• Yankees Fans Welcome Cano Home

    Posted by on April 30th, 2014 · Comments (22)

    Via Joel Sherman -

    There have been many times in the five-plus-year history of this version of Yankee Stadium when the stands have been full, the games have been important and the noise and enthusiasm have been lacking.
    Many reasons have been cited for how the Stadium got unplugged. Poor acoustics. Rich folks unlikely to deliver much noise being the only ones who could afford seats close to the field. Too many indoor hiding places.

    But finally something was unearthed that could stir a full-volume response from a even a quarter-filled stadium — that terrible, evil devil Robinson Cano.

    You know he had committed the unpardonable sin of being the Yankees’ best player (by far) for about the past half decade, never was involved in off-field trouble and was well-regarded by his teammates. That horrible, horrible man. I really can’t separate who is the bigger public nuisance, Cano or Donald Sterling.

    On a rainy, raw Tuesday night, the reception for Cano was chillier than the weather. He was booed incessantly, relentlessly and virulently from his pregame announcement through each at-bat. The Bleacher Creatures must have forgotten no team in major league history has spent more to import players from elsewhere as the Yankees have when they chanted “YOU SOLD OUT” at Cano.

    The 10,000 or so folks who endured the bad weather sounded like four or five times that much with their animus drowning out the few who were trying to offer applause and thanks for the memories. It was as loud as the Stadium has been all year, louder than some playoff games of the recent past.

    A few notes here:

    1. This is a unique situation for Yankees fans. When was the last time that a “star” player in his “prime” left the Yankees to go sign with another team? Even further, when was the last time it was an everyday position player? Simple truth, here, is that Yankees fans are not used to having someone walk away on them. So, how are they supposed to know how to act in these situations?

    2. The Yankees threw some gasoline on this one. No one was there at the game. And, they threw the field mics up to full throttle. When the M’s manager came out to argue with the third base ump late in the game, you could hear every word out of their mouth – until someone starting cursing and then YES lowered the volume on the feed. If YES had their field mic on normal levels, you wouldn’t have heard the Cano reaction in quite the same way.

    3. Related to the above, the Stadium was empty last night. The only ones willing to sit out in the cold – and the rain – were probably consuming some adult beverages to offset their better judgement. To say that’s representative of Yankees fan, and how they feel about Cano, is ignoring the rules around sample size.

    I think the “Welcome Home Robbie” reaction would have been a little different if the M’s first game in New York this year had been on Old-Timers Day or Bat Day. And, what happened last night was sort of the perfect storm, and things just lining up, for him to get the Bronx Cheer…and for it to be heard, thanks to YES.

    Comments on Yankees Fans Welcome Cano Home

    1. YankCrank
      April 30th, 2014 | 10:58 am

      I was in the bleachers last night, probably where the majority of the chanting was coming from, and it was embarrassing. I stood up and cheered Cano for every at bat and was predictably yelled at for doing so. Thankfully I didn’t receive a beer shower, so at least there’s that.

      To me, it’s quite simple: Cano was the best player on this team for the last four years, was always on the field and helped us win a World Series. You take a moment to appreciate that when you have the chance, and if he decides to take a big deal to go play out West, good for him. There isn’t one person here who would turn down $240 to go play in a state with no income tax.

    2. Raf
      April 30th, 2014 | 11:16 am

      Yeah, given how active the Yankees have been on the FA market since Steinbrenner bought the team, Yankees fans really shouldn’t be griping.

      Personally, I think the income tax angle is overblown. Has any player ever mentioned that they signed a contract based on tax implications?

    3. April 30th, 2014 | 11:47 am

      @ Raf:
      Well, $240 million in a tax free state is more than $240 in a state that taxes…so, does the play have to say anything? It’s sort of a given that it’s a better deal.

    4. April 30th, 2014 | 11:48 am

      @ YankCrank:
      From your angle, at the start of the game, when Cano came up in the first, how many people would you say were in the stands? Maybe 10,000? On TV, the place looked EMPTY.

