• Rare Baby Bombers Season?

    Posted by on January 30th, 2017 · Comments (1)

    There’s a CHANCE that the Yankees COULD have 5+ players in 2017 age 27 or younger play 100+ games in the season season.

    The last time that happened in Yankeeland was 1968. (And, that’s a long time ago.) In fact, it’s only happened twice since 1959.

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    As you can see above, it’s only happened 12 times in franchise history.  And, half of those times was before 1932.

    1B, RF and The Last Two Rotation Spots

    Posted by on January 25th, 2017 · Comments (14)

    Those are the only real question marks for the Yankees in 2017, in terms of not knowing for sure who is going to fill those roles.

    But, what about the positions that we do know about?

    Up the middle, last year, Didi Gregorius (OPS+ 97) and Starlin Castro (OPS+ 93) where below league average offensive performers. And, per the sabermetric stats, neither one of them was a league average defender. (Castro, in fact, was very bad.)

    At third, Chase Headley was very much improved (compared to 2015) with the glove. But, he also was a below league average offensive performer.

    As far as DH, well, Matt Holliday has to prove that he’s not washed up.

    Don’t even get me started on Jacoby Ellsbury. And, Brett Gardner? He’s become a slap hitter who doesn’t run. This year could be anything when it comes to him – either he rebounds, stays the same, or gets worse.

    Lastly, in terms of hitters, while I hope Gary Sanchez has a great year, we don’t know for sure what’s going to happen there.

    On the pitching side, Tanaka and Sabathia have health/mileage concerns – yet, should be OK. But, does anyone have faith in Michael Pineda?

    For the last 4 seasons, on average, the Yankees have been an 84 win team. Even if everything works out with 1B, RF and those last two rotation spots, how can anyone be confident that the Yankees are any better than they have been since 2013?

    PEDs and The HOF

    Posted by on January 19th, 2017 · Comments (3)

    Many like to say that Mike Piazza and (now) Jeff Bagwell open the door to the Hall of Fame for those suspected of using PEDs and those found to use PEDs. However, their careers were basically before there were rules around PED use. (We know that Major League Baseball did not roll out a PED policy with teeth until after the 2004 season.) It’s really hard to ticket someone for speeding, much less just pull them over, when there’s no speed limit posted. And, what about Ivan “Pudge” Rodriguez? Yes, I know: Jose Canseco confessed that he introduced Pudge to PEDs. But, look at the numbers. From 1991-2004, Pudge played 1758 games and had an OPS+ of 115. From 2005 through 2011, he played 785 games and had an OPS+ of 85. And, remember: in Spring Training 2005, Pudge showed up 20 pounds lighter than he was in previous years. If Pudge was using PEDs, there’s some evidence to point towards him no longer using them once there was a policy against them. All of this is probably why Piazza, Bagwell and Pudge are in the Hall of Fame now – it’s suspicion only and all pre-policy. You are going to see the same thing with Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds. Granted, there’s more than just a suspicion with them. But, the bulk of their body of work is pre-policy and there are no suspensions or convictions on their record due to PED use. The two PED cases that will be most interesting with respect to the Hall of Fame are Manny Ramirez and Alex “A-Rod” Rodriguez. Both failed tests twice. Both were suspended for lengthy periods for failing a test AFTER there was a policy against it. Manny is already on the ballot. (This was his first year on it.) A-Rod has to wait 5 years before they vote on him. They may both get elected to the Hall. But, it’s not going to be quick or easy for them.

    Ji-Man Choi

    Posted by on January 16th, 2017 · Comments (2)

    This guy has destroyed minor league pitching. But, why would the Angels just let him go?

    Hey, he could turn out to be the Korean Big Papi. Or, he will be the next Hee-Seop Choi…who also raked in the bush leagues.

    The Yankees 2018 Starting Rotation

    Posted by on January 12th, 2017 · Comments (3)

    Sabathia and Pineda will be free agents.  Tanaka can opt out.    Who does that leave for the season after this one?

    Who Had A Better “Yankees” Career, A-Rod Or Willie Randolph?

    Posted by on January 4th, 2017 · Comments (2)
    Rk Player WAR/pos From To Age G PA R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SH SF SB BA OBP SLG
    8 Alex Rodriguez 54.2 2004 2016 28-40 1509 6520 1012 1580 263 9 351 1096 779 0 60 152 .283 .378 .523
    9 Willie Randolph 53.7 1976 1988 21-33 1694 7464 1027 1731 259 58 48 549 1005 75 54 251 .275 .374 .357
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 1/4/2017.

