• Mets Beat Yankees…Again

    Posted by on May 14th, 2014 · Comments (14)

    Via the Daily News -

    The Yanks and Mets often seem to operate not in separate leagues, but unrelated universes. One payroll in excess of $200 million, another failing to crack $90 million. Established, celebrity ballplayers in the Bronx, random lineups and Kyle Farnsworth in Queens.

    But while the Mets have spent too many years chopping payroll and selling fans on prospects who might or might not succeed (nothing to see here, folks, but look! We have a phenom in Triple-A!), this Subway Series has presented them with the chance to contrast what they are trying to build with a team that might be wilting into an aging, expensive disaster.

    It takes less than one minute to walk from the home clubhouse to the visiting one on the lower level of Yankee Stadium, but the difference in mood was jarring, during the first half of this year’s series.

    On the first base side on Tuesday afternoon, you had Carlos Beltran, 37, standing at his locker, explaining that he would need significant surgery to remove a bone spur from his elbow, if a cortisone shot would not work. This news was bleak; if Beltran avoids the surgery, but still feels pain, his production could suffer greatly.

    “That would be a tough injury,” another player explained. “If you can’t get full extension, and you’re swinging a little bit down here instead of up there, that could be the difference between a foul ball and a home run.”

    You also had Ichiro Suzuki, 40, holding his own mini-news conference a few feet away, explaining that his sore back would probably prevent him from playing. And a few minutes after that, you had Girardi announcing that an important reliever, Shawn Kelley, was on the disabled list with his own back injury. Oh, and CC Sabathia was visiting the dreaded Dr. Andrews for a follow-up knee exam.

    After the game, you had Kelley providing a perfect summary of his team’s crisis: “It’s almost like injuries are contagious right now.”

    “When you become older, your body doesn’t necessarily bounce back as quick and heal as quick,” Girardi said, clearly knowing that his team had arrived at a tough moment, clearly unable to explain exactly what a manager might do about it.

    It’s really hard to say that the Yankees first quarter of the 2014 season has been a success. Worse, it doesn’t seem that it will be getting better any time soon.

    At this rate, 2013-2014 could be the Yankees worst back-to-back full seasons since 1991-1992. And, if you use pyth W-L%, then these two years are just as bad as 1991-92. Yet, no one in the organization will be held accountable – as always, in life after George.

    Comments on Mets Beat Yankees…Again

    1. Scout
      May 14th, 2014 | 8:17 am

      “Yet, no one in the organization will be held accountable – as always, in life after George.”

      Not so. I am sure, after all the injuries, someone on the training staff will be let go. And after the season Hal will order a thorough organizational review of training procedures. :-)

    2. May 14th, 2014 | 10:38 am

      How many years in a row like this we will need before someone does pull the Cashman plug?

    3. Scout
      May 14th, 2014 | 11:08 am

      More likely he would be kicked upstairs. I say two more years, at the end of 2015, to round out a tidy ten years since he was given complete control of the farm system.

    4. May 14th, 2014 | 11:10 am

      I have no problem if they want to kick him upstairs. Probably a better role for him…

    5. Mr. October
      May 14th, 2014 | 1:07 pm

      Mike Francesa to Sweeny Murti on the radio yesterday afternoon: “… if the Yankees lost 5 straight games to the Mets when George Steinbrenner was alive, people in this organization would’ve been walking around on eggshells.” And now it’s 6 straight.

    6. NC Yankee
      May 14th, 2014 | 4:49 pm

      Everybody wants to make Big Stein into a hero now. Not too long ago Yankee fans hated him and his micro management.

    7. May 15th, 2014 | 6:54 am

      NC Yankee wrote:

      Everybody wants to make Big Stein into a hero now. Not too long ago Yankee fans hated him and his micro management.

      He got better. Yes, in the early days, he was a meddler. But, before he had the stroke, or whatever it was, he was doing great with Torre. Still, the employees feared him because he demanded excellence. That no longer exists with the Yankees. Now, it’s all about the P&L and not the W&L.

