Irabu, and perhaps one other prospect, according to various reports… Brian Cashman’s interest in Johnson was centered on preventing Johnson’s trade to an AL team; at no time did Cashman take the opportunity to negotiate a contract extension with Johnson once an agreement was largely in place with Seattle on its terms or before it became apparent Johnson would be traded to an NL team if a deal was not made. The Yankee Swordsman convinced Steinbrenner to pass on the deal…

      Look it up.

      Cashman congratulated himself on not acquiring Johnson after the 1998 season and a world championship won with a team Gene Michael built. And Brian “You Can Never Have Enough Pitching” Cashman did not pursue Johnson as a free agent in the 1998-99 offseason, either, although he did trade the left-handed Wells for Clemens.

      In 1999, Cashman traded a then 24-year-old Lowell to the Marlins for three young pitchers: Noel, Yarnall, and Johnson. You can do the research yourself on how well this trade, Cashman’s first with Dombrowski, turned out. Also in 1999, Johnson won a Cy Young Award with his new team, Arizona.

      In 2000, Johnson won a second-consecutive Cy Young Award.

      In 2001, Johnson won a third-consecutive Cy Young Award, and was the World Series MVP in the 2001 World Series against Team Cashman.

      In 2002, Johnson won a fourth-consecutive Cy Young Award, and Cashman traded a pitcher named Ted Lilly (acquired in a deal for Irabu), for a pitcher named Jeff Weaver. You can do the research yourself on how well this trade with Beane turned out, too…

      In 2003, Team Cashman lost the World Series to the Florida Marlins.

      In 2004-05, “[Team Cashman’s] financial obligation in their acquisition of Randy Johnson ballooned to about $57 million… when the team signed the 41-year-old left-hander to a two-year contract extension and Johnson formally waived his no-trade clause to agree to the deal.

      Johnson’s contract extension, which was considered a formality when the teams agreed to the trade last week, will pay him a combined $32 million in 2006 and 2007; he will be 45 when the contract runs out…”

      http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A53308-2005Jan6.html

      In 2007, “… the Yankees… traded Johnson to Arizona… returning the pitcher they could not live without just two years ago… [the move was not] announced, because the Diamondbacks must formalize a contract extension for Johnson

      At 4 p.m. yesterday, the Diamondbacks began a 72-hour negotiating window with Johnson to complete the trade… The Yankees have imported many stars since their last World Series victory, in 2000, but no combination has resulted in a championship…”

      http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/05/sports/baseball/05yanks.html?fta=y

      I neglected to mention that Cashman, offered a young prospect by the name of Robinson Cano, to Arizona in the 2004 deal.

      Look it up. Cashman had no interest in acquiring a pitcher in 1998 who would go on to win four consecutive Cy Young Awards, as long as that pitcher didn’t go to an AL team… Cashman then went on to convert those trade pieces into Ed Yarnall and Jeff Weaver…

      @ KPOcala:
      You mentioned Sheffield…

      Would you like to review the 2006-07 Sheffield trade, too, while we’re at it?

      The Yankee Swordsman exercised an option on Sheffield’s contract for the sole purpose of trading Sheffield, pissing Sheffield off, and then proceeded to trade Sheffield to Detroit for three worthless pitchers, two with arm problems. Another great trade Cashman made with Dombowski…

    14. Mr. October
      March 21st, 2014 | 12:01 am

      @ KPOcala:
      “… The Yankees probably had the best chance of giving the Mariners what they wanted for [Randy] Johnson – promising young pitchers – but they abandoned their pursuit… According to… the Mariners’ general manager, Gene Michael… told him, ‘It didn’t look like Mr. Steinbrenner would approve a large contract for a pitcher…'”

      http://www.nytimes.com/1993/12/10/sports/baseball-yankees-newfound-thrift-costs-them-randy-johnson.html

      “… the Texas Rangers’ general manager, said one of the team’s coaches received a telephone call from a friend who, he said, was in position to know these things and that the friend had said that Johnson and Timlin were going to the Yankees for Irabu, Ledee, Lowell and Bush. In addition, the Yankees were said to be signing Johnson to a three-year contract extension at $12 million a year…”

