• Cashman Excuse Machine In Mid-Season Form Already

    Posted by on April 12th, 2014 · Comments (54)

    Via Bryan Hoch

    With first baseman Mark Teixeira and closer David Robertson on the 15-day disabled list, manager Joe Girardi has been using Kelly Johnson as the regular first baseman while leaning mostly upon Shawn Kelley to close out games in the ninth inning.

    Cashman said that after the Yankees spent hundreds of millions on free-agent imports like Masahiro Tanaka, Brian McCann, Jacoby Ellsbury and Carlos Beltran, there was just not enough budgetary room to prepare for every possible scenario.

    “I think we were very open about our intentions,” Cashman said. “We wanted to fix as much as we could, but acknowledged that we couldn’t fix everything that needed to be addressed. That’s with the money we were in position to spend as well as the available talent. The better talent was really heavily in favor of the outfield rather than the infield.

    “I don’t have any regrets. We pulled down the players that we targeted and we were open with the infield and the bullpen would be unanswered questions that everyone would need to stay tuned with as a developing story. It’s the same verbiage I used in the winter time.”

    …we couldn’t fix everything that needed to be addressed…

    And, who hasn’t done their job correctly for years now, bringing cause for things needed to be fixed? ¡Ay, caramba!

    Comments on Cashman Excuse Machine In Mid-Season Form Already

    1. Mr. October
      April 16th, 2014 | 2:25 pm

      KPOcala wrote:

      Imagine if Cashman had this “damning indictment of incompetence”? This site would be “overwhelmed” and NYC, would cease to exists, as would America itself……

      LOL… Let’s see this idiot (http://deadspin.com/5845140/the-photos-of-yankees-gm-brian-cashman-that-broke-up-a-marriage) develop a Moore, Cobb, and Hellickson (or win the same amount of games, and same amount of AL Pennants, in six years with an average payroll of $60 million, as Friedman has from 2008-13) before we damn him with an indictment of incompetence of not having the depth in their system to replace a Moore, Cobb, or Hellickson…

    2. Mr. October
      April 16th, 2014 | 4:09 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      … in the end, does it really matter that of the lineup of the 1977-8 Champion Yankees, only Munson and White were homegrown… neither Tidrow nor Lyle was a product of the farm system…

      “March 22, 1972: Sparky Lyle from Red Sox for Danny Cater and Mario Guerrero

      Lyle was Boston’s relief ace from his sophomore campaign in 1968 until he was traded to the Yankees during spring training in 1972. In four straight years with the BoSox, he finished in the top seven in the AL in saves.

      … the Yankees stole Lyle. He pitched seven seasons in the Bronx, going 57-40 with a 2.41 ERA while compiling 141 saves. He was a three-time All-Star and led the AL in saves twice. In his first season with the Yankees, he had a minuscule 1.92 ERA and finished third in the MVP voting, which no doubt made Bostonians wince… Lyle also won the AL Cy Young Award in 1977, the first AL reliever to do so.”

      Mario Guerrero: “homegrown.”

      “Nov. 27, 1972: Graig Nettles and Gerry Moses from Indians for John Ellis, Charlie Spikes, Rusty Torres and Jerry Kenny

      In 11 seasons in the Bronx, Nettles was a six-time All-Star, won Gold Gloves in 1977 and 1978, and was a key to the Yankees’ World Series titles in 1977 and 1978. During that time, he hit 240 home runs, leading the AL in 1976 with 32. He’d go on to set an AL record for third basemen by hitting 319 home runs.

      You could argue that the Yankees wouldn’t have won it all in 1977 without Nettles. He hit .255 with 37 home runs and 107 RBI, finishing the season with a .496 slugging percentage. Those slugging numbers were all career highs.

      In return the Yankees didn’t give up much. Kenny played in just a handful of games for the Indians. Torres battled to hit over the Mendoza line – and lost. Ellis played three decent seasons in Cleveland before he was dealt to the Rangers. Spikes hit 45 homers and drove in 153 runs in his first two seasons with Cleveland, but his career headed way, way south after that.

      John Ellis: “homegrown.”

      “Dec. 11, 1975: Willie Randolph, Ken Brett and Dock Ellis from Pirates for Doc Medich

      In Medich, the Yankees didn’t give up much; he went 49-40 in his three full seasons in the Bronx, and was an average pitcher. After leaving the Yankees, he went on to have an average career with several teams.

