• A-Rod To Retire?

    Posted by on June 27th, 2013 · Comments (25)

    Via Bill Madden

    Alex Rodriguez has 114 million reasons for telling the world that he has the green light to play baseball games again.

    According to sources close to the ongoing drama surrounding the star-crossed Yankee third baseman, Rodriguez and his advisers are so concerned that Major League Baseball’s drug posse is quickly closing in on him that they have racheted up the timetable for him to return to game action.

    Once he’s back playing in rehab games, the sources say, he could then claim he is physically unable to perform because of the serious hip injury he is recovering from, “retire” from the game, and still collect the full amount of his salary — $114 million over the next five years.

    “It’s all about him getting his money and not losing it to suspension,” one source close to the situation told the Daily News. “He knows he’s never going to the Hall of Fame. All that’s left for him is to make sure he gets his money — all of it.”

    One way to do that is for Rodriguez to return to game action, find he can no longer perform up to his standards, then retire before he’s hit with a suspension without pay. A player who retires because he is physically unable to perform, even if he’s later suspended, would still get the full amount of his contract.

    Albert Belle suffered a similar hip injury that ended his career in 2001, and he was forced to go on a series of 60-day disabled lists in order to collect the remainder of his contract.

    Be honest: Of all the stakeholders in the A-Rod situation, would any of them be upset if this plan came true?

    Comments on A-Rod To Retire?

    1. #15
      June 27th, 2013 | 10:36 am

      Only the insurance company!

      Expect that stakeholder, the one left holding the bag, to scream bloody murder.

    2. Scout
      June 27th, 2013 | 10:38 am

      Rumors, gossip, unnamed sources. Let’s wait for the situation to play out. It won’t happen quickly — far too many lawyers involved. They need their cut, too.

    3. June 27th, 2013 | 10:46 am

      It will be interesting to see how A-Rod does in his rehab games. If he’s hitting .400 with power, it’s not going to help his case, if this is his plan. On the flip side, it will be interesting to see if it’s obvious that he’s tanking it out there, in the rehab games. That will not go unreported.

    4. Garcia
      June 27th, 2013 | 11:13 am

      Steve L. wrote:

      It will be interesting to see how A-Rod does in his rehab games. If he’s hitting .400 with power, it’s not going to help his case, if this is his plan. On the flip side, it will be interesting to see if it’s obvious that he’s tanking it out there, in the rehab games. That will not go unreported.

      Haha! You mean if he performs consistent to last year’s ALDS and ALCS performance? How can anyone tell the difference? The guy is Keyser Söze now – the greatest trick ARod ever pulled was convincing the world all he did was real.

    5. MJ Recanati
      June 27th, 2013 | 11:18 am

      Garcia wrote:

      The guy is Keyser Söze now – the greatest trick ARod ever pulled was convincing the world all he did was real.

      Wasn’t it real though? I mean, where do you draw the line between talent and PED use? Are you suggesting that, but for PED’s, Rodriguez would’ve been an average (or worse) player?

      I’m not arguing, I just really want to know. Since none of us — not even people that work in baseball — know the exact effects of PED’s as they translate to performance on the field, it’s very hard for me to believe that magic little pills made Rodriguez one of the best players in MLB history. If it were that easy then why did Jason Grimsley or Manny Alexander suck at the pro level?

    6. Garcia
      June 27th, 2013 | 11:41 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Wasn’t it real though? I mean, where do you draw the line between talent and PED use? Are you suggesting that, but for PED’s, Rodriguez would’ve been an average (or worse) player?

      I’m not arguing, I just really want to know. Since none of us — not even people that work in baseball — know the exact effects of PED’s as they translate to performance on the field, it’s very hard for me to believe that magic little pills made Rodriguez one of the best players in MLB history. If it were that easy then why did Jason Grimsley or Manny Alexander suck at the pro level?

      That is absolutely what I am saying. I don’t even care about PEDs, but to act like there is no actual effect to performance is akin to closing one eye and covering up the sun with your thumb and saying it is not there.

      And the evidence, however anecdotal, is there. Barry Bonds was a great player, he becomes a lab rat of Victor Conte and co. and all of a sudden he’s performing at a rate unheard of and unseen. ARod I am now convinced was on PEDs during the 2009 playoffs, where there is smoke there is fire. He was performing at a rate unseen before. I absolutely believe that ARod was on PEDs for his entire career, so he was therefore never real, never good or great, he was someone that immensely benefited from PEDs. But again, I. DO NOT. CARE. Why? I was waving my big ARod is #1 foam finger during the 2009 playoffs and that world series is not invalidated by any means because of what ARod did.