      August 1, 1998:

      “The Yankees could have had Randy Johnson tonight. Yankees [general moron] Brian Cashman could have called the Seattle Mariners and agreed to their demands, and Johnson, one of this generation’s best pitchers, would have joined George Steinbrenner’s juggernaut…”

      Instead, the Yankees decided to pass on Johnson, refusing Seattle’s request for [Irabu, Lowell] and a second Class A player…

      http://www.nytimes.com/1998/08/01/sports/baseball-with-johnson-there-for-the-taking-yanks-balked.html

      The month of July, 1998 came and went with Johnson on the trade market and with the Yankees having the trade pieces to acquire Johnson – at one point it was even reported that Johnson was to sign a three-year contract extension to pitch in New York through 2000. In the 1998-99 offseason, Team Cashman did not make a serious attempt to sign Johnson as a free agent… And the rest is history…

    15. Evan3457
      March 21st, 2014 | 12:06 am

      Mr. October wrote:

      KPOcala wrote:
      @ Mr. October:
      “Contract Extension”? How does that work, given that he wasn’t on the team?
      @ KPOcala:
      I’m not surprised your friend didn’t take the time to explain something to you that is an inconvenient fact under the circumstances: a transaction or agreement can be contingent upon the negotiation of a contract extension. It seems you guys didn’t have all of the facts before you went on record arguing that The Yankee Swordsman made the right move…
      “Let’s review, shall we:”
      In 1993, Gene Michael had an agreement in place to acquire Randy Johnson for two prospects, but Mr. Steinbrenner was reluctant to take on Johnson’s salary…
      In 1998, Mr. Steinbrenner was interested in acquiring Johnson, and Seattle offered Johnson for Lowell, Irabu, and perhaps one other prospect, according to various reports… Brian Cashman’s interest in Johnson was centered on preventing Johnson’s trade to an AL team; at no time did Cashman take the opportunity to negotiate a contract extension with Johnson once an agreement was largely in place with Seattle on its terms or before it became apparent Johnson would be traded to an NL team if a deal was not made. The Yankee Swordsman convinced Steinbrenner to pass on the deal…
      Look it up.
      Cashman congratulated himself on not acquiring Johnson after the 1998 season and a world championship won with a team Gene Michael built. And Brian “You Can Never Have Enough Pitching” Cashman did not pursue Johnson as a free agent in the 1998-99 offseason, either, although he did trade the left-handed Wells for Clemens.
      In 1999, Cashman traded a then 24-year-old Lowell to the Marlins for three young pitchers: Noel, Yarnall, and Johnson. You can do the research yourself on how well this trade, Cashman’s first with Dombrowski, turned out. Also in 1999, Johnson won a Cy Young Award with his new team, Arizona.
      In 2000, Johnson won a second-consecutive Cy Young Award.
      In 2001, Johnson won a third-consecutive Cy Young Award, and was the World Series MVP in the 2001 World Series against Team Cashman.
      In 2002, Johnson won a fourth-consecutive Cy Young Award, and Cashman traded a pitcher named Ted Lilly (acquired in a deal for Irabu), for a pitcher named Jeff Weaver. You can do the research yourself on how well this trade with Beane turned out, too…
      In 2003, Team Cashman lost the World Series to the Florida Marlins.
      In 2004-05, “[Team Cashman’s] financial obligation in their acquisition of Randy Johnson ballooned to about $57 million… when the team signed the 41-year-old left-hander to a two-year contract extension and Johnson formally waived his no-trade clause to agree to the deal.
      …Johnson’s contract extension, which was considered a formality when the teams agreed to the trade last week, will pay him a combined $32 million in 2006 and 2007; he will be 45 when the contract runs out…”
      http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A53308-2005Jan6.html
      In 2007, “… the Yankees… traded Johnson to Arizona… returning the pitcher they could not live without just two years ago… [the move was not] announced, because the Diamondbacks must formalize a contract extension for Johnson…
      At 4 p.m. yesterday, the Diamondbacks began a 72-hour negotiating window with Johnson to complete the trade… The Yankees have imported many stars since their last World Series victory, in 2000, but no combination has resulted in a championship…”
      http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/05/sports/baseball/05yanks.html?fta=y
      I neglected to mention that Cashman, offered a young prospect by the name of Robinson Cano, to Arizona in the 2004 deal.
      Look it up. Cashman had no interest in acquiring a pitcher in 1998 who would go on to win four consecutive Cy Young Awards, as long as that pitcher didn’t go to an AL team… Cashman then went on to convert those trade pieces into Ed Yarnall and Jeff Weaver…
      @ KPOcala:
      You mentioned Sheffield…
      Would you like to review the 2006-07 Sheffield trade, too, while we’re at it?
      The Yankee Swordsman exercised an option on Sheffield’s contract for the sole purpose of trading Sheffield, pissing Sheffield off, and then proceeded to trade Sheffield to Detroit for three worthless pitchers, two with arm problems. Another great trade Cashman made with Dombowski…

