• Dick Allen Had More Big Seasons Than A-Rod

    Posted by on January 27th, 2013 · Comments (3)

    The numbers speak for themselves.

    Right-handed batters since 1901 to qualify for the batting title and have an OPS+ of 140 or better seven plus times in their career:

    Rk Yrs From To Age
    1 Hank Aaron 18 1955 1972 21-38 Ind. Seasons
    2 Willie Mays 16 1954 1971 23-40 Ind. Seasons
    3 Frank Robinson 15 1956 1974 20-38 Ind. Seasons
    4 Manny Ramirez 13 1995 2008 23-36 Ind. Seasons
    5 Mike Schmidt 13 1974 1987 24-37 Ind. Seasons
    6 Rogers Hornsby 13 1916 1931 20-35 Ind. Seasons
    7 Albert Pujols 12 2001 2012 21-32 Ind. Seasons
    8 Jimmie Foxx 12 1928 1940 20-32 Ind. Seasons
    9 Honus Wagner 11 1901 1912 27-38 Ind. Seasons
    10 Dick Allen 10 1964 1974 22-32 Ind. Seasons
    11 Jeff Bagwell 9 1993 2001 25-33 Ind. Seasons
    12 Edgar Martinez 9 1992 2003 29-40 Ind. Seasons
    13 Frank Thomas 9 1991 2003 23-35 Ind. Seasons
    14 Joe DiMaggio 9 1937 1950 22-35 Ind. Seasons
    15 Harry Heilmann 9 1921 1930 26-35 Ind. Seasons
    16 Alex Rodriguez 8 1996 2008 20-32 Ind. Seasons
    17 Mike Piazza 8 1993 2001 24-32 Ind. Seasons
    18 Gary Sheffield 8 1992 2004 23-35 Ind. Seasons
    19 Harmon Killebrew 8 1960 1970 24-34 Ind. Seasons
    20 Nap Lajoie 8 1901 1912 26-37 Ind. Seasons
    21 Miguel Cabrera 7 2005 2012 22-29 Ind. Seasons
    22 Vladimir Guerrero 7 1998 2007 23-32 Ind. Seasons
    23 Mark McGwire 7 1987 1999 23-35 Ind. Seasons
    24 Roberto Clemente 7 1961 1971 26-36 Ind. Seasons
    25 Hank Greenberg 7 1934 1946 23-35 Ind. Seasons
    26 Al Simmons 7 1925 1931 23-29 Ind. Seasons
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 1/27/2013.

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    Of course, A-Rod had more overall seasons than Crash where he was pretty darn good.

    Memorabilia Dealer Wants To Know If Carlos Delgado Used PEDs

    Posted by on January 27th, 2013 · Comments (1)

    Via the Daily News

    Mets fans had plenty of reasons to be optimistic after the 2006 season. The club — led by a slugging first baseman who appeared en route to a 500-plus home run career and a shortstop who could steal bases and hit for power — won the National League East by 12 games and went to Game 7 of the National League Championship Series.

    Mets fans, of course, never got the chance to see Carlos Delgado and Jose Reyes spray World Series champagne all over each other. The Mets didn’t make the playoffs in 2007 and 2008 thanks to epic late-season collapses, and they’ve struggled to remain relevant in the standings ever since.

    But Delgado and Reyes are together again — this time in Nassau County Supreme Court. Sports memorabilia dealer Spencer Lader and other defendants in the case want Reyes, now with the Blue Jays, to tell them under oath what he knows about Delgado’s relationship with Anthony Galea, the controversial Toronto sports medicine doctor — and human growth hormone proponent — who pleaded guilty in July 2011 to transporting misbranded and unapproved drugs into the United States.

    “I’m not saying Delgado used steroids, but I do have a right to know if he did,” Lader says. “We thought his name had commercial value, but everybody knows players linked to steroids have no commercial value.

    “I want to be the first person in memorabilia to keep these people accountable,” adds Lader, whose Authentic Memorabilia made headlines in 2007 when it marketed Darryl Strawberry- and Jason Giambi-autographed baseballs that said “Everybody deserves a second chance.”

    Delgado signed an agreement with Lader in 2006 that made Lader his exclusive autographed memorabilia dealer. Lader says he later brought in other partners, including Nitin Doshi, the wealthy owner of a Long Island medical imaging company. The deal had soured by 2009 when the ex-Met filed suit in Nassau County Supreme Court, claiming that Lader, Doshi and the other defendants stiffed him out of at least $767,500. The defendants dispute Delgado’s claims; Lader says he should not even be a party to the suit because Doshi bought out his interest in the deal.