      I know people like to get on their pedestal and say that bs about invalidating stuff, but I do not care if he was smoking a doobie, doing a line of blow, and drinking a bud before going out to play. He performed and that is all that counted, whether his piss would glow is irrelevant to me. When those games were on the line and there was a ton of tension, I doubt any of those thoughts crossed any persons’ mind. So I find people to be highly hypocritical once you remove the “moment” of the game and people become reflective – you know, that 27th championship, it just doesn’t feel the same. Well, you know what, take your purity and self righteousness out of here and go to the Vatican and hang out with those f’ing saints. I am fine and at peace with the sinners.

      Where you and I disagree is: the effect of PEDs. Whether placebo or real, there is still one. Otherwise, why risk having your nuts shriveled up? Just cause they did not help Randy Velarde does not mean others did not find the right “mix” that could help. ARod found the silver bullet that made him a ton of money. Good for him!

    7. EHawk
      June 27th, 2013 | 11:48 am

      The F-Bomb that broke A-Rod back? If this leads to Arod retiring then huge Kudos to Cashman!!!

    8. Scout
      June 27th, 2013 | 12:02 pm

      I just don’t see A-Rod’s retirement in the cards now. If he retires and tries to claim his full salary, he’ll be embroiled in civil litigation for years (with the team or the insurance company). His entire past would become open season. Whatever remains of his image and reputation would be destroyed. Rather than subject himself to that humiliation, he’ll drag his aging and decaying body back onto the field, forcing the Yankees to DL him time and again.

    9. MJ Recanati
      June 27th, 2013 | 12:25 pm

      Garcia wrote:

      I don’t even care about PEDs, but to act like there is no actual effect to performance is akin to closing one eye and covering up the sun with your thumb and saying it is not there.

      I don’t care about PED’s either and I’m not a holy roller that feel cheated or anything like that. The commissioner, the owners, GM’s, the press, and fans all provided incentives for players to use PED’s and they did just that. I don’t blame players for seeing an opportunity to enrich themselves while the rest of baseball’s stakeholders and the third and fourth estates all cheered them on.

      Having said that, I don’t agree that you can claim with any degree of certainty that PED’s transformed all players equally. After all, you noted that Barry Bonds “was a great player…[used PED’s]…perform[ed] at a rate unheard of and unseen.” So if Bonds was already great then how do you know Rodriguez wasn’t already great when he was a teenager on the Mariners?

      And you still don’t address how some players — Grimsley, Alexander, Velarde, literally dozens (if not hundreds) of others — didn’t reach the same heights while using the same substances.

      I won’t say there’s a 0% correlation between performance and PED use but I won’t say there’s a 100% correlation either. We just don’t know how PED’s work on some individuals and where natural talent comes into play.

      Also, I find it hard to believe that Rodriguez would’ve found “the silver bullet” and no one else could find it, especially if we believe that Bosch was treating up to 20 MLB players. Why would Bosch not provide the other 19 with the same magical elixir? I can’t imagine an opportunist like Bosch would hold back on charging fees for products tha could turn also-rans into Hall of Famers…

    10. MJ Recanati
      June 27th, 2013 | 12:27 pm

      Scout wrote:

      Rather than subject himself to that humiliation, he’ll drag his aging and decaying body back onto the field, forcing the Yankees to DL him time and again.

      Yep, agreed. If anything, the smarter play for Rodriguez is to wait the Yankees out until they’re willing to buy him out of his contract. It’s easier to force the Yankees to buy him out than it is for him to fake injuries to the point of having to litigate with the insurance companies…

    11. #15
      June 27th, 2013 | 1:32 pm

      EHawk wrote:

      The F-Bomb that broke A-Rod back? If this leads to Arod retiring then huge Kudos to Cashman!!!

      You might have lurched into something there. Perhaps Cashman was giving A-Rod a look at the next 4.5 years. I’ve always thought that there would come a point where the Yankees would say to A-Rod, “Look, you are done. We’ll pay out $.50 on the dollar and you can go home. If not, we will have you sit there and ride the pines for the rest of the contract. Show up late and expect a heavy and public fine. You’re on the DL, get used to running 6:00 AM and 6:00 PM windsprints as part of your rehab. You’ll have to deal with the press everyday (we’ll give them open access), you’ll be hated by your teammates and you’ll be scorned by the fans who will spit at you and mock you. You can be a bump on a log, standing there in uniform having verbal arrows shot at you while Mo, Andy, and Jeter, get the love and graceful exits they deserve. There will be no A-Rod day at the Stadium. There will be no Old Timers Games, no first pitches, no stopping in to chat with Michael Kay in the booth. Your choice.”

      In other words, “What is it worth to you to just fade away and not have to endure this multi-year beating? The HOF is off the table. No one cares about the stats you have compiled. Don’t go away mad, just go away.”