      All of this is well known, has been discussed here multiple times, and none of it has any impact on what I said in my previous post in this thread.

    16. Evan3457
      March 21st, 2014 | 12:07 am

      Mr. October wrote:

      @ KPOcala:
      “… The Yankees probably had the best chance of giving the Mariners what they wanted for [Randy] Johnson – promising young pitchers – but they abandoned their pursuit… According to… the Mariners’ general manager, Gene Michael… told him, ‘It didn’t look like Mr. Steinbrenner would approve a large contract for a pitcher…’”
      http://www.nytimes.com/1993/12/10/sports/baseball-yankees-newfound-thrift-costs-them-randy-johnson.html
      “… the Texas Rangers’ general manager, said one of the team’s coaches received a telephone call from a friend who, he said, was in position to know these things and that the friend had said that Johnson and Timlin were going to the Yankees for Irabu, Ledee, Lowell and Bush. In addition, the Yankees were said to be signing Johnson to a three-year contract extension at $12 million a year…”
      August 1, 1998:
      “The Yankees could have had Randy Johnson tonight. Yankees [general moron] Brian Cashman could have called the Seattle Mariners and agreed to their demands, and Johnson, one of this generation’s best pitchers, would have joined George Steinbrenner’s juggernaut…”
      Instead, the Yankees decided to pass on Johnson, refusing Seattle’s request for [Irabu, Lowell] and a second Class A player…
      http://www.nytimes.com/1998/08/01/sports/baseball-with-johnson-there-for-the-taking-yanks-balked.html
      The month of July, 1998 came and went with Johnson on the trade market and with the Yankees having the trade pieces to acquire Johnson – at one point it was even reported that Johnson was to sign a three-year contract extension to pitch in New York through 2000. In the 1998-99 offseason, Team Cashman did not make a serious attempt to sign Johnson as a free agent… And the rest is history…

      Same here.

    17. KPOcala
      March 21st, 2014 | 12:36 am

      @ Mr. October:And you seriously believe, that in 1998, Cashman really had that kind of pull? You can “cite” all you like, but that’s no reflective of “reality”. And what why would Cashman NOT trade Johnson in 2007, an old, unhappy pitcher with a nasty disposition? I seem to remember the ridicule that Cashman took for “HIS signing” after Johnson didn’t win another two Cy Youngs, but still had a “reasonably good” two year stint, going 34-19, with decent peripherals (especially his first season). I mean, the man played those two years at ages 41-42, and Yankee fans were pissed! Then you criticize Cashman for dealing him away, at age 43 for Alberto Gonzalez, Steven Jackson, Ross Ohlendorf and Luis Vizcaino, players who either played well for a time, and/or were used in trades for some “pieces”. Considering he was trading a player who took “silicone” injections in his knees, had disks in his back which he was taking shots, INTO, the spine for, Cashman got a “haul”. Oh, and speaking of trades, let’s go back to Sheffield. Having played 33 games for the Yankees in his final season age 37 (turning THIRTY-EIGHT), he was traded for Anthony Claggett, Humberto Sanchez and Kevin Whelan. Sanchez at the time, was considered a “True Prospect”, in all my preseason books on “prospects”. That Sanchez blew out was hardly a “coup” for Dombrowski, Sheffield’s career melted into “irrelevancy”. To the point, had Cashman NOT traded Sheffield and Johnson when he did, you’d (rightly)be heckling Cashman for being an imbecile (like I am for bothering writing in response to a “20/20 hindsight visionary”). Lastly, the Weaver trade was “universally” lauded at the time, the Yankees acquiring “ace material”. I will say I didn’t care for the trade myself, Lilly was a promising left-hander, who went on to have a very fine career. But I find it a stretch to use that as anti-Cashman ammunition. Why are you bothering going on with this? It’s Cashman, “The Swordsman” that you’re attacking. And I find that a rebuttal that I made on this thread last week was, “interestingly, deleted”. The fusillade of “what ifs”, the type that you find eager to use, more than the sails of you “ship of ideas” could take,shredded and deflated. I enjoy the “sting of battle” as much as you do. Let’s call this a “gentlemen’s draw”, shall we?