    Lader’s attorney Robert McKay subpoenaed Reyes last year to question him about Galea, the Canadian physician who agreed to a plea deal and was sentenced to a year of supervised release in December 2011.

    “Did he have acne on his back? Did they talk to each other about Galea or steroids? We have a right to ask those questions,” Lader says.

    Galea, who worked with both former Mets and numerous other athletes, including Alex Rodriguez and Tiger Woods, was indicted on five drug-related counts in October 2010. He became a target for law-enforcement agencies on both sides of the border a year earlier, after American authorities found growth hormone and other drugs in his assistant’s car as she tried to cross the border.

    “The essence of the information sought from Mr. Reyes in the subpoena directed to him relates to the use of steroids or human growth hormones or performance-enhancing drugs by the plaintiff, Carlos Delgado, by way of documents and testimony that Mr. Reyes is likely to provide,” court papers filed by McKay earlier this month.

    Delgado’s lawyer, Michael Re, has tried to have the subpoena quashed. An attorney from Re’s firm, Moritt, Hock and Hamroff, said he could not comment on the litigation.

    Justice Timothy Driscoll, according to McKay, said at a hearing last week that he is inclined to permit Lader’s lawyer to depose Reyes, but he would defer his decision until after Delgado is deposed. McKay said he expects to question Delgado sometime next month.

    In a suit filed last summer in Central Islip federal court, Lader says Delgado was paid a “substantial portion” of the $325,000 the memorabilia dealer and his the other defendants agreed to pay him for the first year of a two-year deal.

    But the slugger proved difficult to work with. Delgado signed A-Rod baseball bats — instead of bats with his own name — and sent those to the memorabilia dealers to sell, the lawsuit says. His signature was “virtually invisible” on blue Mets caps because he used a black pen. His autograph was smudged on signed baseballs. The memorabilia Delgado supplied to his partners, the suit says, were “worth nothing or close to nothing.”

    Delgado never did reach the 500 home run club. He hit 473 home runs in a career that ended with a whimper. Delgado played in just 26 games for the Mets in 2009 before his season ended that May with hip surgery. Hip problems are a long-term side effect of performance-enhancing drug use, Lader notes.

    I don’t think this guy has a snowball’s chance in you know where to get the answers he seeks and/or any of his money back. But, as a guy who owns a Barry Bonds autographed bat and a Roger Clemens autographed baseball, which I bought around the year 2001, I feel his pain. (And, yes, years later, I realized that the autographed memorabilia thing is s sucker’s market. I can’t begin to tell you how many balls have turned brown, how many signatures have faded, or careers have turned among my collection. That’s why I stopped adding to it several years back.)

    The Brian Greer Story

    Posted by on January 26th, 2013 · Comments (0)

    He’s an interesting story, from what I can tell.

    Brian Greer was drafted by the San Diego Padres in the 1st round of the 1977 amateur draft. In fact, he was the 8th overall selection of the draft.

    He struggled in Low-A ball that season, after signing. Nonetheless, the Padres called him up in 1977 and he got into one game where he batted once and struck out (at the age of 18).

    The next two seasons weren’t that much better for him. He played Double-A in 1978 and 1979 and was not tearing up the league with the bat, by any stretch of the imagination. Although, he did manage to get into a few big league games in 1979.

    He continued to stink in 1980 and 1981 down in the minors. However, in 1982, at the age of 23, playing at both Double-A and Triple-A, he was a three-outcome role model. All told, he batted 566 times and had 31 homers, 103 walks and 202 strikeouts. Combined, his BA/OBA/SLG line was .252/.393/.535 (to go along with 99 RBI that season).

    Of course, this was 1982 and sabermetrics wasn’t what it is today. And, for some reason, in 1983, he was sent to A-Ball where he only played in 73 games and was striking out at an alarming pace.

    The story ends there. He was out of organized baseball after 1983 at the age of twenty-five.

    And, today, he and Phil Coke are the only two players drafted from Sonora High School in La Habra (California) to go play in the major leagues.

    Thomas Neal

    Posted by on January 26th, 2013 · Comments (8)

    I actually like this deal.

    Is It Spring Training Yet?

    Posted by on January 26th, 2013 · Comments (1)

    Click here.

    DEA & MLB Investigating A-Rod Miami Based Advisor

    Posted by on January 26th, 2013 · Comments (10)

    Via the Daily News

    The Drug Enforcement Administration and Major League Baseball are investigating a Miami-area man named Anthony Bosch — who has worked closely with Alex Rodriguez — for Bosch’s possible links to performance-enhancing drugs, sources have told the Daily News. The sources asked not to be identified because of the ongoing probe.