      The insurance payout side of this is interesting in that it is the one area where the Yankees and A-Rod might see eye to eye (or wink to wink, wink, wink). I can see them “collaborating” on a finding that he is medically unfit to play ball.

    12. MJ Recanati
      June 27th, 2013 | 1:38 pm

      #15 wrote:

      In other words, “What is it worth to you to just fade away and not have to endure this multi-year beating? The HOF is off the table. No one cares about the stats you have compiled. Don’t go away mad, just go away.”

      Between collecting all or nearly all of the remaining $114M on his contract and being subject to hostility, Rodriguez will take the money. After all, he’s already been subject to plenty of hostility. The Yankees can subject him to only so much of what you’re subjecting before it becomes a grievable situation with the MLBPA. In other words, they can’t treat him any worse than the last player on the roster and subject him to treatment that is outside of norms for the rest of the team.

      As for your latter point, the Yankees would be insane to conspire to commit insurance fraud. A privately held company worth in excess of $3 billion dollars would be beyond foolish to risk so much for such a small payoff.

    13. MJ Recanati
      June 27th, 2013 | 1:39 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      subjecting

      *suggesting

    14. Scout
      June 27th, 2013 | 1:41 pm

      #15 wrote:

      In other words, “What is it worth to you to just fade away and not have to endure this multi-year beating? The HOF is off the table. No one cares about the stats you have compiled. Don’t go away mad, just go away.”

      I think the players’ union might have something to say about this: Get real.”

    15. #15
      June 27th, 2013 | 4:08 pm

      I’m making a hyperbolic point about the cold shoulder treatment. I’m exaggerating for effect, but the hatred will be there and he will feel it. The people I know that know A-Rod describe him as incredibly self aware & concerned about his image, fragile to the point of infantile when it comes to even minor critisism, and in constant need of reaffirmation of his greatness. I know, firsthand, that a Yankee coach was fired for making a minor suggestion about his defense. If he’s got an exit that will spare him humiliation, he may well accept it. He’s got a lot of outside business interests to keep a nice revenue stream rolling in, car dealerships, etc… even if he decides to sell them over time, and at a minimum he’d walk off with 1/2 of the $114 million.

      On the insurance front…. If it means not pushing himself like Gale Sayers circa 1968 to get back to full form and he can still get paid… Well, he’s not above that. Easily done without committing fraud. He’s had major operations on both hips. No one can deny that. He’s appeared to have worked hard in rehabbing. No one can deny that. But does he fight through the pain to really get himself in game-shape for 4.5 more of the most grueling of professional sport seasons, or just go through the motions and say, tearfully at a press conference, that he’s waking up at night screaming in pain, he’s afraid of the prospects of watching his kids grow up while he sits in a wheelchair, it’s just too hard, and he can’t do it anymore. He can flinch a lot or not flinch at all when they check his range of motion. He can underplay it or overplay it when they ask him “Does this hurt”. Let’s not ignore the fact that he does have degenerative hip issues. They are real. We aren’t talking about a kid faking a stomach ache to get out of school. There are real, documented medical problems.

    16. #15
      June 27th, 2013 | 4:20 pm

      One more angle on this… Do you or I know for sure that A-Rod can slide, pivot, throw off his back foot, dive for a ball in both directions, rotate his hips fast enough to catch up to major league heat, etc…? My point is that no one knows. Maybe he’ll lock up after playing two or three straight days and have a series of setbacks. Back problems often arise after hip issues. There is a lot of room for him to make the case he can’t play at his previous level (just see his performance last year before his recent surgery) if he choses to say so.

    17. Corey
      June 27th, 2013 | 4:21 pm

      I know, firsthand, that a Yankee coach was fired for making a minor suggestion about his defense.
      ——-
      firsthand? You were there? Which coach?

    18. June 27th, 2013 | 4:52 pm

      The Post claimed that he’s “not ready” for rehab starts in a story today, which contradicts what is written in the Daily News. How can he catch this “evil plan” if he isn’t ready to play rehab games yet, despite the tweet? We’re entering July, when some believe the first suspensions will be handed down. Something isn’t right here.

      http://www.nypost.com/p/sports/yankees/rod_tells_yankees_he_not_healthy_1AxuB9Cz89HV3w3hUjCEWL

      Also, as Scout suggested, wouldn’t this be insurance fraud? Why would A-Rod want to go through the years of possible litigation? I say he plays it out.

    19. MJ Recanati
      June 27th, 2013 | 5:10 pm

      #15 wrote:

      I know, firsthand, that a Yankee coach was fired for making a minor suggestion about his defense.

      Since any coach firing would be public information, tell us who it is. Larry Bowa? Fired when the majority of the coaching staff turned over after Torre was let go.