    18. Mr. October
      March 21st, 2014 | 6:40 pm

      KPOcala wrote:

      And you seriously believe, that in 1998, Cashman really had that kind of pull?

      @ KPOcala:
      K.P. of Ocala, FL:

      Cashman had “enough pull” to claim credit for the general management of the 1998 team, as he has done in multiple interviews since… He is given “credit” for the general management of FOUR (4) World Championship teams on outlets such as ESPN.

      So if Brian Cashman didn’t have “enough pull” to acquire a pitcher George Steinbrenner was interested in by reaching an agreement on a trade of Johnson for Irabu, Lowell, and a third prospect and getting permission from the commissioner’s office to talk to Johnson about a trade extension in July of 1998, or to sign Johnson as a free agent, then why is he given him credit for world championships won by teams built by Michael?

      From 1999-2013, Team Cashman had the highest payroll in MLB, so the money was there to sign Johnson in 1998. If Cashman didn’t have the “pull” to add “one of this generation’s best pitchers” to teams built by Michael, then he doesn’t deserve the recognition of a GM that has won four world championships…

      Gene Michael had a deal in place for Johnson in 1993, when Johnson was available. Johnson was available in 1998, and The Yankee Swordsman was not interested in his acquisition through trade or free agency. Johnson went on to win four consecutive Cy Young Awards in the years immediately afterward on his way to a Hall of Fame Career, and a World Series MVP against Team Cashman in 2001.

      Cashman expressed little-to-no interest in Johnson until he saw an opportunity to trade one of the finest prospects this organization has ever developed (Cano) for Johnson when Johnson was 41 and at the end of his career.

      These are facts. Facts.

      KPOcala wrote:

      Sheffield’s career melted into “irrelevancy”.

      Once again, you two do not have all of the facts…

      Sheffield’s career did not “melt into ‘irrelevancy’.” Gary Sheffield was on his way to an MVP-caliber season in the first year of his contract with the Tigers (extended to three years) when he suffered a labrum tear to his right should in an outfield collision in Jul., 2007. He was never the same player after that.

      And it is of little relevance that a trade was lauded by any party “at the time;” what matters is results. It is of little relevance that one other team was interested in Kei Igawa, or Carl Pavano “at the time;” what matters is results.

      The results for The Cashman Autoeroticism Era are one (1) AL Pennant since 2005; a .490 postseason WPCT in only 11 postseason series played.

    19. Evan3457
      March 21st, 2014 | 8:01 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      Cashman expressed little-to-no interest in Johnson until he saw an opportunity to trade one of the finest prospects this organization has ever developed (Cano) for Johnson when Johnson was 41 and at the end of his career.
      These are facts. Facts.

      No, actually, they’re not.
      The drive to trade for Johnson following the collapse in the 2004 ALCS came from George…just as George wanted to trade for him 1998.

      Cashman planned to use the money that eventually was spent on Johnson in signing Carlos Beltran. George didn’t allow it.
      KPOcala wrote:
      Sheffield’s career melted into “irrelevancy”.
      Once again, you two do not have all of the facts…
      Sheffield’s career did not “melt into ‘irrelevancy’.” Gary Sheffield was on his way to an MVP-caliber season in the first year of his contract with the Tigers

      The facts are that Sheffield was not even the most valuable player on the Tigers at the time of his injury in late July; Ordonez was outhitting him, Granderson hitting nearly as well, and both were more valuable defenders (primarily because they were playing a position, and not DHing).