    5. Raf
      April 30th, 2014 | 12:23 pm

      @ Steve L.:
      Mike Hampton mentioned the quality of the schools when he signed with the Rockies. Manny mentioned he was tired of seeing the Yankees win. Players usually mention why they signed with a particular ballclub. Respect, chance to win, wanting to be closer to home have all been given as reasons a player wants to play for a team.

      I don’t see free agents flocking to WA, TX and FL to take advantage of the savings. As expensive as NY is, there have been no shortage of free agents that have signed there.

    6. redbug
      April 30th, 2014 | 12:43 pm

      @ YankCrank:

      The YES guys said they did a roll call for him; that he acknowledged them; then then did the sell out thing.

      True?

      Even worse if true.

    7. April 30th, 2014 | 12:51 pm

      Yes. The bleacher creatures chanted “Robinson,” got him to turn around and acknowledge them, and then chanted “you sold out.” Hypocritical and embarrassing. And the mikes were turned up, as Steve notes, to capture it.

    8. #15
      April 30th, 2014 | 2:50 pm

      @ Raf:
      It’s about the money, and yes, with ~ 13% NYS/NYC income tax vs. 0 in several states like Florida, Texas, and Washington… It’s a very, very big deal, I don’t care how much you make. The players never talk about it because they want to wrap themselves in altruism… “It’s where I always wanted to play….Blah, blah, blah…” I’m sure they structure things as best they can, but if you just take the ~ 13% value in Cano’s case and play out the numbers, that’s in the ballpark of 30 million in taxes over the life of the deal. Probably more than all of us in this conversation will likely accumulate in our entire lifetimes, collectively! Keep that in mind next time some team/fan gripes about how much the Yankees offered their free agent player to come to NY. We effectively have to gross-up our offers to achieve net parity. And that’s not even factoring in other cost of living variables.

    9. Mr. October
      April 30th, 2014 | 3:33 pm

      Raf wrote:

      I don’t see free agents flocking to WA, TX and FL to take advantage of the savings…

      “… The Rangers beat out the New York Yankees for [Shin-Soo] Choo, by leveraging the value of the lack of state income tax in Texas. The approximate $130 million in Texas is worth about $143-145 million in New York. The Yankees reportedly offered a seven-year deal worth $140 million recently…”

      “… A big reason Choo agreed to go to the Rangers instead of taking more money from the Yankees is the lack of a state income tax in Texas, according to Ken Rosenthal of Fox Sports. [Team Cashman] reportedly would’ve had to offer a contract totaling around $147 million just to match Texas’ offer at a post-tax level…”

      https://twitter.com/Ken_Rosenthal/status/414454034087825408

      Any booing would have been more appropriately directed at the front office…

    10. YankCrank
      April 30th, 2014 | 3:51 pm

      @ Steve L.:

      10,000 tops. There was nobody there, it was a ghost town.

    11. YankCrank
      April 30th, 2014 | 3:52 pm

      redbug wrote:

      @ YankCrank:
      The YES guys said they did a roll call for him; that he acknowledged them; then then did the sell out thing.
      True?
      Even worse if true.

      Completely true. I love the Yankees but often find myself disgusted to be associated with Yankee fans.

    12. Mr. October
      April 30th, 2014 | 5:19 pm

      Hopefully Carsten Charles turns into Tommy John soon – he’s 17-16 with a 4.83 E.R.A. since March, 2013. In highlights of last night’s game, he also looks as if he’s put a few pounds back on too…

    13. redbug
      April 30th, 2014 | 5:36 pm

      @ lisaswan: Yes. The bleacher creatures chanted “Robinson,” got him to turn around and acknowledge them, and then chanted “you sold out.” Hypocritical and embarrassing. And the mikes were turned up, as Steve notes, to capture it.

      The fans, Yankees and YES are classless. Michael Kay loved rubbing it in on behalf of his bosses.

      Who wouldn’t take all that money (and not pay NY taxes)?

      Nights like last night make it less pleasurable to be a Yankee fan.

    14. April 30th, 2014 | 7:06 pm

      YankCrank wrote:

      @ Steve L.:
      10,000 tops. There was nobody there, it was a ghost town.

