• Rafael Palmeiro

    Posted by on November 30th, 2016 · Comments (7)

    This sounds crazy. Sincerely, even to myself as I pen these thoughts, it seems a tad bizarre. But, I think it’s time to give Rafael Palmeiro a buddy pass.

    Why?

    Timing and the times.

    Palmeiro’s career ran from 1986 through 2005. To me, that’s pretty much aligned perfectly with the steroid loosey-goosey period, as A-Rod liked to call it.

    While it’s hard to say when the PED thing blossomed, it’s not unreasonable to think it started around 1983 (give or take). And, we know that Major League Baseball did not roll out a PED policy with teeth until after the 2004 season. So, to me, 1983 (or so) through 2004 was the wild, wild west of PED use in baseball. People did what they wanted and had no marshal in town since the baseball establishment – owners, players and media – pretty much completely looked the other way. There were no baseball laws to break on PED use – and anyone using at that time was not breaking any baseball laws.

    Ah, yes, the law. There’s always “that.” Clearly, those using PEDs when Palmeiro played were breaking the law in that they most likely obtained the drugs illegally and were administering them without a medical doctor’s supervision. A crime? Sure…yes…no question. Then again, was it that much different from the 1950′s, 60′s and 70′s when players, with the clubs’ somewhat blessing, were taking greenies (like candy) which were being used without a doctor’s script and coming from shady sources? Further, last time I checked, no one has been ever kept out of the Hall of Fame because they drank coffee everyday laced with amphetamines (supplied in the clubhouse before games in the “old days.”)

    No, I haven’t forgotten about the time when Palmeiro emphatically wagged his finger back in March of 2005, claiming that he never used PEDs.

    However, think about it:  What was he supposed to say at that point? If he tried to plead the Fifth like McGwire or pretend that he didn’t speak English like Sosa, he would have been branded as being a user. And, if no one else was going to confess at that time, why should he?

    “He cheated!,” many probably still want to say here. Well…you can say that…but, he “cheated” to do better on the field. This is not like the 1919 White Sox where people were throwing baseball games. There is an old saying in baseball: “If you’re not cheating, you’re not trying.” Guys doctor baseballs, steal signs, withhold medical information, fake dates of birth, add inches to their height and shave pounds off their weight, and do other things like that in baseball – all the time. If “cheating” is bending or dancing around the rules, then there’s all sorts of cheating going on in baseball whether folks are called on it or not.

    In the end, I am somewhat confident that Rafael Palmeiro will be the modern-day Shoeless Joe Jackson. One hundred years will pass and he’ll still be on the outside, looking in.

    Maybe, if someone like Jim Thome, Frank Thomas or Jeff Bagwell gets outed for PED use after they were elected to the Hall of Fame, it will open a door for someone like Palmeiro to have their career re-examined?

    In the meantime, it will be McGwire, Sosa and Palmeiro. They’re the PED poster boys. Nothing really to do at this point but to wear it.

    The Class Of 1968-1982

    Posted by on November 29th, 2016 · Comments (7)
    Rk Player WAR/pos From To Age G PA HR RBI BB SB BA OBP SLG
    1 Joe Morgan 81.4 1968 1982 24-38 1980 8498 221 904 1432 602 .275 .397 .438
    2 Rod Carew 74.7 1968 1982 22-36 1983 8557 77 850 820 333 .334 .398 .440
    3 Johnny Bench 74.4 1968 1982 20-34 2022 8247 376 1316 862 68 .269 .345 .480
    4 Reggie Jackson 74.3 1968 1982 22-36 2136 8809 463 1380 1055 215 .273 .365 .515
    6 Pete Rose 62.5 1968 1982 27-41 2340 10779 109 862 1105 139 .313 .387 .425
    7 Reggie Smith 61.4 1968 1982 23-37 1823 7395 299 1031 833 121 .291 .371 .499
    8 Graig Nettles 60.3 1968 1982 23-37 1989 8021 313 1011 835 31 .250 .330 .425
    11 Carl Yastrzemski 59.1 1968 1982 28-42 2125 8948 303 1206 1260 116 .279 .380 .454
    16 Tony Perez 49.4 1968 1982 26-40 2095 8735 321 1343 768 47 .282 .345 .473
    17 Ted Simmons 48.4 1968 1982 18-32 1801 7444 209 1087 679 11 .291 .355 .453
    22 Willie Stargell 45.9 1968 1982 28-42 1707 6555 363 1129 744 12 .283 .368 .540
    27 Al Oliver 43.9 1968 1982 21-35 1996 8374 206 1163 452 79 .305 .346 .462
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 11/29/2016.