    Bosch, a well-known figure among current and former Latin ballplayers in South Florida, has advised the embattled Yankee superstar on nutrition, dietary supplements and training, a source familiar with Miami-area anti-aging centers told The News.

    The source said Rodriguez and Bosch consulted with at least one other expert about blood test results. Bosch, records show, has been affiliated with a number of Miami-area medical companies and clinics.

    Major League Baseball investigators have turned over information about Bosch and his father, physician Pedro Publio Bosch, to federal investigators, sources have told the Daily News. Bosch and his father had already come under scrutiny from MLB and the DEA in 2009 for their links to Manny Ramirez after the then-Dodgers slugger was suspended that year for 50 games for using a banned substance.

    The Daily News reported in June of 2009 that the DEA initiated an administrative review of Pedro Bosch because investigators suspected he wrote a prescription for the banned drug used by Ramirez, who was banned for violating MLB’s drug policy that year.

    Anthony Bosch was described by the Daily News and other media outlets in 2009 as being well-known in Latin-American circles, his relationship with players dating as far back as the early 2000s when he attended parties with players and attended games in New York and Boston.

    Sources involved in the probe have told The News that MLB and federal investigators are trying to determine if Anthony Bosch and his father are involved in supplying banned substances to ballplayers.

    Rodriguez cut ties to controversial Canadian doctor Anthony Galea not long after American and Canadian law-enforcement agencies launched investigations into the Toronto sports physician and human growth hormone proponent in 2009. That was when American authorities found HGH and other drugs in his assistant’s car as she tried to cross the border. Galea, who said he treated A-Rod with a blood-spinning technique called platelet-rich plasma therapy (PRP), was indicted on five drug-related counts in October of 2010, but the U.S. government agreed to drop four of the charges if he complied with a plea agreement and cooperated with prosecutors pursuing other investigations.

    The indictment said Galea traveled to the United States more than 100 times between 2007 and 2009 to treat more than 20 patients in their homes and in hotel rooms.

    Galea pleaded guilty in July of 2011 to transporting misbranded and unapproved drugs into the United States. He was sentenced to a year of supervised release in December of 2011.

    Calls placed to Anthony Bosch’s telephone numbers in Miami weren’t returned, nor were calls to Pedro Bosch’s Coral Gables area clinic.

    Major League Baseball declined comment, as did the Yankees. Rodriguez’s lawyer, Jay Reisinger, declined comment.

    According to sources familiar with the Miami investigation, MLB is concerned about a widespread ring of suppliers of synthetic testosterone, human growth hormone and other drugs to players who have sought to circumvent MLB’s collective drug-testing program through difficult-to-detect performance-enhancing drugs that players administer through patches or creams or gels on their palms or elbows or under their arms.

    Hmmmmm…

    Could a possible 50-game suspension TBA for A-Rod be the reason why Brian Cashman is now hinting that he may not play at all in 2013?

    Cashman: A-Rod Could Miss Season

    Posted by on January 25th, 2013 · Comments (2)

    Via Jon Lane

    The arthroscopic surgery New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez had on January 16 to repair a torn labrum and impingement in his left hip went, according to a subsequent statement released by the team, “as planned and without complications.” While it’s anticipated A-Rod will return after the All-Star break, general manager Brian Cashman did not dismiss the possibility that Rodriguez would be sidelined the entire 2013 season.

    “I think, because of the serious nature of the surgery and the condition that he’s trying to recover from, there is that chance,” Cashman told WFAN-AM in New York on Friday. “I would say it’s not going to be because Alex doesn’t do everything in his power to put himself in a position to get back, and be healthy and productive. He’ll do everything necessary and his part. It’s just will the success of the surgery and the condition that he has recover optimally as everybody expects, but there’s no guarantees in this stuff. Best-case scenario, yeah, he should be back. Worst-case scenario he won’t be back or there might be something in between. These are unique circumstances and new experiences injury wise that has a very small history behind it in the last decade or so.”

    Sounds like ol’ Cash is greasing the skids of the news that’s coming down the pipe this summer when A-Rod is MIA at the time he’s expected to return.

    Me? I wouldn’t miss Alex at all if he sat out the whole season. And, if he does, then, stick a fork in him…because there’s no way he’s coming back from that long of a lay off, given all the other time he’s missed recently, and coming to the table with something to offer.