      The results for The Cashman Autoeroticism Era are one (1) AL Pennant since 2005; a .490 postseason WPCT in only 11 postseason series played.

      …and one title.

    20. Evan3457
      March 21st, 2014 | 8:16 pm

      The last rumor involving the Yankees and Randy Johnson in 1998 occurred on the day he got traded to the Astros, and it was:

      The Madison Square Garden sports wire accidentally goes on line to say that the Mariners deal Johnson for Hideki Irabu, Ramiro Mendoza and Homer Bush. They retract the story immediately.

      As of July 31st, Hideki Irabu was 10-4 with a 3.23 ERA, by the way.

    21. Mr. October
      March 21st, 2014 | 8:19 pm

      KPOcala wrote:

      Steve Phillips is an ultimate slime…

      Speaking of Phillips, I have a theory: Cashman wanted Louise to call him “Steve” when the two of them were out in public so that people who might have recognized him might have also confused him with Phillips…

      Why pick the name “Steve?” It probably wasn’t because Cashman was a big fan of waswatching.com…

      You know who was in the bar tonight with some blond? That ultimate slime who used to be the GM of one the New York teams – Steve ‘something’….” Wile E. Cashman…

      KPOcala wrote:

      Why are you bothering going on with this?

      @ KPOcala:
      LOL… I’m just replying to you…

    22. Mr. October
      March 21st, 2014 | 8:40 pm

      @ KPOcala:
      FYI:

      Tigers’ Gary Sheffield day to day with shoulder injury

      “DETROIT (AP) … A day after [the Detroit designated hitter] had X-rays and an MRI exam, [Sheffield] said the injury stemmed from when he fell on his right elbow in a collision…

      Sheffield was 0-for-3 at Oakland and hit .152 (5-for-33) on Detroit’s eight-game trip. He is hitting .290, with 23 homers and 67 RBIs…’I can’t be myself,’ Sheffield said. ‘Guys throwing 88 miles per hour, and I can’t do nothing with it…'”

      http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/sports/baseball/2007-08-03-1540955029_x.htm

      Do the math: What were Gary Sheffield’s “MVP-caliber” numbers before his career-ending injury at the midpoint of the ’07 season?

      caliber |ˈkaləbər| ( Brit. calibre) (abbr.: cal or cal.)
      noun
      1 the quality of someone’s character or the level of someone’s ability : they could ill afford to lose a man of his caliber.
      • the standard reached by something : educational facilities of a very high caliber.

      DERIVATIVES
      calibered adjective [also in combination ] .

      oxymoron |ˌäksəˈmôrˌän|
      noun
      a figure of speech in which apparently contradictory terms appear in conjunction (e.g. Curtis Granderson’s prime, Brian Cashman’s judgment).
      DERIVATIVES
      oxymoronic |-məˈränik| adjective

    23. Evan3457
      March 21st, 2014 | 9:52 pm

      Sheffield was having a very good season.
      He wasn’t going to win the MVP.
      He wasn’t going to be top 5 in the MVP voting, probably not top ten.
      He was a DH, and not even the best DH in the league; David Ortiz was. Ortiz made the All-Star team, Sheffield didn’t; there were 8 outfielders on that team, and Sheffield wasn’t one of them, and the All-Star game was on July 10th, before his injury.
      He wasn’t the MVP on his own team, Ordonez was. Sheffield’s peak OPS for the season was .986 on July 15. Ordonez OPS for the season was above .986 every day of the season from April 29th through the end of the year.

      His injury was unfortunate, but he was 38 years old, and he was seriously injured the year before. (By the way, how come when the Yankees’ old players get hurt, Cashman’s an idiot, but when Sheffield gets seriously hurt at age 37 and 38, that’s just bad luck?)

      Oh, and there’s nothing oxymoronic about “Granderson’s prime”. He did have a prime, and it was pretty damn good. As has been shown before.