      For mediocrity, the Yankees got Randolph, who became their regular second baseman for 13 seasons and was a five-time All-Star. Randolph could get on base (he led the league in walks in 1980 and was usually in the top 10), steal (he stole 30+ each season between 1978-1980), and he always had a solid, if unspectacular, batting average.

      They also got Dock Ellis, who gave them one terrific season in 1976, going 17-8 with a 3.19 ERA before the Yankees dealt him to Texas in 1977.”

      Doc Medich: “homegrown.”

      “April 27, 1974: Yankees receive first baseman Chris Chambliss and right-handers Dick Tidrow and Cecil Upshaw from Indians for left-hander Fritz Peterson and right-handers Steve Kline, Fred Beene and Tom Buskey.

      Chambliss hit one of the most dramatic home runs in Yankees history, his pennant-winning drive off the Royals’ Mark Littell in Game 5 of the 1976 AL Championship Series and was a solid presence at first base for the Bombers from 1974-79. In seven seasons with New York, Chambliss hit .282 with 79 homers, winning two World Series titles and driving in at least 90 runs from 1976-78.

      Tidrow was useful for the Yanks, going 41-33 with a 3.61 ERA in 211 games from 1974-79 as a setup reliever and starter… The deal… turned out to be a steal for the Yankees. None of the four pitchers dealt to the Indians wound up lasting more than four seasons there.”

      Fritz Peterson: “homegrown.”

    3. Evan3457
      April 16th, 2014 | 6:36 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      … in the end, does it really matter that of the lineup of the 1977-8 Champion Yankees, only Munson and White were homegrown… neither Tidrow nor Lyle was a product of the farm system…
      “March 22, 1972: Sparky Lyle from Red Sox for Danny Cater and Mario Guerrero
      Lyle was Boston’s relief ace from his sophomore campaign in 1968 until he was traded to the Yankees during spring training in 1972. In four straight years with the BoSox, he finished in the top seven in the AL in saves.
      … the Yankees stole Lyle. He pitched seven seasons in the Bronx, going 57-40 with a 2.41 ERA while compiling 141 saves. He was a three-time All-Star and led the AL in saves twice. In his first season with the Yankees, he had a minuscule 1.92 ERA and finished third in the MVP voting, which no doubt made Bostonians wince… Lyle also won the AL Cy Young Award in 1977, the first AL reliever to do so.”
      Mario Guerrero: “homegrown.”
      “Nov. 27, 1972: Graig Nettles and Gerry Moses from Indians for John Ellis, Charlie Spikes, Rusty Torres and Jerry Kenny
      In 11 seasons in the Bronx, Nettles was a six-time All-Star, won Gold Gloves in 1977 and 1978, and was a key to the Yankees’ World Series titles in 1977 and 1978. During that time, he hit 240 home runs, leading the AL in 1976 with 32. He’d go on to set an AL record for third basemen by hitting 319 home runs.
      You could argue that the Yankees wouldn’t have won it all in 1977 without Nettles. He hit .255 with 37 home runs and 107 RBI, finishing the season with a .496 slugging percentage. Those slugging numbers were all career highs.
      In return the Yankees didn’t give up much. Kenny played in just a handful of games for the Indians. Torres battled to hit over the Mendoza line – and lost. Ellis played three decent seasons in Cleveland before he was dealt to the Rangers. Spikes hit 45 homers and drove in 153 runs in his first two seasons with Cleveland, but his career headed way, way south after that.
      John Ellis: “homegrown.”

      ==============================================
      And these 3 trades were made in the pre-George era, and therefore, pre-Gabe Paul
      ===========================================================