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    Retire #30 before even thinking about #13!

    So, Here’s The Biggest Question In Yankeeland This Year…

    Posted by on January 4th, 2017 · Comments (4)

    Will 2017 be the first time in the last 19 years that the Yankees fail to draw three million at home? I think they have a good shot at it – watching their attendance trend.

    Rk Year Tm G W L Ties W-L% Finish GB Playoffs Attendance
    1 2016 New York Yankees 162 84 78 0 .519 4th of 5 9.0 3,063,405
    2 2015 New York Yankees 162 87 75 0 .537 2nd of 5 6.0 Lost ALWC (1-0) 3,193,795
    3 2014 New York Yankees 162 84 78 0 .519 2nd of 5 12.0 3,401,624
    4 2013 New York Yankees 162 85 77 0 .525 3rd of 5 12.0 3,279,589
    5 2012 New York Yankees 162 95 67 0 .586 1st of 5 Lost ALCS (4-0) 3,542,406
    6 2011 New York Yankees 162 97 65 0 .599 1st of 5 Lost LDS (3-2) 3,653,680
    7 2010 New York Yankees 162 95 67 0 .586 2nd of 5 1.0 Lost ALCS (4-2) 3,765,807
    8 2009 New York Yankees 162 103 59 0 .636 1st of 5 Won WS (4-2) 3,719,358
    9 2008 New York Yankees 162 89 73 0 .549 3rd of 5 8.0 4,298,655
    10 2007 New York Yankees 162 94 68 0 .580 2nd of 5 2.0 Lost LDS (3-1) 4,271,083
    11 2006 New York Yankees 162 97 65 0 .599 1st of 5 Lost LDS (3-1) 4,248,067
    12 2005 New York Yankees 162 95 67 0 .586 1st of 5 Lost LDS (3-2) 4,090,696
    13 2004 New York Yankees 162 101 61 0 .623 1st of 5 Lost ALCS (4-3) 3,775,292
    14 2003 New York Yankees 163 101 61 1 .623 1st of 5 Lost WS (4-2) 3,465,600
    15 2002 New York Yankees 161 103 58 0 .640 1st of 5 Lost LDS (3-1) 3,465,807
    16 2001 New York Yankees 161 95 65 1 .594 1st of 5 Lost WS (4-3) 3,264,907
    17 2000 New York Yankees 161 87 74 0 .540 1st of 5 Won WS (4-1) 3,055,435
    18 1999 New York Yankees 162 98 64 0 .605 1st of 5 Won WS (4-0) 3,292,736
    19 1998 New York Yankees 162 114 48 0 .704 1st of 5 Won WS (4-0) 2,955,193
    20 1997 New York Yankees 162 96 66 0 .593 2nd of 5 2.0 Lost LDS (3-2) 2,580,325
    21 1996 New York Yankees 162 92 70 0 .568 1st of 5 Won WS (4-2) 2,250,877
    22 1995 New York Yankees 145 79 65 1 .549 2nd of 5 7.0 Lost LDS (3-2) 1,705,263
    23 1994 New York Yankees 113 70 43 0 .619 1st of 5 1,675,556
    24 1993 New York Yankees 162 88 74 0 .543 2nd of 7 7.0 2,416,942
    25 1992 New York Yankees 162 76 86 0 .469 4th of 7 20.0 1,748,737
    26 1991 New York Yankees 162 71 91 0 .438 5th of 7 20.0 1,863,733
    27 1990 New York Yankees 162 67 95 0 .414 7th of 7 21.0 2,006,436
    28 1989 New York Yankees 161 74 87 0 .460 5th of 7 14.5 2,170,485
    29 1988 New York Yankees 161 85 76 0 .528 5th of 7 3.5 2,633,701
    30 1987 New York Yankees 162 89 73 0 .549 4th of 7 9.0 2,427,672
    31 1986 New York Yankees 162 90 72 0 .556 2nd of 7 5.5 2,268,030
    32 1985 New York Yankees 161 97 64 0 .602 2nd of 7 2.0 2,214,587
    33 1984 New York Yankees 162 87 75 0 .537 3rd of 7 17.0 1,821,815
    34 1983 New York Yankees 162 91 71 0 .562 3rd of 7 7.0 2,257,976
    35 1982 New York Yankees 162 79 83 0 .488 5th of 7 16.0 2,041,219
    36 1981 New York Yankees 107 59 48 0 .551 4th of 7 2.0 Lost WS (4-2) 1,614,353
    37 1980 New York Yankees 162 103 59 0 .636 1st of 7 Lost ALCS (3-0) 2,627,417
    38 1979 New York Yankees 160 89 71 0 .556 4th of 7 13.5 2,537,765
    39 1978 New York Yankees 163 100 63 0 .613 1st of 7 Won WS (4-2) 2,335,871
    40 1977 New York Yankees 162 100 62 0 .617 1st of 7 Won WS (4-2) 2,103,092
    41 1976 New York Yankees 159 97 62 0 .610 1st of 6 Lost WS (4-0) 2,012,434
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
    Generated 1/4/2017.