      Butch Wynegar? Canned — at least publicly — for being a dreadful third base coach.

      Can’t think of any other Yankee position coaches that have been let go since 2007.

    20. redbug
      June 27th, 2013 | 6:27 pm

      @ #15:”The people I know that know A-Rod describe him as incredibly self aware & concerned about his image, fragile to the point of infantile when it comes to even minor criticism, and in constant need of reaffirmation of his greatness.”

      That’s the Arod Joe Torre wrote about in his book.

      I’ve said this before. I don’t ever want to see Arod in pinstripes again. I can’t wait to be done w/ him.

    21. #15
      June 27th, 2013 | 10:12 pm

      @ Corey:
      I personally know the coach that got canned and he told it to me directly. No ambiguity, interpretation or hearsay.

      Sorry, but that is as far as I’ll go with that.

    22. MJ Recanati
      June 28th, 2013 | 9:18 am

      @ #15:
      All due respect but a coach telling you he got fired because of Rodriguez doesn’t make it true. I’m not saying it isn’t true but it’s not uncommon for someone that has been fired to blame someone he/she might’ve had issues with in the past, even if that wasn’t the reason for the firing.

      And, again, since coaches getting fired is public news, it’s only one of Lee Mazzilli, Roy White, Luis Sojo, Don Mattingly, Larry Bowa, or Bobby Meachem.

      It’s not Sojo since he’s currently working as manager of the Tampa Yankees. It’s not Bowa or Mattingly who both went with Joe Torre to the Dodgers. I highly doubt it’s Meachem who stank at his job. That would leave Mazzilli or White. I don’t know anything about White but I do know a little about Lee Maz…it could be him but he’s also always bit a bit melodramatic.

    23. #15
      June 28th, 2013 | 10:23 am

      @ MJ Recanati:

      My last post on this topic.

      I’m not getting into the “who”. I will say I knew the guy before he was a Yankee coach, while he was a Yankee coach, and now after he was a Yankee coach. If you knew the guy’s make-up, and had years of interaction with him as I’ve had, you would not question his veracity. He was told by Cashman directly why he was being let go. A-Rod demanded it. Admittedly, you’ll have to take my word on it.

    24. Mr. October
      June 29th, 2013 | 12:53 pm

      Garcia wrote:

      I. DO NOT. CARE. Why? I was waving my big ARod is #1 foam finger during the 2009 playoffs and that world series is not invalidated by any means because of what ARod did.

      Hopefully you enjoyed that world series, because its the last one you will see this team playing in for quite a while.
      Garcia wrote:

      Just cause they did not help Randy Velarde does not mean others did not find the right “mix” that could help.

      And others did.
      MJ Recanati wrote:

      I’m not arguing, I just really want to know. Since none of us — not even people that work in baseball — know the exact effects of PED’s as they translate to performance on the field, it’s very hard for me to believe that magic little pills made Rodriguez one of the best players in MLB history. If it were that easy then why did Jason Grimsley or Manny Alexander suck at the pro level?

      No one has suggested that “magic little pills” made Rodriguez one of the best players in M.L.B. history. If the “magic little pills” did not have a significant effect on his level of performance, then why did Rodriguez take the “magic little pills” for the period of time he has admitted to taking them, and assume all of the associated risks?
      MJ Recanati wrote:

      I don’t care about PED’s either and I’m not a holy roller that feel cheated or anything like that. The commissioner, the owners, GM’s, the press, and fans all provided incentives for players to use PED’s and they did just that. I don’t blame players for seeing an opportunity to enrich themselves while the rest of baseball’s stakeholders and the third and fourth estates all cheered them on.

      A person has to be a “holy roller” to be upset with the fact that a great baseball player and decent person such as Henry Louis Aaron lost the recognition he worked for and deserved for a career homerun record that should have had the distinction of standing for many more years or decades than it did because of Bond’s personal greed, and that the historical records and statistics of Major League baseball will always be affected and tainted by this “enrichment” for generations to come?
      MJ Recanati wrote:

      I don’t agree that you can claim with any degree of certainty that PED’s transformed all players equally.

      It can’t be claimed, and no one has suggested that it can be.
      MJ Recanati wrote:

      We just don’t know how PED’s work on some individuals and where natural talent comes into play.

      This discussion is so ridiculous, that it’s not worthy of further time or commentary.

    25. McMillan
      August 8th, 2013 | 2:34 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      I highly doubt it’s Meachem… That would leave Mazzilli or White.

      https://waswatching.com/2013/08/02/the-coach-that-a-rod-got-fired-delivers-a-message/

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      #15 said this happened and it was pretty easy to figure out [the coach was Meachem].

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