    8. Greg H.
      May 15th, 2014 | 10:38 am

      Big Stein didn’t get better, he got older. That happened when he brought Torre in, and Torre had the perfect disposition for dealing with his behavior, and also had a few damn good teams which did a lot of winning. That’s why Stein got better.

      Since there’s only this post about the Yanks losing again and none from the brilliant game they played last night, or the shutout, or the fact that one of the major liabilities going into the season is back hitting HRs again, or that our journeyman utility man is leading the league in average and outhitting Cano, etc. Hey, I enjoy finding positives.

      I haven’t enjoyed watching a Yankee pitcher this much (Tanaka) since the ’70s when Guidry was in his prime.

    9. Greg H.
      May 15th, 2014 | 10:41 am

      Whoops, just realized my middle paragraph wasn’t even a complete sentence. It should have read: “Since… I’ll go ahead and hijack this thread.

    10. Mr. October
      May 15th, 2014 | 3:45 pm

      NC Yankee wrote:

      Not too long ago Yankee fans hated [George Steinbrenner] and his micro management.

      Not fans who could think for themselves, for the most part. Two of the greatest teams of the last century were the 1978 and 1998 N.Y. Yankees, and Mr. Steinbrenner was responsible for bringing in the talent at the executive management level, and spending the money, to put those teams together… This franchise is not going to win with the current people in place and without him.

    11. Raf
      May 17th, 2014 | 9:18 am

      Steve L. wrote:

      Still, the employees feared him because he demanded excellence.

      “George wants everybody to stay in the organization once he fires them. Maybe it’s his way of saying, ‘Well, I am compassionate, I don’t throw anyone out on the street.’ But that’s not compassion. What people want is to be treated like human beings, to be allowed to do the job they were hired to do.” – Dallas Green

      If Steinbrenner demanded excellence, he should’ve let his baseball people do the job they were hired to do

      http://www.hardballtimes.com/the-virtual-1985-1989-new-york-yankees-part-1/
      http://www.hardballtimes.com/the-virtual-1985-1989-new-york-yankees-part-2/

      Now, it’s all about the P&L and not the W&L.

      It always has been about the P&L; the MSG & Addidas deals, creation of the YES network, getting the Stadium deal done…

    12. Mr. October
      May 17th, 2014 | 12:07 pm

      Raf wrote:

      If [George Steinbrenner] demanded excellence, he should’ve let his baseball people do the job they were hired to do…

      Or in some cases, not employ individuals incapable of the excellence he demanded (e.g.: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2097259/Brian-Cashmans-stalker-Louise-Neathway-abortion-claim.html).

    13. Raf
      May 17th, 2014 | 4:50 pm

      @ Mr. October:
      We already know you’re a fuckwit, no need to keep reminding us…

      http://youtu.be/nc_LIR5ExIU

    14. Evan3457
      May 25th, 2014 | 1:46 pm

      Mr. October wrote:

      NC Yankee wrote:
      Not too long ago Yankee fans hated [George Steinbrenner] and his micro management.
      Not fans who could think for themselves, for the most part. Two of the greatest teams of the last century were the 1978 and 1998 N.Y. Yankees, and Mr. Steinbrenner was responsible for bringing in the talent at the executive management level, and spending the money, to put those teams together… This franchise is not going to win with the current people in place and without him.

      The 1978 Yankees were NOT one of the greatest teams of the last century, unless you mean, perhaps, one of the top 100 teams of the century. They were 4th in the league in runs scored, and while they finished 1st in league ERA, spent about half the season with only two reliable starting pitchers and the other half with only two solid relivers, having to move Dick Tidrow into the rotation to bolster it.

      The 1978 were a tough team, a smart team, and lots of fun to watch, if you ignored the Bronx Zoo craziness, but they were not an all-time great team. Not close, really.

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.