      Thanks. That’s part of the problem. People are taking the actions of 10K and making it out like it’s all Yankees fans. I swear, make it a sunny, weekend, day game with a Beanie Baby giveaway and you will see a totally different reaction to Cano’s first PA back.

    15. Raf
      May 3rd, 2014 | 10:58 am

      #15 wrote:

      @ Raf:
      It’s about the money…

      Of course it is, and the M’s offered far and above what the Yanks or anyone else offered. The no income tax was an added bonus, not the primary driver.

      Now, to be fair, it was projected that Cano would get a deal similar to what he received;
      http://www.mlbtraderumors.com/2013/11/free-agent-profile-robinson-cano.html
      “Expected Contract

      There’s little doubt that Cano will sign the richest contract of the offseason, and it seems likely that his representation will set out seeking 10 years. If Cano’s price tag were to drop to seven years, I imagine that numerous suitors would emerge. More realistically, the middle ground between teams’ comfort levels and Van Wagenen/Jay-Z’s demands will probably be met in the form of eight or nine years.

      Cano finds himself in a similar situation to that of Prince Fielder heading into the 2012 season — everyone expects a historic contract, but there appears to be a lack of logical suitors. Ultimately, the market came to Fielder and Scott Boras, and Fielder was able to land a nine-year, $214MM contract.

      I expect Fielder’s contract to be the floor for the Cano camp. Cano figures to shatter the records for longest contract, largest guarantee and largest average annual value for a second baseman. How much will he sign for though? Dating back to 2007, the mean AAV for hitter contracts of at least eight years is $24.44MM. That grouping includes a select quartet of then-elite bats: Alex Rodriguez, Albert Pujols, Fielder and Mark Teixeira.

      That mean AAV would come out to an even $220MM over the course of a nine-year contract or $244.4MM over the course of 10 years. It makes sense to try to top that AAV, and I believe they’ll do just that, though not over the course of a 10-year deal. However, a nine-year, $234MM contract would give Cano’s camp a nice round number ($26MM annually) and blow Fielder’s contract out of the water. It would also top the mean AAV for baseball’s most recent mega-deals and establish the second-highest AAV of any such deal as well. As such, that’s my prediction for Cano’s eventual contract, even if the market has yet to seriously take shape.”

    16. Raf
      May 3rd, 2014 | 11:10 am

      Mr. October wrote:

      Raf wrote:
      I don’t see free agents flocking to WA, TX and FL to take advantage of the savings…
      “… The Rangers beat out the New York Yankees for [Shin-Soo] Choo, by leveraging the value of the lack of state income tax in Texas. The approximate $130 million in Texas is worth about $143-145 million in New York. The Yankees reportedly offered a seven-year deal worth $140 million recently…”
      “… A big reason Choo agreed to go to the Rangers instead of taking more money from the Yankees is the lack of a state income tax in Texas, according to Ken Rosenthal of Fox Sports. [Team Cashman] reportedly would’ve had to offer a contract totaling around $147 million just to match Texas’ offer at a post-tax level…”
      https://twitter.com/Ken_Rosenthal/status/414454034087825408
      Any booing would have been more appropriately directed at the front office…

      Thanks for the find.

      Still, Cliff Lee left Texas for Philadelphia, Mike Napoli left Texas for Boston, CJ Wilson and Josh Hamilton left Texas for California.

      http://www.ussmariner.com/2013/12/03/my-thoughts-on-robinson-cano-and-the-mariners/

      “Two years ago, it was Prince Fielder. The M’s waited around for Fielder’s price to come down, keeping their options open in case Scott Boras decided to engage them on a deal for a contract south of $200 million.” – Prince Fielder wound up signing with the Tigers

      “Last year, it was first Josh Hamilton, then Justin Upton. They went after Hamilton first, using the winter meetings as a chance to make a run at the best power hitter on the free agent market.” – Josh Hamilton signed with the Angels, Justin Upton blocked a trade to Seattle.

