• Joe Girardi

    Posted by on October 26th, 2017 · Comments (10)

    He managed the team for 10 full seasons and averaged 91 wins a year. He was never an embarrassment to the franchise off the field.

    Good luck finding someone better than that…

    Comments on Joe Girardi

    1. Evan3457
      October 26th, 2017 | 1:50 pm

      They might. They might not. Let’s see who they go to.

    2. Raf
      October 26th, 2017 | 1:56 pm

      They said the same after Torre.

      I’m surprised Girardi’s contract wasn’t renewed. Apparently, he and Cashman aren’t on the same page, since it was Cashman who recommended they go in a different direction.

      I’m curious to see who Girardi’s replacement will be.

    3. October 26th, 2017 | 9:48 pm

      I have two questions, Did he get the most out of the team that was put together by Cashman? I don’t think there was a year in the ten years Girardi managed that the answer was anything but yes. 2017 he far exceeded expectations, so why we find ourselves here is beyond me. The 2nd question is this, if Girardi is judged this harshly, why does Brian Cashman get a pass? If one goes they both should have gone.

    4. Evan3457
      October 27th, 2017 | 1:20 am

      Joseph Maloney wrote:

      I have two questions, Did he get the most out of the team that was put together by Cashman? I don’t think there was a year in the ten years Girardi managed that the answer was anything but yes. 2017 he far exceeded expectations, so why we find ourselves here is beyond me. The 2nd question is this, if Girardi is judged this harshly, why does Brian Cashman get a pass? If one goes they both should have gone.

      The answer to the first question is: not until 2017. The Yankees’ run differential in 2017 was nearly +200, which suggests that they should have won 100 games, not 91, and won the divisional title. This is the first season in Girardi’s 10 years as manager in which the team significantly underperformed the run differential.

      The answer to the 2nd question is: no. Cashman has clearly done well in rebuilding the Yanks on the fly in the last 2 1/2 seasons. There’s no reason to fire him, regardless of their decision on Girardi. Whether Cashman can finish the job, and finish off a title winner or two or three…that, we have yet to see.

    5. October 27th, 2017 | 10:09 pm

      “The answer to the first question is: not until 2017. The Yankees’ run differential in 2017 was nearly +200, which suggests that they should have won 100 games, not 91, and won the divisional title. This is the first season in Girardi’s 10 years as manager in which the team significantly underperformed the run differential”.

      My mistake, I thought Girardi did a hell of a job this season, getting a young team in a rebuilding year within one game of the World Series, guess I was wrong. Funny I went back and looked at the predictions coming into the season SI, SB Nation and Bleacher Report didn’t think much of the team, as a matter of fact, I can’t find or think of anyone who gave the team any shot of doing anything this year.

      With respect to Cashman, If Girardi goes then Cashman should go right along with him (based on this year’s performance I would not have suggested firing either). Cashman’s body of work in the last eight years has produced not a single World Series appearance.

      I agree with Steve, good luck finding a replacement, and should this team stagger next year, Cashman should be fired. No excuses, no Mulligan, no nothing. Let’s see him judged the same way Girardi was judged.

    6. Raf
      October 30th, 2017 | 7:51 am

      It seems part of the problem was the way Girardi treated analytics. Strange considering the flack he got for over reliance on his binder.

    7. Evan3457
      October 30th, 2017 | 8:00 pm

      Joseph Maloney wrote:

      “The answer to the first question is: not until 2017. The Yankees’ run differential in 2017 was nearly +200, which suggests that they should have won 100 games, not 91, and won the divisional title. This is the first season in Girardi’s 10 years as manager in which the team significantly underperformed the run differential”.
      My mistake, I thought Girardi did a hell of a job this season, getting a young team in a rebuilding year within one game of the World Series, guess I was wrong. Funny I went back and looked at the predictions coming into the season SI, SB Nation and Bleacher Report didn’t think much of the team, as a matter of fact, I can’t find or think of anyone who gave the team any shot of doing anything this year.
      With respect to Cashman, If Girardi goes then Cashman should go right along with him (based on this year’s performance I would not have suggested firing either). Cashman’s body of work in the last eight years has produced not a single World Series appearance.
      I agree with Steve, good luck finding a replacement, and should this team stagger next year, Cashman should be fired. No excuses, no Mulligan, no nothing. Let’s see him judged the same way Girardi was judged.