      “Dec. 11, 1975: Willie Randolph, Ken Brett and Dock Ellis from Pirates for Doc Medich
      In Medich, the Yankees didn’t give up much; he went 49-40 in his three full seasons in the Bronx, and was an average pitcher. After leaving the Yankees, he went on to have an average career with several teams.
      For mediocrity, the Yankees got Randolph, who became their regular second baseman for 13 seasons and was a five-time All-Star. Randolph could get on base (he led the league in walks in 1980 and was usually in the top 10), steal (he stole 30+ each season between 1978-1980), and he always had a solid, if unspectacular, batting average.
      They also got Dock Ellis, who gave them one terrific season in 1976, going 17-8 with a 3.19 ERA before the Yankees dealt him to Texas in 1977.”
      Doc Medich: “homegrown.”
      “April 27, 1974: Yankees receive first baseman Chris Chambliss and right-handers Dick Tidrow and Cecil Upshaw from Indians for left-hander Fritz Peterson and right-handers Steve Kline, Fred Beene and Tom Buskey.
      Chambliss hit one of the most dramatic home runs in Yankees history, his pennant-winning drive off the Royals’ Mark Littell in Game 5 of the 1976 AL Championship Series and was a solid presence at first base for the Bombers from 1974-79. In seven seasons with New York, Chambliss hit .282 with 79 homers, winning two World Series titles and driving in at least 90 runs from 1976-78.
      Tidrow was useful for the Yanks, going 41-33 with a 3.61 ERA in 211 games from 1974-79 as a setup reliever and starter… The deal… turned out to be a steal for the Yankees. None of the four pitchers dealt to the Indians wound up lasting more than four seasons there.”
      Fritz Peterson: “homegrown.”

      =============================================
      And all of this is besides the point. As usual.

    4. Mr. October
      April 16th, 2014 | 8:58 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      … in the end, does it really matter that of the lineup of the 1977-8 Champion Yankees, only Munson and White were homegrown… neither Tidrow nor Lyle was a product of the farm system…

      Continued…

      “April 5, 1977: Yankees receive shortstop Bucky Dent from the White Sox for outfielder Oscar Gamble, and right-handers LaMarr Hoyt and Bob Polinsky… Dent finished second in AL Rookie of the Year voting in 1974 and was an All-Star in 1975 with the White Sox… Dent shined in the postseason, batting .417 (10-24) with seven RBI in the World Series to earn MVP honors. He was later named to two All-Star teams with the Yankees in 1980 and 1981. Hoyt became one of the top pitchers in baseball, leading the AL with 19 wins in 1982. The following season, he led the league with 24 wins and won the AL Cy Young Award… He retired at the age of 31 with a career record of 98-68… Polinsky remained in the minors and never pitched in the major leagues.”

      LaMarr Hoyt and Bob Polinsky: “homegrown.”

      “October 22, 1974: Yankees receive outfielder Bobby Bonds for outfielder Bobby Murcer… December 11, 1975: Yankees receive outfielder Mickey Rivers and right-hander Ed Figueroa for Bobby Bonds… Rivers was a leadoff hitter in his four years in New York, batting .297 and averaging 23 doubles per season. He also hit .398 (22-for-57) in three ALCS meetings against Kansas City. Rivers was an All-Star in 1976 and finished third in the AL MVP voting…

      Even though Ed Figueroa was 0-4 in seven postseason starts, his pitching in the regular season helped get the Yankees to October baseball. In 1976, he led New York with 19 wins. Two years later, he was 7-7 in mid-July but went 13-2 to finish the season at 20-9… Figueroa was 62-39 in his five Yankee seasons…”

      Bobby Murcer: “homegrown.”

      1977 World Series Game 1 lineup:

      Rivers
      Randolph
      Munson
      Jackson
      Chambliss
      Nettles
      Piniella
      Dent
      Gullet

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Doesn’t matter to me one way or the other. Two of my favorite players of all time are Paul O’Neill…

      Nov. 3, 1992: Paul O’Neill and Joe DeBarry traded from Cincinnati to New York for Roberto Kelly… This trade not only helped provide a winning season, but four more World Series titles as well. O’Neill was a productive player in Cincinnati, but he never hit over .300 and never had a 100 RBI season. In his first season in pinstripes, he hit .311, the first of six consecutive .300 seasons. He also won the batting title with a .359 average in the strike-shortened 1994 season. O’Neill had four straight 100-plus RBI seasons from 1997-2000. In his nine Yankee seasons, he batted .305 and averaged 21 home runs and 95 RBI. He was also named to four All-Star teams… Roberto Kelly was the lone Yankees All-Star representative in 1992. He was also an All-Star in Cincinnati in 1993, when he batted .319 with nine home runs and 35 RBI. Kelly was traded the following season to Atlanta and played for five more teams before returning to the Yankees as a free agent for the 2000 season…”

      Roberto Kelly: “homegrown.”

      @ Raf:
      Who needs a farm system? Baseball’s nothing but a crapshoot anyway…

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.