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    Reggie. Top 4. Close to being #2.

    Chris Carter

    Posted by on November 28th, 2016 · Comments (1)

    This has Cashman written all over it.

    BHM. (Big Hairy Monster.)

    Ten Kids

    Posted by on November 27th, 2016 · Comments (2)

    Is it possible that all ten of these players will be on the Yankees Opening Day roster in 2017?

    Tyler Austin
    Luis Cessa
    Nick Goody
    Aaron Judge
    Rob Refsnyder
    Gary Sanchez
    Ronald Torreyes
    Greg Bird
    Bryan Mitchell
    Dellin Betances

    My Rules

    Posted by on November 21st, 2016 · Comments (10)

    I keep reading that the Yankees are going to sign at least two “big free agents” this off-season.

    Boy…would that be a mistake.

    This stuff has to stop. In a perfect world, barring a Jeter or Rivera type situation which is far and few between, I wish the Yankees never had a player over the age of 35…AND…had no one on their payroll making more than $17 million a year.

    Old players and $100 million dollar contracts are a death sentence these days. The Yankees should have learned that by now. Of course, they still have Cashman as a G.M. as well. And, that means they don’t learn from mistakes.

    Sad.

    Goodbye Brian McCann

    Posted by on November 17th, 2016 · Comments (11)

    Wow.

    McCann PLUS cash for two pitchers who have never faced a batter in Double-A.

    Geesh.

     

    Tanaka Vs. deGrom 2014-2016

    Posted by on November 17th, 2016 · Comments (1)
    Player WAR From To Age G GS W L W-L% BB SO ERA FIP ERA+ BF
    Masahiro Tanaka 11.7 2014 2016 25-27 75 75 39 16 .709 84 445 3.12 3.53 132 1956
    Jacob deGrom 11.6 2014 2016 26-28 76 76 30 22 .577 117 492 2.74 2.88 138 1920
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 11/17/2016.

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    The WAR, Games, ERA+ and Batters Faced numbers are almost identical.

    Yankees, OPS+ 125 or Better, 2,500+ PA

    Posted by on November 14th, 2016 · Comments (1)
    Rk Player OPS+ PA From To Age G R H 2B HR RBI BB SO SB BA OBP SLG
    1 Babe Ruth 209 9199 1920 1934 25-39 2084 1959 2518 424 659 1978 1852 1122 110 .349 .484 .711
    2 Lou Gehrig 179 9663 1923 1939 20-36 2164 1888 2721 534 493 1995 1508 790 102 .340 .447 .632
    3 Mickey Mantle 172 9907 1951 1968 19-36 2401 1676 2415 344 536 1509 1733 1710 153 .298 .421 .557
    4 Joe DiMaggio 155 7672 1936 1951 21-36 1736 1390 2214 389 361 1537 790 369 30 .325 .398 .579
    5 Charlie Keller 152 4466 1939 1952 22-35 1066 712 1053 163 184 723 760 481 45 .286 .410 .518
    6 Reggie Jackson 148 2707 1977 1981 31-35 653 380 661 115 144 461 326 573 41 .281 .371 .526
    7 Jason Giambi 143 3693 2002 2008 31-37 897 515 764 134 209 604 619 706 9 .260 .404 .521
    8 Roger Maris 139 3475 1960 1966 25-31 850 520 797 110 203 547 413 417 7 .265 .356 .515
    9 Alex Rodriguez 136 6520 2004 2016 28-40 1509 1012 1580 263 351 1096 779 1292 152 .283 .378 .523
    10 Rickey Henderson 135 2735 1985 1989 26-30 596 513 663 119 78 255 406 281 326 .288 .395 .455
    11 Dave Winfield 134 5021 1981 1990 29-38 1172 722 1300 236 205 818 477 652 76 .290 .356 .495
    12 Tommy Henrich 132 5409 1937 1950 24-37 1284 901 1297 269 183 795 712 383 37 .282 .382 .491
    13 Bobby Murcer 129 4997 1965 1983 19-37 1256 641 1231 192 175 687 491 564 74 .278 .349 .453
    14 Bill Skowron 129 4102 1954 1962 23-31 1087 518 1103 173 165 672 278 588 14 .294 .346 .496
    15 Don Mattingly 127 7722 1982 1995 21-34 1785 1007 2153 442 222 1099 588 444 14 .307 .358 .471
    16 Bill Dickey 127 7065 1928 1946 21-39 1789 930 1969 343 202 1209 678 289 36 .313 .382 .486
    17 George Selkirk 127 3322 1934 1942 26-34 846 503 810 131 108 576 486 319 49 .290 .400 .483
    18 Robinson Cano 126 5791 2005 2013 22-30 1374 799 1649 375 204 822 350 689 38 .309 .355 .504
    19 Bernie Williams 125 9053 1991 2006 22-37 2076 1366 2336 449 287 1257 1069 1212 147 .297 .381 .477
    20 Paul O’Neill 125 5368 1993 2001 30-38 1254 720 1426 304 185 858 586 710 80 .303 .377 .492
    21 Yogi Berra 125 8350 1946 1963 21-38 2116 1174 2148 321 358 1430 704 411 30 .285 .348 .483
    22 Earle Combs 125 6513 1924 1935 25-36 1456 1186 1866 309 58 633 670 278 98 .325 .397 .462
    23 Birdie Cree 125 2989 1908 1915 25-32 742 345 761 117 11 332 269 274 132 .292 .368 .398
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 11/14/2016.