    Really Productive Non-Sluggers

    Posted by on January 25th, 2013 · Comments (0)

    I wonder if any of these guys would have used PEDs if they were in vogue when they played…

    Rk Player Rbat OPS+ SLG PA From To Age G R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB BA OBP
    1 Stan Hack 237 119 .397 8508 1932 1947 22-37 1938 1239 2193 363 81 57 642 1092 .301 .394
    2 Luke Appling 233 113 .398 10254 1930 1950 23-43 2422 1319 2749 440 102 45 1116 1302 .310 .399
    3 Jimmy Sheckard 200 122 .372 7657 1901 1913 22-34 1772 1055 1717 297 105 45 621 994 .271 .374
    4 Richie Ashburn 198 111 .382 9736 1948 1962 21-35 2189 1322 2574 317 109 29 586 1198 .308 .396
    5 Harry Hooper 195 114 .387 10250 1909 1925 21-37 2309 1429 2466 389 160 75 817 1136 .281 .368
    6 Brett Butler 187 110 .376 9545 1981 1997 24-40 2213 1359 2375 277 131 54 578 1129 .290 .377
    7 Toby Harrah 184 114 .395 8767 1969 1986 20-37 2155 1115 1954 307 40 195 918 1153 .264 .365
    8 John Titus 183 127 .385 5818 1903 1913 27-37 1402 738 1401 253 72 38 561 620 .282 .373
    9 Topsy Hartsel 181 129 .370 5541 1901 1911 27-37 1286 797 1274 179 90 28 320 807 .275 .383
    10 Mike Hargrove 177 121 .391 6694 1974 1985 24-35 1666 783 1614 266 28 80 686 965 .290 .396
    11 Roger Bresnahan 168 127 .377 5355 1901 1915 22-36 1438 681 1246 218 71 26 527 713 .279 .386
    12 Roy Thomas 165 123 .329 5198 1901 1911 27-37 1180 742 1191 84 46 7 219 812 .282 .403
    13 Heinie Groh 161 118 .384 7037 1912 1927 22-37 1676 918 1774 308 87 26 566 696 .292 .373
    14 Elmer Valo 152 115 .391 6091 1940 1961 19-40 1806 768 1420 228 73 58 601 942 .282 .398
    15 Ginger Beaumont 148 126 .392 5160 1901 1910 24-33 1214 760 1447 153 65 31 529 344 .311 .361
    16 Elbie Fletcher 143 117 .390 5826 1934 1949 18-33 1415 723 1323 228 58 79 616 851 .271 .384
    17 George Burns 143 114 .384 8251 1911 1925 21-35 1853 1188 2077 362 108 41 611 872 .287 .366
    18 Jim Fregosi 139 113 .398 7403 1961 1978 19-36 1902 844 1726 264 78 151 706 715 .265 .338
    19 Frank Schulte 105 114 .395 7412 1904 1918 21-35 1806 906 1766 288 124 92 792 545 .270 .332
    20 Don Buford 102 115 .379 5347 1963 1972 26-35 1286 718 1203 157 44 93 418 672 .264 .362
    21 Tommy Leach 102 111 .372 8401 1901 1918 23-40 1996 1260 1991 255 164 57 737 762 .270 .341
    22 Fred Tenney 101 112 .337 5738 1901 1911 29-39 1319 733 1362 159 42 14 327 618 .278 .365
    23 Willie Keeler 99 115 .357 5063 1901 1910 29-38 1161 696 1365 103 47 12 287 265 .305 .352
    24 Bruce Bochte 96 113 .396 5994 1974 1986 23-35 1538 643 1478 250 21 100 658 653 .282 .360
    25 Fielder Jones 94 112 .326 5087 1901 1915 29-43 1165 694 1152 132 42 10 375 551 .268 .357
    26 Patsy Dougherty 92 117 .360 5109 1902 1911 25-34 1233 678 1294 138 78 17 413 378 .284 .346
    27 Amos Strunk 83 112 .374 5810 1908 1924 19-35 1511 696 1418 213 96 15 530 573 .284 .359
    28 Hal Chase 83 112 .391 7939 1905 1919 22-36 1919 980 2158 322 124 57 941 276 .291 .319
    29 Terry Puhl 76 112 .388 5480 1977 1991 20-34 1531 676 1361 226 56 62 435 505 .280 .349
    30 Art Devlin 73 110 .338 5241 1904 1913 24-33 1313 603 1185 164 57 10 505 576 .269 .364
    31 Dick Hoblitzell 66 111 .374 5370 1908 1918 19-29 1318 591 1310 194 88 27 593 407 .278 .341
    32 Fred Merkle 60 110 .383 6426 1907 1926 18-37 1638 720 1580 290 81 61 733 454 .273 .331
    33 Les Mann 56 110 .398 5200 1913 1928 20-35 1499 677 1332 203 106 44 503 324 .282 .332
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 1/25/2013.