      The young players played great, beyond anyone’s expectations as a group. But this was the first year in Girardi’s tenure as manager that the bullpen never jelled, and the repeated blown saves and late losses started the mini-collapse mid-June. The team didn’t recover from that for almost two months. The multiple repeated failures of the relievers is the proximate cause of the underperformance vis a vis the run differential. It’s easy to blame Girardi for that, and most of it isn’t truly his fault.

      The TALENT made the Yanks a +200 team, not Girardi. The sudden major moves forward by Judge and Severino, and, to a lesser extent, Hicks and Gregorius, and the addition of Montgomery were not caused by Girardi’s handling of them, though I do give him and Rothchild credit for allowing Montgomery to win the 5th starter’s job in the spring. (Another large piece of the improvement over 2016 was Sanchez being on the roster for most of the season, instead of 2 months.) With regard to Girardi’s firing, I can take it or leave it. I have no strong feeling either way.

      Girardi aside, there is no plausible reason for letting Cashman go at this point. Under Hal’s overall plan, the Yankees stayed in some semblance of contention every year while simultaneously undergoing a complete rebuild of the organization, and simultaneously shedding salary to finally get under the payroll cap for the luxury tax. The Yankees didn’t tank for three years or more in order to rebuild as the Cubs, Astros, Mets, and Royals did. The result is a young, talented team on the way up, a bunch of additional prospects on the way, some with high-ceilings, and, after next season, approximately 40 gazillion dollars to deploy in what looks like it will be the greatest free agent market in recent memory.

      In the interim, it is likely, but not definite, that the Yanks will be a better team next season. Ever if they are better, they might not get as close to the World Series as they did this season. It is VERY likely that next year will be a consolidation year, and if that does come to pass, there will still be no plausible reason to fire Cashman, unless the manager proves himself to be the baseball equivalent of Ray Handley or Rich Kotite.

    8. EHawk
      October 31st, 2017 | 12:44 am

      Glad Girardi wasn’t renewed. I was never a fan of his and from the sounds of it either were many of the players. In the end the guy won 1 World Series in 10 years…he had other good teams that didn’t meet expectations. I think if you were told back when he was hired that Yanks would only win 1 World Series in the next 10 years under him you wouldn’t of signed up for that.

    9. KPOcala
      October 31st, 2017 | 11:29 am

      I’ve read a few articles intimating that Girardi’s temper over the years went from 0-100 quicker and quicker. Hell, I’ve seen an interview or two that surprised me (my dad had the old “Italian Temper”), maybe he scared Cashman. It would be rough having to go up against a jacked Girardi every day. IMO, this talk of difference because of “analytics” is crap. Just how more effective would Cashman’s “analytics” v “The Binder”? Would the players have hit better? Pitched better? Could the computers look into the eyes of players in a funk, or in a high cycle? No. That talk is absurd. It’s a “personal thing”.

    10. redbug
      October 31st, 2017 | 1:11 pm

      @ EHawk:

      I was never a fan of Girardi either. I loved Torre and would never have treated him like crap the way the Yankees did. Cashman limited his replacement choice among Girardi, Pena and Mattingly. Among those 3, I would have chosen Mattingly.

      I always felt Girardi was way to high strung and too fond of his binder. That’s a poor temperament for young players. I didn’t like him calling-out Sanchez in public. (I also didn’t like the way he handled the end of Posada’s career – esp not letting him catch Mo’s last game)

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.