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    Look at Reggie.  No wonder why they named a candy bar after him.

    50+ Games As A Yankee OPS+ 140 or Better

    Posted by on November 14th, 2016 · Comments (1)

    Crazy list.

    Rk Player OPS+ G From To Age PA
    1 Babe Ruth 209 2084 1920 1934 25-39 9199
    2 Lou Gehrig 179 2164 1923 1939 20-36 9663
    3 Mickey Mantle 172 2401 1951 1968 19-36 9907
    4 Gary Sanchez 166 55 2015 2016 22-23 231
    5 Joe DiMaggio 155 1736 1936 1951 21-36 7672
    6 Charlie Keller 152 1066 1939 1952 22-35 4466
    7 Bobby Bonds 151 145 1975 1975 29-29 626
    8 Reggie Jackson 148 653 1977 1981 31-35 2707
    9 Ron Blomberg 148 400 1969 1976 20-27 1324
    10 Dale Long 146 81 1960 1963 34-37 175
    11 Jason Giambi 143 897 2002 2008 31-37 3693
    12 Don Bollweg 142 70 1953 1953 32-32 178
    13 Oscar Gamble 141 540 1976 1984 26-34 1707
    14 Jack Lelivelt 141 54 1912 1913 26-27 184
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 11/14/2016.

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    Giambi = Reggie + Blomberg.

    What A Game!

    Posted by on November 3rd, 2016 · Comments (8)

    The 10 best World Series Game Seven contests just may be 2016, 2014, 2001, 1997, 1991, 1962, 1960, 1946, 1926, and 1924. In terms of grabbing national attention, for sundry reasons, you could slice the list down to 2016, 2001, 1991 and 1960 as the top four – with TV coverage giving them an assist. Picking which one of these four is the best Game Seven ever would be difficult. One thing to note is that the home team won in 1960, 1991 and 2001 – and that was not the case in 2016. This adds the element of the winning team still needing to get 3 outs to win, compared to walking off with the victory. Perhaps this additional degree of difficulty makes 2016 stand out a bit more?

    Tonight’s Game 7 In Cleveland

    Posted by on November 2nd, 2016 · Comments (5)

    This season, Kyle Hendricks, on the road, in a hitter’s ballpark, is a good pitcher – but, not a great one. That said, expect to see Jon Lester in this game tonight at some point for the Cubs. And, when that happens, Cleveland better be aggressive on the bases. (And, maybe that’s a reason for Francona to play Guyer, Davis and Crisp in the outfield tonight and bench Chisenhall and Naquin?) On the flip side, Corey Kluber should be good for 50 pitches and 4 effective innings tonight, at the least. Then, you’re going to see Shaw, Miller and Allen. Of course, Schwarber, Rizzo, Bryant, Zobrist and company can swing the bats. But, good pitching beats good hitting. If Kluber, Shaw, Miller and Allen are on tonight, I see Cleveland winning a close contest. To me, that’s the key to the game tonight: Cleveland’s best pitchers against Chicago’s great hitters. Whomever wins those battles will win the war.