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    Yanks Cashman: I’m Always Looking To Plug Holes

    Posted by on January 25th, 2013 · Comments (10)

    Brian Cashman speaks! Great stuff via Bryan Hoch –

    On looking forward to Spring Training: “I am, especially in this kind of weather. It’s nice to get out there, and now we can actually show you that we do have a team. A lot of people think we don’t.”

    On proving those people wrong: “That comes in the course of the season. I have until now and the Trade Deadline to solve all issues, and everybody usually has some area of vulnerability. We obviously have some that we need to shore up. I think the pitching staff’s not one of them at this stage, and we have a lot of quality players we are going to be running out there. So I’ll have some time between Opening Day and May 21 or whatever to continue to look for ways to shore up and improve those areas, such as the bench and right-handed bat for the outfield, that currently stand out.”

    On the Yankees being better in 2013: “It’s too early to say whether we’ll be better. It’s hard to be better than a 95-win team anyway, it’s hard to squeeze out an extra win from 95 wins to 96 or 97 or whatever. It’s too early to say. It’s still evolving. We’ve got players who are getting healthy. We’ve just got to have more time to reinforce some areas but also see where we are with Jeter, Mariano and CC — all are expected to be fine, but until they’re out there doing what you’re consistently used to seeing, you’ve got to wait it out.”

    On the offseason: “I’m in the marketplace both with free agent and trade, and I’ll stay that way, with available players and have conversations, whether it’s a non-roster invite or actually a Major League acquisition in some form or fashion. I mean, I’m open for it. Clearly, everything that’s taken place so far, either we passed on or they passed on us. We just keep working on it and see where it takes us.”

    On feeling comfortable with this roster: “My job is never to feel comfortable. I never do. We had the ’98 world championship team, and I wasn’t comfortable. So I’ve never been comfortable — and that team was 125 wins and 50 losses. So I think it’s best to never feel comfortable.”

    So, there you have it! Mr. Cashman said: We obviously have [some area of vulnerability] that we need to shore up. I think the pitching staff’s not one of them at this stage, and we have a lot of quality players we are going to be running out there.

    Do you agree with is assessment of the Yankees pitching staff? Personally, I see a lot of risk there due to age and/or mileage. Also, I think the jury is still out on a lot of the Yankees younger pitchers – including Phil Hughes. But, Cash sees it different, as of now…

    Yankees Assistant General Manager Jean Afterman

    Posted by on January 24th, 2013 · Comments (5)

    If you had to guess, how much money do you think the Yankees are paying Jean Afterman on an annual basis? Related, what do you think she does for the Yankees each day that she reports to work? She can’t be working on player contracts 260 days a year, can she? What else does she do for the Yankees? What makes her useful as an assistant G.M.? And, what makes her unique and useful to the organization? Does anyone know the answers to these questions?

    Vance Albitz, Spreading The Glove

    Posted by on January 24th, 2013 · Comments (0)

    Awesome story.

    Justin Upton Traded To The Braves

    Posted by on January 24th, 2013 · Comments (5)

    Source: Braves get Justin Upton and Chris Johnson from D-backs for Prado, Delgado, Ahmed and Spruill.

    More on the deal.

    Gene “Stick” Michael

    Posted by on January 24th, 2013 · Comments (0)

    Gene Michael became the Yankees G.M. in August of 1990 – taking over what was probably the worst team in Yankees history, in terms of pitching and hitting.

    By 1993, he took that sorry roster and turned it into a team that won 88 games. And, the following season, the team was in first place when play stopped due to labor issues. Further, Stick’s team reached the post-season in 1995.

    Also, it was Michael’s cadre of players who led the Yankees to World Series rings in 1996, 1998, 1999 and 2000 (even though he was no longer G.M. of the team after 1995).

    Stick is currently 74-years old.

    Wouldn’t it be nice if the Yankees did something in his honor as payback for the way he turned around their franchise? If you agree, what would be appropriate?

    Worst Pitching Staff In Yankees History

    Posted by on January 24th, 2013 · Comments (7)

    It has to be the 1989 staff, right?