      I still don’t see free agents flocking to WA, TX and FL to take advantage of the savings.

    17. Raf
      May 3rd, 2014 | 11:21 am

      http://www.ussmariner.com/2013/12/03/my-thoughts-on-robinson-cano-and-the-mariners/

      “The Yankees reported first offer was for $160 million over seven years, with reports suggesting they’d push up to $175 million, which would put them at $25 million per season. For the Mariners to convince Cano to leave New York, they’re not going to get him for $180 million or $190 million. He’s not going from New York to Seattle for an extra $2 or $3 million per year. If they’re going to get Cano to really consider leaving New York, they’re going to have to guarantee those last few years where New York is saying no. They’re going to have to go to eight or nine or maybe even 10 years. They’re going to have to come in well north of $200 million, maybe even pushing towards $250 million.

      If it really were about the lack of state income tax, the M’s would not have exceeded the Yankees offer by as much as they did.

    18. Mr. October
      May 3rd, 2014 | 11:22 am

      Raf wrote:

      … not the primary driver.

      Agreed. Approximately $100 million (or more according to some published reports or estimates) in personal income tax savings over the course of ten years was not the primary driver in Cano’s decision to play for the Seattle Mariners and not the New York Yankees – the primary drivers for Cano were Pike Place Market and The Seattle Art Museum.

    19. Mr. October
      May 3rd, 2014 | 11:30 am

      Raf wrote:

      Thanks for the find.

      You’re welcome.

      Raf wrote:

      I still don’t see free agents flocking to WA, TX and FL to take advantage of the savings.

      Agreed. One would certainly think more free agents would have flocked to teams with the payrolls of the Houston Astros, Florida Marlins, Tampa Bays Rays, etc. to take of advantage of the savings that come with playing in jurisdtictions with no personal income tax…

    20. Mr. October
      May 3rd, 2014 | 11:34 am

      Raf wrote:

      If it really were about the lack of state income tax…

      And A.J. Burnett could not have been more comfortable pitching for The New York Yankees in The Bronx…

    21. Raf
      May 3rd, 2014 | 11:47 am

      Mr. October wrote:

      And A.J. Burnett…

      Left Florida for Toronto. What was the personal income tax savings from that move?

    22. Mr. October
      May 4th, 2014 | 3:06 pm

      Raf wrote:

      Still, Cliff Lee left Texas for Philadelphia…

      Going inside the Cliff Lee negotiations

      “‘… [The Rangers] were aggressive in their interest of [Lee] They stressed that they weren’t going to be able to spend the most money, but that the value might be just as good based on the fact that there was no state income tax…’

      [Lee's agent] called in his accountants to analyze the offers [of the Phillies and Rangers]… They explored the possibility of Lee taking up residency in Texas to take advantage of the tax break… but Lee wanted to keep his home in Little Rock and wasn’t going to move his kids out of school.

      Lee didn’t say he’d go to Texas for sure if the club guaranteed [a seventh] year… The Rangers weren’t willing to do that… Despite a huge offer from [Team Cashman]… in addition to the Rangers’ offer, the Lees decided on Philadelphia…”

      http://sports.espn.go.com/dallas/mlb/columns/story?id=6570095

      “Next.”

      Raf wrote:

      CJ Wilson… left Texas for California.

      Free agent C.J. Wilson, Angels reach 5-year deal

      “… [Wilson's agent] said the Rangers were polite and cordial… but never made a serious offer to keep their ace…”

      http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/sports/baseball/al/angels/story/2011-12-08/cj-wilson-signs-with-angels/51750078/1

      “Next.”

      Raf wrote:

      [A.J.] Burnett] Left Florida for Toronto. What was the personal income tax savings from that move?

      “A.J. Burnett enjoyed almost six years with the Florida Marlins before the franchise asked Burnett to leave the team…”

      http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1094101-aj-burnett-top-6-lowlights-of-his-career/page/6

      @ Raf:
      I think Brian Cashman’s 5-year $82.5 million free agent head case signing in 2008-09 wore out his welcome with the Florida Marlins…

      “Next.”

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