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    Big Hairy Monster Roll Call

    Posted by on January 3rd, 2017 · Comments (0)

    Jesus Montero is now an Oriole. Peter O’Brien is now a Royal.

    Gary Sanchez is still in the house.

    Ladies and Gentlemen, The Great Number Seven

    Posted by on January 2nd, 2017 · Comments (0)

    Mickey Mantle has been dead for over 21 years.

    When Mantle retired, you can make a case that he was the 5th greatest position player of all time (after Babe Ruth’s retirement):

    Rk Player WAR/pos ▾ From To Age G PA HR RBI BB SB BA OBP SLG
    1 Willie Mays 139.8 1951 1968 20-37 2446 10386 587 1654 1137 299 .308 .384 .578
    2 Stan Musial 128.1 1941 1963 20-42 3026 12718 475 1951 1599 78 .331 .417 .559
    3 Ted Williams 123.1 1939 1960 20-41 2292 9788 521 1839 2021 24 .344 .482 .634
    4 Hank Aaron 111.2 1954 1968 20-34 2279 9888 510 1627 866 215 .314 .373 .560
    5 Mickey Mantle 109.7 1951 1968 19-36 2401 9907 536 1509 1733 153 .298 .421 .557
    6 Eddie Mathews 96.4 1952 1968 20-36 2391 10100 512 1453 1444 68 .271 .376 .509
    7 Frank Robinson 80.6 1956 1968 20-32 1916 8159 418 1277 929 182 .302 .392 .556
    8 Al Kaline 79.0 1953 1968 18-33 2095 8731 314 1247 942 123 .304 .380 .495
    9 Joe DiMaggio 78.1 1936 1951 21-36 1736 7672 361 1537 790 30 .325 .398 .579
    10 Johnny Mize 71.0 1936 1953 23-40 1883 7370 359 1337 856 28 .312 .397 .562
    11 Roberto Clemente 69.5 1955 1968 20-33 1953 8220 184 1008 472 75 .312 .353 .464
    12 Ernie Banks 69.0 1953 1968 22-37 2262 9426 474 1480 695 50 .277 .333 .508
    13 Duke Snider 66.5 1947 1964 20-37 2143 8237 407 1333 971 99 .295 .380 .540
    14 Pee Wee Reese 66.4 1940 1958 21-39 2166 9470 126 885 1210 232 .269 .366 .377
    15 Richie Ashburn 63.6 1948 1962 21-35 2189 9736 29 586 1198 234 .308 .396 .382
    16 Ken Boyer 63.0 1955 1968 24-37 2009 8236 282 1137 711 105 .288 .349 .463
    17 Lou Boudreau 63.0 1938 1952 20-34 1646 7024 68 789 796 51 .295 .380 .415
    18 Jackie Robinson 61.5 1947 1956 28-37 1382 5804 137 734 740 197 .311 .409 .474
    19 Luke Appling 59.8 1936 1950 29-43 1759 7522 32 806 996 138 .316 .409 .400
    20 Yogi Berra 59.5 1946 1965 21-40 2120 8359 358 1430 704 30 .285 .348 .482
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 1/2/2017.

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    Mantle’s prime was the mid-to-late 50′s to early 60′s.  If you were 15-years old in 1960, that would make you over 70 years old today.  The audience of those who saw Mantle at his best is aging out.

    Kids today – and many young Yankees fans, I suspect – have no idea how great Mickey Mantle was with respect to the time that he played and when his career ended.

    That’s a shame.