    Rk Pos Age W L W-L% ERA G GS GF SV IP HR BB SO ERA+ WHIP SO/9 SO/BB
    1 SP Andy Hawkins 29 15 15 .500 4.80 34 34 0 0 208.1 23 76 98 81 1.507 4.2 1.29
    2 SP Clay Parker 26 4 5 .444 3.68 22 17 1 0 120.0 12 31 53 106 1.283 4.0 1.71
    3 SP Dave LaPoint* 29 6 9 .400 5.62 20 20 0 0 113.2 12 45 51 69 1.680 4.0 1.13
    4 SP Greg Cadaret* 27 5 5 .500 4.58 20 13 1 0 92.1 7 38 66 85 1.592 6.4 1.74
    5 SP Walt Terrell 31 6 5 .545 5.20 13 13 0 0 83.0 9 24 30 75 1.518 3.3 1.25
    Rk Pos Age W L W-L% ERA G GS GF SV IP HR BB SO ERA+ WHIP SO/9 SO/BB
    6 CL Dave Righetti* 30 2 6 .250 3.00 55 0 53 25 69.0 3 26 51 130 1.435 6.7 1.96
    7 RP Lee Guetterman* 30 5 5 .500 2.45 70 0 38 13 103.0 6 26 51 160 1.204 4.5 1.96
    8 RP Lance McCullers 25 4 3 .571 4.57 52 1 20 3 84.2 9 37 82 86 1.417 8.7 2.22
    9 RP Eric Plunk 25 7 5 .583 3.69 27 7 5 0 75.2 9 52 61 106 1.546 7.3 1.17
    10 RP Dale Mohorcic 33 2 1 .667 4.99 32 0 10 2 57.2 8 18 24 78 1.439 3.7 1.33
    Rk Pos Age W L W-L% ERA G GS GF SV IP HR BB SO ERA+ WHIP SO/9 SO/BB
    11 Chuck Cary* 29 4 4 .500 3.26 22 11 4 0 99.1 13 29 79 120 1.077 7.2 2.72
    12 Tommy John* 46 2 7 .222 5.80 10 10 0 0 63.2 6 22 18 68 1.712 2.5 0.82
    13 Richard Dotson 30 2 5 .286 5.57 11 9 2 0 51.2 8 17 14 70 1.665 2.4 0.82
    14 John Candelaria* 35 3 3 .500 5.14 10 6 1 0 49.0 8 12 37 76 1.245 6.8 3.08
    15 Jimmy Jones 25 2 1 .667 5.25 11 6 3 0 48.0 7 16 25 75 1.500 4.7 1.56
    16 Dave Eiland 22 1 3 .250 5.77 6 6 0 0 34.1 5 13 11 68 1.660 2.9 0.85
    17 Al Leiter* 23 1 2 .333 6.08 4 4 0 0 26.2 1 21 22 65 1.650 7.4 1.05
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
    Generated 1/24/2013.

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    Worst Offensive Line-Up In Yankees History

    Posted by on January 24th, 2013 · Comments (8)

    It has to be the 1990 team, right?

    Rk Pos Age G PA R HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS OPS+
    1 C Bob Geren 28 110 303 21 8 31 0 13 73 .213 .259 .325 .584 63
    2 1B Don Mattingly* 29 102 428 40 5 42 1 28 20 .256 .308 .335 .643 81
    3 2B Steve Sax 30 155 680 70 4 42 43 49 46 .260 .316 .325 .641 80
    4 SS Alvaro Espinoza 28 150 472 31 2 20 1 16 54 .224 .258 .274 .532 50
    5 3B Jim Leyritz 26 92 339 28 5 25 2 27 51 .257 .331 .356 .688 93
    6 LF Oscar Azocar* 25 65 218 18 5 19 7 2 15 .248 .257 .355 .612 70
    7 CF Roberto Kelly 25 162 687 85 15 61 42 33 148 .285 .323 .418 .741 106
    8 RF Jesse Barfield 30 153 570 69 25 78 4 82 150 .246 .359 .456 .815 127
    9 DH Steve Balboni 33 116 307 24 17 34 0 35 91 .192 .291 .406 .697 94
    Rk Pos Age G PA R HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS OPS+
    10 UT Mel Hall* 29 113 371 41 12 46 0 6 46 .258 .272 .433 .706 95
    11 UT Kevin Maas* 25 79 300 42 21 41 1 43 76 .252 .367 .535 .902 150
    12 UT Matt Nokes* 26 92 264 21 8 32 2 20 33 .238 .307 .354 .661 85
    13 3B Randy Velarde 27 95 253 21 5 19 0 20 53 .210 .275 .319 .594 66
    14 3B Mike Blowers 25 48 157 16 5 21 1 12 50 .188 .255 .319 .574 60
    15 OF Deion Sanders* 22 57 149 24 3 9 8 13 27 .158 .236 .271 .507 42
    16 C Rick Cerone 36 49 146 12 2 11 0 5 13 .302 .324 .388 .713 99
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
    Generated 1/24/2013.

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    Canseco & Strawberry

    Posted by on January 24th, 2013 · Comments (0)

    Two of a kind?

    Player WAR/pos G R H From To Age PA HR RBI BB SO SB CS BA OBP SLG
    Darryl Strawberry 39.2 1583 898 1401 1983 1999 21-37 6326 335 1000 816 1352 221 99 .259 .357 .505
    Jose Canseco 39.2 1887 1186 1877 1985 2001 20-36 8129 462 1407 906 1942 200 88 .266 .353 .515
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 1/24/2013.

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    At the least, they were poster boys for late ’80’s baseball and “Coulda/Shoulda” careers.

    Played 25 Games @ C, 2B and CF

    Posted by on January 24th, 2013 · Comments (0)

    Only two players have done this in their major league career-

    Rk Player WAR/pos From To Age G PA H HR RBI BB SO SB BA OBP SLG Pos
    1 Craig Biggio 62.1 1988 2007 22-41 2850 12504 3060 291 1175 1160 1753 414 .281 .363 .433 *4287/D9
    2 Roger Bresnahan 39.1 1901 1915 22-36 1438 5355 1246 26 527 713 403 212 .279 .386 .377 *28/5934761
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 1/24/2013.

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    How many of you knew this before I told you?

    The Hallowed Halls Debate

    Posted by on January 23rd, 2013 · Comments (0)

    An interesting panel and debate…

    The Face Of Derek Jeter, Then & Now

    Posted by on January 23rd, 2013 · Comments (10)

    Derek Jeter 1996 vs 2013

    What a drag it is getting old…

    This is Derek Jeter circa 1996 compared to Derek Jeter today. I find it kind of sad that my kids, soon to be 9- and 11-years old, will never remember the “young” Derek Jeter. Heck, how many of us remember him that way…? (And, I say this as someone who was 33-years old when Jeter was a rookie back in ’96.)

    Miscalculation In Yankees Austerity Plan?

    Posted by on January 23rd, 2013 · Comments (2)

    Via Ken Rosenthal

    The Yankees’ benefits for reducing their payroll below the $189 million luxury-tax threshold in 2014 might not be as lucrative as they originally envisioned.

    The team would realize one financial incentive by meeting its payroll target — a rollback in its luxury-tax rate from a potential 50 percent to 17.5 percent if it again exceeded the threshold.

    But the second anticipated benefit — a rebate in the new market-disqualification revenue-sharing program — might fall well below the Yankees’ expectations.

    Under the labor agreement, the 15 clubs in the largest markets will forfeit an increasing percentage of their revenue-sharing proceeds starting in 2013, and become ineligible for any such money by ’16.

    The revenue-sharing funds that would have gone to those clubs then would be redistributed to payors such as the Yankees. The idea is to motivate certain big-market clubs — the Toronto Blue Jays, for example — to increase their revenues, knowing that they no longer would qualify for revenue-sharing money.

    From that perspective, the plan appears to be working — the Blue Jays, Washington Nationals and Atlanta Braves are among the big-market clubs that anticipate higher revenues next season, according to major league sources.

    Such developments would reduce the size of the market-disqualification pot — and in turn reduce the percentage of that pot the Yankees would receive.

    The Yankees anticipated $10 million from the market-disqualification program if they got below the luxury-tax threshold one time and $40 million if they stayed under it from 2014 to ’16, according to Joel Sherman of the New York Post.

    If those figures turn out to be less than the Yankees projected, it would raise the question of why the team acted so diligently to get under $189 million by 2014.

    Yankees officials, however, maintain that the team’s offseason strategy has not been influenced by future luxury-tax considerations. They say the front office simply is not enamored with the players on the market.

    Then again, maybe the Steinbrenner Kids are just trying to drive down expenses in preparation of selling the team?

    You Tell ‘Em Bob

    Posted by on January 22nd, 2013 · Comments (2)

    Thanks to 77yankees, for the tip on this one.

    Phillies Sign Delmon Young

    Posted by on January 22nd, 2013 · Comments (6)

    Via Paul White

    The Philadelphia Phillies obviously weren’t as concerned about Delmon Young’s ability to play the outfield as his previous employers.

    The former Detroit outfielder and mostly DH signed a one-year, $750,000 contract with the Phillies today. The contract also includes undisclosed performance incentives.

    “Delmon is an experienced major league bat who will add some depth to our relatively inexperienced outfield and another layer of competition for playing time there as well,” said general manager Ruben Amaro in a statement released by the club.

    Average hitter, at best. Terrible fielder, at best. And, not the nicest person in the world, by any means. But, $750,000 ain’t that much more than the big league minimum.

    If he behaves, hits like he normally does, and they have a defensive caddy for him, the ROI here could be pretty good.

    That’s Some Storey

    Posted by on January 22nd, 2013 · Comments (2)

    Here’s a side of being a pro player that few take the time to think about…

    (more…)

    Tyler Austin

    Posted by on January 22nd, 2013 · Comments (6)

    Interesting read: Q&A: Austin embraces position, past – Yankees ‘mega-prospect’ overcame cancer, idolized Jeter

    Here are Austin’s minor league stats:

                                                                          
    Year   Age      Tm        Lev   G  PA   R 2B HR RBI BB  SO   BA  OBP  SLG
    2010    18 Yankees         Rk   2   4   0  0  0   0  0   1 .000 .500 .000
    2011    19 2 Teams      A--Rk  47 201  29 18  6  36 15  39 .354 .418 .579
    2012    20 4 Teams A-A+-AA-Rk 110 472  92 35 17  80 51  98 .322 .400 .559
    3 Seasons                     159 677 121 53 23 116 66 138 .331 .406 .563

    Kid looks like a hitter. But, why did he last until the 13th round of the draft and sign for only $130,000? That’s very strange.

    Mets Sign Pedro Feliciano

    Posted by on January 21st, 2013 · Comments (4)

    True story.

    No idea if the Mets sent Brian Cashman a “Thank You!” card for baby-sitting Pedro for the last two years…

    Who Played On More World Series Winners: Derek Jeter, Jack Barry Or Dal Maxvill?

    Posted by on January 21st, 2013 · Comments (1)

    The answer is here.

    WTF-Rod?

    Posted by on January 21st, 2013 · Comments (13)

    This was in a recent “Bill James Online Mailbag” –

    As a Yankee fan (sorry, apologies upfront), I’d like to give the organization and A-Rod the benefit of the doubt on waiting until January to have surgery that, I seem to remember, we all knew he was going to have back in November. I’m assuming that there might have been medical reasons for having to wait? Otherwise…wtf?
    Asked by: rtallia

    Answered: 1/18/2013
    I’ll tell you this: it’s a big wtf inside baseball. Obviously there is SOMETHING going on there that we don’t know about.

    Pre-hab be damned?

    It does seem odd that A-Rod had “relatively minimal cartilage damage in his left hip” and, yet, required “pre-hab” and even the surgery itself.

    A-Rod enjoys his time off and getting paid to party (while the rest of his team is playing). Could this whole hip thing be a case of “Bench me in the post-season? Well, then, screw you – I’m taking a spring vacation next year!” payback thing from Alex?

    Field Manual Addiction

    Posted by on January 21st, 2013 · Comments (2)

    I may be hopeless.

    Can there be another reason why I can ogle the current Baseball Express catalog over and over again like a pubescent boy would handle an old edition of Playboy that fell into his hands?

    2013 Starting Rotations: Yankees Vs. Blue Jays

    Posted by on January 21st, 2013 · Comments (8)

    This could be Toronto’s starting rotation this season:

    Age Yrs
    Mark Buehrle 34 13
    Josh Johnson 29 8
    R.A. Dickey 38 10
    Ricky Romero 28 4
    Brandon Morrow 28 6
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
    Generated 1/21/2013.

    .
    And, this should be the Yankees starting rotation this season:

    Age Yrs
    CC Sabathia 32 12
    Hiroki Kuroda 38 5
    Andy Pettitte 41 17
    Phil Hughes 27 6
    Ivan Nova 26 3
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
    Generated 1/21/2013.

    .
    Which do you think will be better in 2013 and why?

    Me?  I think they both have interesting potential.   But, they both have some potential serious question marks around age or mileage and the ability to stay healthy.  I think  both rotations, on the high end, could win 70 games each this season.  But, on the low end,  each could only win 55 games in 2013.

    Of course, since both teams play in the same division and face each other so often, maybe the key here will be who wins when they face each other?  And, in that case, it will come down to the batting line-ups and bullpens.

    Zzzzz…

    Posted by on January 21st, 2013 · Comments (1)

    Hart has a point.

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